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All posts tagged Sustainable Tourism

“Sustainability” has been a buzzword for at least the past two decades, a fuzzy term that seems to refer to just about anything a person, group or government agency does that is perceived as good for the environment.

But there are organizations that have developed some hard and fast definitions of sustainability, chief among them the Global Sustainable Tourism Council, which started as a program of the United Nations before going off on its own. Richard Anderson. Read more.

 

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The United Nations Department of Public Information recently held a conference titled “Beyond 2015: An Action Agenda by Non-governmental organizations” at U.N. Headquarters in New York. One of the key purposes of the conference was to provide input for the UN Post-2015 Development Agenda proposed sustainable development goals (SDGs) that will succeed the 15-year framework of UN Millennium Development Goals, set to expire in 2015. Dr. Dave Randle. Read more.

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Eat, Stay, Buy Locally: Treading Lightly on the Road

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Between the intricate shrines of Angkor Wat, the diverse landscapes of the countryside and the kindness of its people — and despite the horrors of its recent history — Cambodia knocks a lot of people off their feet. It certainly had that effect on me when I first visited a few years ago and then again when I returned this winter. Yet it was impossible not to notice the school-age children begging barefoot at the major tourist sites, underage local women escorting Western men on sex tours, and the proliferation of seemingly unsustainable large-scale resorts being built on the pristine southern coast.

It’s a classic traveler’s question, one that is especially pronounced in developing or poor countries: Is your visit to a destination ultimately helping or hurting the place and its people? Is it possible to travel ethically in such places? By Ondine Cohane. Read more.

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With over 400 species of sharks inhabiting almost every aquatic ecosystem, divers and wildlife enthusiast are enjoying and paying good money to view sharks in their natural habitats. Operations to take tourists to view, dive or snorkel with sharks and rays are located across the globe.

A recent study found that shark tourism companies operate in 83 locations in 29 countries (Gallagher and Hammerschlag 2011).  Divers are very interested in seeing sharks alive and healthy in the ocean and are willing to pay a lot to see them (White 2008). In Fiji, Vianna et al. (2011) estimated that 78% of all divers visiting the country in 2010 engaged in shark-diving activities. By ‘Shark Savers’. Read more.

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As I read through the extensive messaging from the travel press at this time of year, one thing stands out in my mind: that responsible travel, ecotourism, and agritourism are increasing in popularity every day. There is a convergence of ecotravel and luxe in places which were once solely back-packers’ havens. Years ago, who would have expected a luxury eco-inn in Newfoundland? But that is precisely what the Fogo Island Inn, designed by Ilse Crawford, has accomplished with flair with its artistic collaborations and a pervading sense of natural drama. Other good examples are the Pikaia Lodge, which is located on a large tortoise reserve in the Galapagos Islands, and Bale Mountain lodge in Central Ethiopia, which has an in-house naturalist to help guests understand the five distinct habitats which make up the park, home to rare animals like the black-maned lions. By Pamela Lanier. Read more

Fogo Island Inn, Newfoundland. Source: ‘E Turbo News’
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The 7th edition of Responsible Tourism in Destinations conference will take place in Barcelona, Spain, this coming week (October 1-4th). As keynote speaker, I have been asked to address how social networks can contribute to a more responsible tourism. Here are some thoughts I will be sharing with the audience on October 4th. A couple of months ago, during a Linkedin group discussion, someone recommended that I read a new book that had been recently published: “Overbooked – The Exploding Business of Travel and Tourism“, by author and journalist Elizabeth Becker. By Frederic Gonzalo. Read more.

 

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Keynote speaker Professor Regina Scheyvens addressed the role of corporate social responsibility in the tourism industry, as the annual Council for Australasian University Tourism and Hospitality Education (CAUTHE) conference entered its second day (Wednesday 13 February) at Lincoln University last week. Now in its 23rd year, the CAUTHE conference has attracted over 200 experts from all over the world to discuss issues around tourism and global change. Lincoln University Adjunct Associate Professor of Sustainable Tourism Susanne Becken says with increasing globalisation, the role and responsibility of the corporation has become a key issue in the sector. By Lincoln University. Read more.

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Creating greater awareness of the consequences of tourism in Macao and the legacy that will be passed on to the next generation – increasing responsible behaviour within tourism development

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We are constantly confronted on the news now of issues of global warming and destruction of natural habitats and resources. How tourism is managed and planned will also have consequences on the environment and the communities within this. The United Nations Environment Programme in 1995 stated sustainable consumption as ‘the use of services and related products which respond to basic needs and bring a better quality of life while minimizing the use of natural resources and toxic materials as well as the emissions of waste and pollutants over the life-cycle so as not to jeopardize the needs of future generations.’ — Glenn McCartney. Read more.

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