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All posts tagged Vegetation

In light of the rapidly growing tourism industry in the region, excessive tourist use of the dune lakes on Fraser Island could deleteriously affect their ecology and in turn, their aesthetic appeal to tourists. The findings from this research study suggest that the current level of tourist pressure on the perched dune lakes on Fraser Island is likely to have a significant long-term impact on the ecological health of these systems.

by Wade Hadwen, Angela Arthington, Stuart Bunn and Thorsten Mosisch

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Effects of Tourism on Fraser Islands Dune Lakes

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The research objective of the present project was to determine the relative impacts of disposal of human wastes on vegetation and soils in Tasmanian vegetation types that occur in areas used for wild country camping, with particular emphasis on the impact of digging, the impact of nutrient accessions, the persistence of  paper products, such as tissues, and the disturbance of burials by native animals.

by Jamie Kirkpatrick and Kerry Bridle

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Human Waste Contamination at Huts and Campsites in the Back Country of Tasmania

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The introduction of a minimal impact bushwalking (MIB) education campaign has alerted walkers to preferred behavioural practices in natural environments. However, despite the introduction of this campaign in Tasmania in 1987, there are still issues relating to visitor impact in back-country environments. The impact of visitors on the natural environment is often measured in terms of vegetation loss or track erosion. Impacts dealing with water quality issues have also been researched to a lesser degree. However, despite the visual impact of  inadequately buried human faeces at campsites, there has been very little work done on the extent of this problem, and on associated health risks.

by Kerry Bridle, Jamie Kirkpatrick and Julie von Platen

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Impacts of Recreation & Tourism on Plants in Protected Areas in Australia

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This report reviews research into impacts of recreation and tourism on vegetation in Australian protected areas and identifies key areas for future research. A comprehensive literature review of Australian and overseas research on tourism and recreation impacts  on vegetation in protected areas was conducted. Discussions were held with industry including staff from park agencies, as well as researchers in recreational  ecology.

by Catherine Pickering and Wendy Hill

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