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You’ve heard the letters S, D, and G being used a lot lately, but what do they mean? In this week’s PATA Sustain’s green tips, we are passing along our top tips that can help you do your part to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

   1. Knowledge is power

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development aims to shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path. The United Nations have set a supremely ambitious and transformational vision to realize the human rights of all and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environmental. Therefore, the first step for us to be involved is to read and understand as much we as can. We understand that most people do not have the patience to read reports that are over 40 pages long. So here is an article by The Guardian on Sustainable development goals: all you need to know. If that is still too much for you, watch a short clip about the SDGs here.

Don’t stop there though, follow the UN Sustainable Development Goals platform on Facebook here. PATA also has a free publication available for download: The Olive Tree, which explores how the SDGs and travel and tourism are interlinked. Educate yourself on the problems that happen all over the world and learn from the best practices!

   2. Support your government and companies in your country

The UN provides substantive support and capacity building for the SDGs and their related thematic issues, including water, energy, climate, oceans, urbanization, transport, science and technology, and many more. It won’t take you long to realise that these issues may already be impacting your neighborhood. In order to make the 2030 agenda a reality, we need the commitment from all stakeholders, especially the ones that are closest to us.

This brings us back to tip #1: Knowledge. Start by finding out if your government has integrated the SDGs into the country development plan. See this full list of countries that are involved in the UN’s Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs). TheVNRs aim to facilitate the sharing of experiences between nations, including success, challenges and lessons learned. If your country is listed, chances are your government or local organisations already have events planned in efforts to support the SDGs. For example, Green Fins Thailand, an initiative by United Nations and Reef-World Foundation, contributes to the Sustainable Development Goals 14 (Life Below Water) and 12 (Sustainable Consumption and Production) by carrying out regular beach and coastal clean-ups. This is also a great opportunity for local communities to be involved.

 

3. The time is now

If you don’t already work for an organisation that fully supports the SDGs, you can still do your part by volunteering! Join the Scholars of Sustenance Foundation team to go on food runs to contribute to Goal 2 (Zero Hunger). If you simply cannot find the time to do, you may be surprised at just how easy it is for you to make a change. Contribute to Goal 13 (Climate Action) by reducing food waste to landfill.

If gender equality is of big importance to you, contribute to Goal 2 (Gender Equality) by supporting the rights of domestic workers in your home and community. Did you know that tens and millions of women and girls are employed in a private household? Despite their important roles, they are among the most exploited and abused workers in the world. Visit “My Fair Home” to take a pledge!

Did you know?

Every year, the UN SDG Action Award recognises individuals, civil society organizations, subnational governments, foundations, networks, private sector leaders who are advancing the global movement for the Sustainable Development Goals in the most transformative, impactful and innovative way. The winners will be announced at a special SDG Action Awards ceremony, at the Global Festival of Action on 2 May.

Keep a look out for award nominees by following their facebook page.

In a nutshell, the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. We must continue to address the global challenges that the world is currently facing. We need to wake up and realise that human behaviour is the main reason for our increasingly volatile planet. Together, we can make a change.

Read more of #PATASustain green tips here.

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From New York’s High Line park to new affordable housing in Oakland, a debate over the accessibility of green design has taken root. Credit: Shutterstock/Stuart Monk

 

In East Oakland, a few blocks from the home of the champion Golden State Warriors basketball team, a series of geometric buildings and well-tended green spaces cut a striking contrast to the overgrown vacant lots, industrial equipment yards and aging corner stores that dot the neighborhood.

Tassafaronga Village, a six-year-old, $52.8 million LEED Gold housing redevelopment project, is also an example of the tradeoffs that can emerge in the push to make cities more sustainable — not just environmentally, but also socially and economically.

From Miami to New York, Houston to Oakland, the term “climate gentrification” is on the rise.

 

Learn about climate gentrification here:

 

By Lauren Hepler on GreenBiz

 

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Ten countries that protect their environment and respect human rights

Chile_made the list of the ten most ethical travel destinations for 2017

Chile made the list of the ten most ethical travel destinations for 2017, in part due to its expanding solar industry in places like the Atacama Desert, pictured above. Photo credit: Danielle Pereira / Flickr

Travel is more than an opening for good will, writes Ethical Traveller. It is one of the world’s most powerful economic engines, and can drive the way countries treat their citizens, indigenous peoples, wildlife and the environment. Travel is the world’s largest industry, with a trillion-dollar annual footprint. This means that travelers have enormous power. Where we put our footprints has reverberations reaching far beyond our personal experience. By “voting with our wings” – choosing our destinations well and cultivating our roles as citizen diplomats – we can help to change the world for the better.

Every year, Ethical Traveler reviews the policies and practices of over one hundred developing nations. We then select the ten that are doing the most impressive job of promoting human rights, preserving the environment and supporting social welfare – all while creating a lively, community-based tourism industry. By visiting these countries, we can use our economic leverage to reward good works and support best practices.

 


The Winners
Ethical Traveler congratulates the countries on our 2017 list of The World’s Ten Best Ethical Destinations. The winners, in alphabetical order (not in order of merit), are:

  • Belize
  • Cabo Verde
  • Chile
  • Costa Rica
  • Dominica
  • Mongolia
  • Palau
  • Tonga
  • Uruguay
  • Vanuatu

By Ethical Traveller. Find out how the list is created – click here to read the original article.

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2015-07-11-1436582396-8160478-01UNWTO-thumb

Image Source: The Huffington Post

The HLPF (High Level Political Forum) on sustainable development is the main United Nations platform on sustainable development. It provides political leadership, guidance and recommendations. It follows up and reviews the implementation of sustainable development commitments. It addresses new and emerging challenges; promotes the science-policy interface and enhances the integration of economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. By Dr. Dave Randle. Read more.

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The assessment tool (phase 2) provides readers with tools, exercises and interrogating questions to better understand tourism management issues in their local destination. this is achieved through the presentation of activities and questions and through the inclusion of vignettes and stories of practice that may inspire alternative approaches to tourism management.

by Dianne Dredge, Jim Macbeth, Dean Carson, Narelle Beaumont, Jeremy Northcote, and Fiona Richards
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The aim of the guide is to investigate the issues that local governments face in tourism management and the practices and approaches that have been adopted to address these issues. An investigation and appreciation of these issues is necessarily the first stage in moving towards more sustainable local tourism management.

by Dianne Dredge, Jim Macbeth, Dean Carson, Narelle Beaumont, Jeremy Northcote, and Fiona Richards

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Dredge_LTM-Phase-1

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The research project conducted fieldwork in a number of case studies in metropolitan and regional and rural areas of New South Wales and Victoria in order to investigate and explore the intersection between traditional and new cultural landscape precincts and the current and future patterns of Australian tourism. Cultural landscapes of tourism are diverse in character. This project compared the more ‘traditional’ cultural tourist precinct of Sydney’s Art Gallery of New South Wales and Woolloomooloo Finger Wharf with the cosmopolitan cultural diversity of ethnic precincts including Sydney’s and Melbourne’s Chinatown and Melbourne’s Little Italy, Lygon Street.
by Jock Collins, Simon Darcy, Kirrily Jordan, Ruth Skilbeck, Simone Grabowski, Vicki Peel, David Dunstan, Gary Lacey, and Tracey Firth
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This report explores the way in which some key drivers could affect the tourism industry, both international and domestic, to the year 2020. An exploration of these trends allows important change agents, on both the supply side and the demand side of tourism, to be highlighted and discussed, strategies formulated by destination managers, and tourism operators to develop tourism in a sustainable way. While the implications extend to all tourism destinations and operations, the focus is on Australia in particular.

by Larry Dwyer, Deborah Edwards, Nina Mistilis, Carolina Roman, Noel Scott and Chris Cooper

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Megatrends Underpinning Tourism to 2020: Analysis of Key Drivers for Change

 

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This report provides the latest information about the characteristics and behaviours of visitors for the tourism industry, managers, and other research projects based in the Ningaloo Coastal Region. The Ningaloo Destination Modelling (NDM) project is a collaborative project between researchers from seven Australian universities and Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre that will deliver a scenario planning tool that assesses the social, environmental and economic impact of tourism planning strategies in order to assist tourism planning in a region that relies on its unique natural attractions.

by Tod Jones, Michael Hughes, David Wood, Anna Lewis and Philippa Chandler

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Ningaloo Coast Region Visitor Statistics: Collected for the Ningaloo Destination Modelling Project

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The report develops tools for measuring and enhancing the yield from tourism at the business, regional and national level. It clarifies the different concepts of tourism yield. Different stakeholders (operators, governments, community, researchers etc.) mean different things by ‘yield’ and this presents a barrier to communication and policy discussion.

by Larry Dwyer, Peter Forsyth, Liz Fredline, Leo Jago, Marg Deery and Sven Lundie

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