PATA | Contact

All posts tagged Responsible Tourism

 

September 08 2015 – The Wild Asia Responsible Tourism Awards are an opportunity for shining stars in sustainability to gain international recognition for their efforts to create better places to live and better places to visit. The Winners represent leadership in commitment to benefiting their local communities and natural environment, whilst providing authentic and meaningful travel experiences for visitors from around the world. Wild Asia Read more.

As a socially responsible business, Banyan Tree was founded with the core value of driving sustainable development.    With the call to arms of embracing the environment and empowering people, the Company seeks to continue being an agent of social and economic development through responsible tourism. Banyan Tree’s triple bottom line (economy, society and environment) helps direct the Company’s sustainable development by inspiring associates, guests, and partners to take a wider consideration encompassing a long-term view when making business decisions.

by Banyan Tree Holdings Limited

Download

Growing Sustainability: Banyan Tree Holdings Limited Sustainability Report 2009

×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7
Share

Eat, Stay, Buy Locally: Treading Lightly on the Road

Categories: Recommended Reading
Comments Off on Eat, Stay, Buy Locally: Treading Lightly on the Road

Between the intricate shrines of Angkor Wat, the diverse landscapes of the countryside and the kindness of its people — and despite the horrors of its recent history — Cambodia knocks a lot of people off their feet. It certainly had that effect on me when I first visited a few years ago and then again when I returned this winter. Yet it was impossible not to notice the school-age children begging barefoot at the major tourist sites, underage local women escorting Western men on sex tours, and the proliferation of seemingly unsustainable large-scale resorts being built on the pristine southern coast.

It’s a classic traveler’s question, one that is especially pronounced in developing or poor countries: Is your visit to a destination ultimately helping or hurting the place and its people? Is it possible to travel ethically in such places? By Ondine Cohane. Read more.

Share

Voluntourism is under fire. I know, because I have been a part of pointing out the unintended negative consequences of our good intentions for some time. Recently, blogs about “the problem of little white girls and boys” and other rants about voluntourism are starting to get more and more popular. But maybe it’s time to look further into this criticism. In a piece on his new Voluntourism Institute blog, David Clemmons recently released an article exploring the exploitation of voluntourism itself. It resonated with me, as over the last few months I have read a number of “anti-voluntourism” pieces that people have sent me thinking I’d love them, but instead they made me really worried that these arguments are moving off point. By Daniela Papi. Read more.

Share

The 7th edition of Responsible Tourism in Destinations conference will take place in Barcelona, Spain, this coming week (October 1-4th). As keynote speaker, I have been asked to address how social networks can contribute to a more responsible tourism. Here are some thoughts I will be sharing with the audience on October 4th. A couple of months ago, during a Linkedin group discussion, someone recommended that I read a new book that had been recently published: “Overbooked – The Exploding Business of Travel and Tourism“, by author and journalist Elizabeth Becker. By Frederic Gonzalo. Read more.

 

Share

I have just read a report titled The Global Wellness Tourism Economy 2013, and it has made me optimistic for the potential growth of responsible tourism. It has made me see that there are many more travelers out there for responsible tourism companies to connect to. And it has given me some insight into how we might go about reaching them.

The wellness tourist is anyone who travels with the desire to improve their physical, emotional and spiritual well being. In other words, it is about much more than just people who go to spas. For example, the report defines what wellness tourists look for as “Healthy Living”. “Rejuvenation and Relaxation” and “Meaning and Connection”. “Authentic Experiences” Which responsible tourism operator doesn’t aspire to offer these?

Screenshot 2014-04-16 13.59.55

The report also gives examples of the sort activities these tourists enjoy: hiking, biking, walking along nature trails, volunteering, connecting to arts, culinary experiences. All the same sorts of activities that many – if not most – responsible tourism companies offer. Now consider that Wellness Tourism is already reckoned to be a $439bn market, worth one in seven of every tourist dollars. And it is forecast to grow to $678bn by 2017. Meanwhile, your typical wellness tourist spends 130 per cent more than the average global tourist while on a trip.

Although the two sectors are in no way synonymous, the one key difference that I see is that responsible tourism talks primarily about the impacts of travel upon those outside of us – the community and the environment, while Wellness focuses on the impacts upon the traveler. The issues that cause these impacts – pollution, overcrowded cities, industrialized agriculture, economic disparities etc – are the same. The report even spells out how interwoven our two sectors are, when it describes “core wellness consumers [are those] who embrace holistic and integrated approaches to health, as well as environmental and sustainability issues, recognizing that personal, social and planetary well being are all interconnected.”

Although the main focus of each sector may be different, the fact that these core consumers are seeking an ‘integrated approach’ suggests there is merit in looking to learn from what one another does well. And where I really think Responsible Tourism can really learn from Wellness Tourism is by studying the way it connects the stories of what it offers with consumers. Because by talking to people where they are – connecting what we offer to their needs, desires and worries about their own lives – we stand the best chance of exciting them about our trips.

At its simplest, compare the way the two sectors might talk to a tourist in their bathroom. Responsible Tourism puts a little card on the basin that asks the traveler to help saving the planet by not washing their towel. Wellness Tourism offers them a natural bath soap created by local artisans using traditional herbs known in the region for their curative properties.

Both of these approaches can impact positively on the world outside the bathroom. But I believe the latter resonates far more richly with most travelers – whether it is deeper meaning they seek, or a deeper bath.

Originally Published as Why the growth of Wellness Tourism is good for the responsible tourism market by

Share

Creating greater awareness of the consequences of tourism in Macao and the legacy that will be passed on to the next generation – increasing responsible behaviour within tourism development

Categories: Recommended Reading
Comments Off on Creating greater awareness of the consequences of tourism in Macao and the legacy that will be passed on to the next generation – increasing responsible behaviour within tourism development

We are constantly confronted on the news now of issues of global warming and destruction of natural habitats and resources. How tourism is managed and planned will also have consequences on the environment and the communities within this. The United Nations Environment Programme in 1995 stated sustainable consumption as ‘the use of services and related products which respond to basic needs and bring a better quality of life while minimizing the use of natural resources and toxic materials as well as the emissions of waste and pollutants over the life-cycle so as not to jeopardize the needs of future generations.’ — Glenn McCartney. Read more.

Share