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Following discussions within the Tourism and Climate Change Taskforce in 2007–2008, STCRC decided to undertook a study of the potential adaptations to climate change in five key tourist destinations in Australia: Kakadu National Park, the Cairns region (including the Great Barrier Reef and Wet Tropics rainforest), the Blue Mountains, the Barossa Valley and the Victorian Alps.  The research project examines existing knowledge on anticipated biophysical changes and, through primary research (stakeholder interviews and social learning workshops), gauges the expected adaptive approaches of destination communities and the tourism sector to these changes for 2020, 2050 and 2070. It then estimates likely economic consequences. This technical report presents the research findings in full and supports the summary developed by STCRC.

by Stephen Turton, Wade Hadwen and Robyn Wilson (editors)

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The National Climate Change Adaptation Framework identified tourism as one key sector vulnerable to the impacts of climate change in Australia. This paper evaluates how nine government tourism agencies are responding to the issue of climate change in Australia.     It critically evaluates how government tourism agencies are addressing climate change issues, by promoting carbon reduction initiatives and carbon offsetting schemes for tourism operators.

by Heather Zeppel & Narelle Beaumont, University of Southern Queensland Australian Centre for Sustainable Business & Development

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Davos Declaration: Climate Change and Tourism Responding to Global Challenges

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Signed at the 2nd International Conference on Climate Change and Tourism in Davos, Switzerland on 3 October 2007, The Davos Declaration underscores that the tourism sector must rapidly respond to climate change, within the evolving UN framework if it is to grow in a sustainable manner. The Declaration recognises that tourism sector has an important place in that framework, given its global economic and social value, its role in sustainable development and its strong relationships with climate.

UNWTO Davos Declaration

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This research bibliography is about climate change impacts and responses in Australian tourism. It lists articles, reports, conference papers and website information published about climate change and Australian tourism from 1996 to 2010. It includes sections on climate change issues relevant to accommodation and aviation, carbon footprints of Australian tourism, carbon offsets in Australian tourism, conference papers and journal articles relating to climate change and tourism, along with research by the Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre (STCRC) about climate change impacts on destinations and reducing emissions in tourism accommodation.

by Heather Zeppel & Narelle Beaumont, University of Southern Queensland Australian Centre for Sustainable Business & Development

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USQ-Climate-Change-and-Australian-Tourism-June-2011-1

 

 

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Interpretation Evaluation Tool Kit: Methods and Tools for Assessing Effectiveness of face-to-face Interpretive Programs

Categories: Management, Manual, Monitoring & Evaluation, Report, Return
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Being able to document the achievements of your interpretive program influences not only budgets and financial decisions, but it also provides benchmarks needed for monitoring and continually improving the interpretive services and products you offer. The Tool Kit contains 11 indicators that were chosen based upon the expressed priorities of a range of industry partners.

by Sam H. Ham and Betty Weiler

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Interpretation Evaluation Tool Kit: Methods and Tools for Assessing Effectiveness of face-to-face Interpretive ProgramsToo

 

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Visitors are an integral element of any tourism product or service. This report provides detailed, reliable and relevant information on visitors needed to provide a sustainable tourism activity that provides a quality experience for visitors.

by Gianna Moscardo, Barbara Woods and Tanya Greenwood

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Understanding Visitor Perspectives on Wildlife Tourism

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This report considers the role of wildlife tourism in the Australian domestic market through a study based on a telephone interview survey of 1356 respondents from all over Australia. The aims of this study were to assess the role and significance of wildlife experiences within the Australian domestic tourism market; establish a typology of domestic wildlife tourists through market segmentation and develop market profiles; and examine motivations for and satisfaction levels with wildlife encounters amongst domestic wildlife tourists.

by Liz Fredline

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An Analysis of the Domestic Wildlife Tourism Market in Australia

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The research in this report was an investigation of the criteria pertinent to establishing a destination brand. The research project investigated the role of destination brand and image as a motivator for destination vacation choice.  The project made a comparison of two destinations, the Gold Coast and Melbourne, Australia.

by Hugh Wilkins, Bill Merrilees, Carmen Herington

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80083_Wilkins_

 

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Detecting Visitor Impacts in and around Aquatic Ecosystems within Protected Areas

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In this study, we sought to evaluate: a) the range of activities undertaken by visitors to aquatic ecosystems and the likely ecological consequences of those activities, and b) the sensitivity and scale of response of existing aquatic indicators. By combining these two evaluations, we collated a list of aquatic indicators that might be responsive to the spatial and temporal disturbances associated with visitor activities in particular, and as such, might show considerable promise in being further developed and implemented in monitoring and assessment programs within protected areas.

by Wade L Hadwen, Angela H Arthington, Paul I Boon

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80076 Cover

 

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