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SOURCE: Lars Leetaru, NY Times

IATAestimates that over 4.3 billion passengers flew on an airplane in 2017, with the average traveler flying at least once every 22 months.

With the demand for flights increasing annually, the environmental impact of air travel is significant. Some estimates show that the carbon impact of travel is over 3 times higher than expected.

Here are some steps you can take to become a more ‘sustainable traveler’:

  • According to the Environmental Protection Agency aircrafts account for 12% of all U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from transportation. Using rail is a better alternative if available.
  • Avoiding multiple layovers and shorter flights are options to minimize your impact by reducing pollution per passenger mile. Fly direct as much as possible.
  • Using local public transport is an easy way for you to reduce your impact personally!
  • Consider using a bike rental to explore a new city.

Although air travel as we know it today has not been at the forefront of the sustainability movement, the prospects for a future of sustainable travel look promising. With fuel efficient planes on the horizon, the potential for low-carbon biofuels to replace up to 30% of jet fuel could lower the carbon intensity to about one third of what it was in 2016.

“Act as if what you’re doing makes a difference. It does” – William James

Read more tips on being a sustainable traveler here.  

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Travellers need to start making sustainable choices

Whether it is a chic, zero-emission hotel in Milan where toiletries are 99% biodegradable, or Gaansbai in South Africa, where conservation of native flora and fauna is a community-wide priority, sustainable tourism is growing fast across the globe.

It is a tribute to the myriad entrepreneurs, companies, creative individuals and communities that the United Nations is marking 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development.

This means that, throughout 2017, activities and initiatives across the spectrum of those involved in tourism will celebrate its transformational power on our global efforts to create a world that is cleaner and greener, more equal and more inclusive.

It is a celebration for each and every one of us: those who work and have interest in the sector and its sustainability, and also those consumers who travel to discover, to experience, and to give something back in return.

Research shows that a rising number of travellers want to tread lightly. The modern tourist wants to give back to the countries and communities they visit and reduce their impact on the environment. The campaign “Travel.Enjoy.Respect” that is linked to the International Year aims at precisely underlining the role of the traveller in amplifying the potential of tourism while avoiding damage on the environment, traditions, culture, heritage and local communities.

But what are the options for the would-be green traveller? How much of an impact can one person have?

Click here to read the original article from Bangkok Post.


By Taleb Rifai, Erik Solheim & Patricia Espinosa.

Taleb Rifai is Director-General of the World Tourism Organisation. Erik Solheim is Head of UN Environment. Patricia Espinosa is Executive Secretary of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change.

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This study examines the geodemographic and psychographic characteristics of touring holiday-makers in Australia. The results have implications for segmentation, targeting and promotions in relation to touring holidays and suggest a need for a differentiated marketing strategy.

by John Gountas and Sandra Gountas

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Characteristics of Touring Holiday-Makers in Australia

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This is the second edition of the State of the Tourism Industry report and, like the first, the aim is to provide an overview of the tourism industry in Australia through the reporting of key indicators augmented by expert commentary provided by a range of representatives from the various sectors which contribute to tourism. The report was produced in partnership with the National Tourism Alliance (NTA). This year, for the first time, a survey of operators was also undertaken with the assistance of the NTA  who distributed the online questionnaire through their member organisations. The survey asked operators to rate the issues that had been identified in the previous year’s report in terms of the impact each was having on their sector and region.

by Liz Fredline, Leo Jago and Sheena Day

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State of the Tourism Industry 2006

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Conscious consumers want more information about green hotels, but is peer-to-peer review the best way to validate good practice?

Hanging a ‘do not disturb’ sign on a hotel door almost always assures your privacy when away on holiday or business. But does hanging a used towel back on its rack assure your green preferences? Does this simple action mean you’ve played your part in being a sustainable hotel guest, or will housekeeping wash your towel anyway? Kathryn M. Werntz. Read more.

 

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Tourism Research Australia (TRA) has collected valuable data on Indigenous tourism visitors through its International Visitor Survey (IVS) and National Visitor Surveys (IVS and NVS).

by Tourism Research Australia

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Indigenous Tourism in Australia: Profiling the Domestic Market

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