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Trash Me with Rob Greenfield

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trash Rob Greenfield on the Salt Flats in Bolivia.

Rob Greenfield on the Salt Flats in Bolivia.

The average American creates 4.5 pounds of trash per day, so for 30 days, Rob Greenfield is going to live just like the average American. He’ll eat, shop, and consume like the average American. The catch? He has to wear every piece of trash he creates. 4.5 pounds of trash per day, will add up to 135 pounds of trash by day 30. That’s almost his body weight!

Most people never think twice about the trash they make. Once it’s in the garbage can it’s out of sight out of mind and although the 4.5 pounds of trash per day statistic is widely known, very few visuals exist to help people truly understand it. Through this project, Rob along with a team of filmmakers is out to change that for good. Trash Me will create an unforgettable and shocking visual of the trash that most of us create everyday that will stick in the minds of people and inspire them to drastically reduce the amount of trash they make. By keeping this project highly entertaining and eye catching, Trash Me will reach both people who have never thought about their waste as well as environmentalists who want to do better.

Throughout the 30 days, we will be covering the project live with a series of videos, Facebook live stream tutorials, blogs and media coverage. Rob will be a walking billboard of environmental awareness to educate and inspire people to make positive changes in their life to reduce their waste. And once the project is over we’ll release a film too. Follow the journey and on Rob’s Facebook page, and YouTube channel.

By Rob Greenfield. Read more about Rob’s adventures on RobGreenfield.TV.

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The research objective of the present project was to determine the relative impacts of disposal of human wastes on vegetation and soils in Tasmanian vegetation types that occur in areas used for wild country camping, with particular emphasis on the impact of digging, the impact of nutrient accessions, the persistence of  paper products, such as tissues, and the disturbance of burials by native animals.

by Jamie Kirkpatrick and Kerry Bridle

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Human Waste Contamination at Huts and Campsites in the Back Country of Tasmania

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The introduction of a minimal impact bushwalking (MIB) education campaign has alerted walkers to preferred behavioural practices in natural environments. However, despite the introduction of this campaign in Tasmania in 1987, there are still issues relating to visitor impact in back-country environments. The impact of visitors on the natural environment is often measured in terms of vegetation loss or track erosion. Impacts dealing with water quality issues have also been researched to a lesser degree. However, despite the visual impact of  inadequately buried human faeces at campsites, there has been very little work done on the extent of this problem, and on associated health risks.

by Kerry Bridle, Jamie Kirkpatrick and Julie von Platen

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