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All posts tagged Western Australia

Assessing the Environmental Impacts of Special Events: Examination of Nine Special Events in Western Australia

Categories: Case Study, Management, Oceania, Pacific, Private Sector, Public Sector
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In conjunction with the Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre’s work undertaken on the economic and social impacts of events impacts, this project aims to contribute to the development of an integrated suite of impact evaluation tools to be used by event organisers, venue managers, tourist organisers and other interested stakeholders.

by  Roy Jones, Alan Pilgrim, Graham Thompson and Colin MacGregor

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Assessing the Environmental Impacts of Special Events: Examination of Nine Special Events in Western Australia

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This study defines and explores the nature of impact creep within the context of two contrasting case studies. The methods applied in undertaking this study consisted of a literature review and development and distribution of questionnaires to visitors at Monkey Mia and an interview of managers at Monkey Mia and Tree Top Walk. The project considered impact creep relevant to both public and private facility developments.

by Amanda J. Smith and David Newsome

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Investigation into the Concept of and Factors Leading to Impact Creep and its Management

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Mountain Bike Activity in Natural Areas: Impacts, Assessment and Implications for Management: A Case Study from John Forrest National Park, Western Australia

Categories: Case Study, Management, Monitoring & Evaluation, Oceania, Pacific, Planet, Visitors
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This report addresses mountain biking as a recreational activity looking at the styles of riding and the corresponding demands of riders. It also identifies the major impacts of mountain biking and  potential management techniques for developing sustainable mountain biking activities. The study was conducted in John Forrest National Park (JFNP), a popular recreation area in the Perth metropolitan area, Western Australia.

by Claire Davies and  David Newsome

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Mountain Bike Activity in Natural Areas: Impacts, Assessment and Implications for Management: A Case Study from John Forrest National Park, Western Australia

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Heritage managers are increasingly expected to use tourism as a source of revenue to maintain heritage properties. Many of these individuals and organisations have little or no skills in business/tourism planning or financial management. This report outlines approaches that can assist with the development of heritage tourism across a region including use of a thematic framework to link heritage places, stories and practices together. The report includes a list of currently available resources at the time of publication of this report.

by Tod Jones, Michael Hughes, Vicki Peel, David Wood and Warwick Frost
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The project assessed the tourism potential of inland pastoral properties recently acquired by the Department of Conservation and Land Management (now DEC, Department of Environment and Conservation) in the Murchison and Gascoyne regions of Western Australia.

by Amanda J Smith, Michael Hughes, David Wood  and John Glasson

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This report provides the latest information about the characteristics and behaviours of visitors for the tourism industry, managers, and other research projects based in the Ningaloo Coastal Region. The Ningaloo Destination Modelling (NDM) project is a collaborative project between researchers from seven Australian universities and Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre that will deliver a scenario planning tool that assesses the social, environmental and economic impact of tourism planning strategies in order to assist tourism planning in a region that relies on its unique natural attractions.

by Tod Jones, Michael Hughes, David Wood, Anna Lewis and Philippa Chandler

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Ningaloo Coast Region Visitor Statistics: Collected for the Ningaloo Destination Modelling Project

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In Western Australia, licensing is utilised by State Government agencies to regulate the behaviour of the nature tourism industry from a number of perspectives. This study examined whether, in addition to its intended benefits, the State’s current licensing framework is creating impediments or costs for commercial nature tourism operators. Interviews with licensing agency representatives and a review of the literature pointed to licensing compliance costs as the main complaint from nature tour operators. Sources of dissatisfaction included the need for multiple licenses from multiple agencies, license security, added paperwork, and non-transferability of some types of licenses.

by Sabrina Genter, Jo Ann Beckwith and David Annandale

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This project provides series of detailed assessments of tourism values and costs in localities adjacent to protected areas in Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia. The project demonstrates a range of techniques for respectively measuring social, environmental and economic impacts of tourism activity.

by Michael Hughes, Tod Jones, Marg Deery, David Wood, Liz Fredline, Zachary Whitely, and Michael Lockwood

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This study investigated the issues surrounding iconic wildlife in terms of both visitor perceptions and experiences and also in terms of the economic contribution of visitors to the destination. The methods employed consisted of a literature review and development and distribution of questionnaires to visitors and tour operators  and an interview of managers at Monkey Mia, Western Australia and Hervey Bay, Queensland.

by Amanda Smith, David Newsome, Diane Lee and Natalie Stoeckl

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Role of Wildlife Icons as Major Tourist Attractions: Case Studies - Monkey Mia Dolphins and Hervey Bay Whale Watching

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