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Earth Day, Saturday, 22 April, is all about environmental protection.

 

We’ve all heard about the 3Rs (reduce, reuse, recycle), which help to reduce pollution caused by waste, conserve natural resources, save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Many industries, including the tourism sector, are big contributors to environmental pollution; however, with proper waste management, a business can improve its business reputation, reduce waste costs and save energy. Reducing the amount of used paper in the offices can make a considerable positive impact.

 

Here are some ideas on how to reduce your paper waste in the office, even after Earth Day:

 

  1. Share files internally:

With Google Docs you can work simultaneously with colleagues on a document or spreadsheet. That means you do not need to share printed papers anymore. Other programmes that offering interactive document editing features include Microsoft Office 365 and Basecamp. For file storage and sharing, Dropbox or WeTransfer are popular options.

 

  1. Multitask:

Consider to invest in a dual or multi-monitor setup. According to the CIO Magazine and the Kyocera Environmental Survey 2011 employees print documents for cross-referencing them with another document. Giving employees more screens can also boost productivity at the same time. LCD monitors typically outlast computer upgrades, so this is one cost you’ll only need to pay once.

 

  1. Communicate with staff:

Explain to staff why it is important to minimise paper use and encourage them to join in the movement. Perhaps a competition that tracks the number of pages printed per person and shared with the team can be implemented and can incentivise staff to use less paper. Of course, this works best if staff are supported with paper saving facilities (online document stores, dual monitors, etc.).

 

  1. Make printing inconvenient:

An easy but effective way to save paper may be to reduce the number printers or paper available. Without fewer available printers in the office, employees are more likely to print less. This tactic can also help to save printer costs.

 

Sometimes, printing is absolutely necessary. Follow these rules for eco-friendly printing.

 

Successfully reducing the use of paper is a not done overnight. It takes effort and continuous education to move away from paper and establish a culture that shuns waste. Adopting the right tools can go a long way toward creating an environment to support a paperless office.

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'green' events planning

In line with 2017 International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development, it is important that we take steps towards implementing sustainability in our day-to-day activities. This includes events – a major component of our industry.


There are many things that event planners, service providers and meeting participants may do as a means of contributing to sustainable and responsible event management.

Here are a few simple ‘green’ meeting tips:

1. Use online registration to reduce paper usage

Forget about archaic paper registration methods. Use an online registration tool. Online registration and ticketing not only eliminates excess printed materials but also saves time. Participants love being able to register from any device at any time. Check out Eventbrite, an example of a low-cost online event registration mobile app that can be used to promote and manage your event events.

2. Use electronic communication and marketing

Save a tree by going digital. Send out invitations, real time information, announcements and updates through online media and other online channels. electronic devicesDraw attention to eco-friendly aspects of your event with digital signage and information.

3. Choose a green venue

The venues, and their facilities, have a huge impact on the sustainability of your event. Consider first whether the building itself is certified, for example, by the US Green Building Council. Select an event site that’s easily accessible by foot, bicycle or public transport. This reduces the carbon footprint of your event. If your event is attracting international delegates, give them ‘green’ hotel options.

4. Encourage sustainable transportation

Choose energy efficient, hybrid or electric vehicles for your event. Encourage delegates to travel by public transportation by making it easy for them to navigate. As an alternative, set up carpool service (e.g. liftshare.com) or shuttle bus service for your attendees. Find out more about how to commute in an eco-friendly way; check out 30 ideas on green event transportation.

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5. Recycle and reduce waste at events

Provide bins for recycling and composting to minimise waste-to-landfill. Make recycling stations highly visible and accessible. Liaise with the venue management team about arrangements for composting food waste and donating any excess food to local charities.

6. Minimise energy use

Using natural light instead of artificial light reduces bills and helps the environment. Where electric lighting is required, make the switch to LED bulbs. Switch off lighting and equipment when it is not being used.

7. Go local

Use local vendors for ancillary services such as food, décor, gift items, and rentals. This reduces emissions and gives important support the local economies. Hire local staff to reduce travel times, costs and pollution.

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8. Inspire sustainable practices

Educate and inspire attendees by making your ‘green’ event practices highly visible to all stakeholders, including the public and the media. Encourage responsible behaviour among all stakeholders and foster understanding and appreciation of sustainability by adapting the PATA Responsible Business Travel Guidelines. Finally, check out our favourite 5 tips to become a responsible green delegate.

 

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Challenge Yourself – Have a Plastic Free July!

Categories: Green Tips
Comments Off on Challenge Yourself – Have a Plastic Free July!

Plastic Free July

Image Source: plasticfreejuly.org

Plastic is used daily, in the form of bags, bottles, packaging and many more. Sometimes we use plastic for only a brief moment to carry our groceries home or to drink a cup of coffee, but it can take up to 1000 years to decompose. Plastic is destructive for the environment, it lowers the fertility of our soils and is harmful for wildlife. More plastic has been produced in the first ten years of this century than its predecessor. So try to start reducing plastic waste by reusing daily plastic items and recycling.

Here are 8 ways to reduce plastic waste:

  • Purchase your own reusable bag
  • Don’t use straws
  • Buy boxes instead of bottles for laundry detergent for example
  • Use Reusable containers to pack your food
  • Purchase your reusable bottle
  • Make your own juices, healthier and no packaging
  • Talk to others on how they can reduce plastic waste
  • If you own a store, offer a discount to those with reusable bags or put a price on plastic bags to remind everyone that these are bad for the environment

What Are You Doing For Plastic-Free July?

Learn more about how to reduce the amount of plastic in the environment with these 17 tips to use less plastic. For more tips on how to make this plastic free July most successful click here!

Take action and join the Plastic Free July Challenge now; a challenge accessible to everyone to educate us on how to reduce plastic waste.

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Spring has sprung, the warmer weather is finally here, and cleaning projects have begun at home and in the office. But, does the dust tickle your nose, or does the smell of cleaning products make you apprehensive, perhaps worried about what you are breathing in? Have no fear – below are some easy solutions to make your spring cleaning healthier and greener.

 

  1. Make your own homemade green cleaning solutions
  2. Add plants to your indoor space to help clean your air
  3. Get rid of clutter by donating, recycling, or upcycling unwanted items
  4. Ditch the paper products for reusable cloths (old t-shirts that can be washed)
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Secondhand doesn’t mean second best…

Categories: Green Tips
Comments Off on Secondhand doesn’t mean second best…

secondhand2

… it means previously loved! Consider buying items from a secondhand store for a fun and thrifty way to refresh your wardrobe or decorate your home. Items such as electronics, clothing, furniture, can be resold or upcycled, keeping perfectly useful items in good condition out of our landfills. Secondhand stores often sell items in excellent condition, and will generally buy or take them back when you no longer need them.

Organisations such as Goodwill, which helps people with barriers to employment learn kills and find competitive jobs, or the Salvation Army, which raises money for its social and humanitarian programs through its thrift stores, are truly economical places to shop! As they say, one (wo)man’s trash is another (wo)man’s treasure. Here are some tips to help you start shopping.

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As a major hotel in Hong Kong, Eaton Hotel understands their responsibility to understand, reflect upon and change processes and policies that have the potential to inflict harm on the environment, communities and future generations.

by EarthCheck Pty Ltd

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EarthCheck Case Study: Eaton Hotel, Hong Kong

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