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All posts tagged Recreation

When visiting National Parks, the best way to be a responsible traveller is to follow the rules and regulations. After all, they are there for a good reason – your protection. Respect posted rules and remind others to do so if necessary and appropriate by politely reminding fellow visitors to notice and follow the park’s rules to contribute to continued preservation. Report any signs of vandalism or misbehaviour to park rangers. Parks’ visitor centres are a good resource for information on regulations as well as for available trails. Here are some more ways to enjoy a responsible national park visit.

  1. Stick to indicated trails to ensure that the ecosystem is not harmed and the environment as well as you stays safe. Though some parks may allow off trail or cross country experiences, it is not a general rule so do your research on regulations and rules for the recreational area you are visiting. If you are bringing pets, make sure the trail allows it, and be sure to keep them leashed and that you clean up after them. You may also consult local authorities or park rangers on site. If you feel more adventurous or if there are too many visitors on the trails, you may want to choose a backcountry adventure.
  2. Avoid removing seeds or shells, damaging corals or picking flowers to not have a negative impact on nature. Enjoy watching the wildlife instead of feeding it to not intervener with their natural way of sourcing food.
  3. If you are planning on camping in a national park, make sure to check the local camping regulations and prepare your campground meals in advance. Bringing your ingredients in reusable containers (including your reusable water bottle) will help to reduce waste. In case you still produce waste, ensure that it goes in the correct bins or take it back with you if no suitable disposal is available. Read more of our tips for responsible camping and RVing.
  4. Use the park’s shuttle services for transportation if available instead of driving yourself. You will be able to enjoy more of the scenery and worry less about traffic or parking. They are also a great way to get around if you are planning a one-way hike.

Read more about the right behaviour in national parks here, stay safe and enjoy your visit!

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This study defines and explores the nature of impact creep within the context of two contrasting case studies. The methods applied in undertaking this study consisted of a literature review and development and distribution of questionnaires to visitors at Monkey Mia and an interview of managers at Monkey Mia and Tree Top Walk. The project considered impact creep relevant to both public and private facility developments.

by Amanda J. Smith and David Newsome

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Investigation into the Concept of and Factors Leading to Impact Creep and its Management

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This tool guides you to make a preliminary assessment about whether your region and property have the attributes for a successful tourism venture. If, after taking this initial assessment, you find that your property has tourism potential then we recommend you visit the websites listed on page 9.  Stage 2 allows you to make a more thorough assessment of whether to proceed with your tourism business idea and helps you develop this idea into a full business plan, and will be available in the future.

by Carolyn Fausnaugh, Paul Waight, Karen Higginbottom & Chelsea Northrope

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Farm & Country Tourism on Your Property: Stage 1 Assessment Tool

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Accommodation, transport and recreation facilities are key components of a major tourism destination, the Gold Coast. Plans for improving the overall attraction of a destination need to be based on detailed information highlighting the current state of such infrastructure. PLEASE NOTE: Graphics within are not of a high quality.

 

by Jan Warnken
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The study’s primary objective was to measure the economic impact of tourists’ expenditure in the Australian Alps, on the economies of the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales and Victoria.  The project involved measuring tourism expenditure in the Alps region and the associated multiplier effects of that expenditure.  The economic impact is shown in terms of Gross State Product (GSP) and employment/jobs that are attributed to tourism to each of the states’ Alps national parks.

by Trevor Mules, Pam Faulks, Natalie Stoeckl and Michele Cegielski

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Economic Value of Tourism in the Australian Alps

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This report attempts to provide an indicative estimate of the size and scope of cycle tourism in Australia. First, the report outlines the key facilitators of cycle tourism before outlining the market segments that can be considered part of cycle tourism, and provides an analysis of the size and scale of cycle tourism internationally. The report then outlines the potential economic, social and environmental benefits for Australia based on previous international research. The report then outlines the potential size and scope of market segments from published and unpublished data gathered from tour operators, event organisers, cycling organisations and industry associations. It ends with a conclusion and recommendations. It should be noted that this report was undertaken under a short timeframe and therefore there may be some gaps in the data and information presented.

by Pam Faulks, Brent Ritchie, and Martin Fluker
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The main objectives of this project are to examine regional visitation to Melbourne and its metropolitan parks, to study the main factors that could function as constraints to such visitation and to produce a number of  recommendations, so as to enhance visitation in the future. Parks in this study include those metropolitan parks operated by Parks Victoria in the suburbs and immediate  hinterland of Melbourne. Also grouped with parks for the purpose of this study are major cultural sites like Werribee Mansion and local metropolitan bays and piers like Port Phillip Bay and Frankston Pier.

by Peter Murphy, Sharyn McDonald and Kerasia Seiragaki

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Regional Visitation to Melbourne and its Metropolitan Parks, Cultural Assets and Bays

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This study investigated the importance of aquatic ecosystems to tourism and recreation and assessed the potential and current impacts of this resource use on the sustainability of aquatic ecosystems in Australia. Through literature searches and the development of surveys we aimed to integrate current ‘on-the-ground’ activities with what is known of the impacts of tourism and recreation on aquatic ecosystems worldwide. We propose a suite of research and development priorities and opportunities arising from this that will enhance our understanding of ecosystem responses to tourism and recreation and facilitate the sustainable management of Australia’s in demand aquatic resources.

by Wade L. Hadwen, Angela H. Arthington, Paul I. Boon, Muriel Lepesteur and Arthur McComb

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Rivers, Streams, Lakes and Estuaries: Hot Spots for cool Recreation and Tourism in Australia

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This report provides an analysis of potential practical applications of current and upcoming IT-based (digital) monitoring and surveillance systems and technology in other industry sectors for use in Australian terrestrial and marine protected areas. The knowledge generated will provide a basis for the potential future development of reliable and cost-effective methods for monitoring visitor movements and activities, and compliance with park regulations (including user pay systems).

by Jan Warnken and Michael Blumenstein

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Monitoring Visitor Use in Australian Terrestrial and Marine Protected Areas

 

 

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In light of the rapidly growing tourism industry in the region, excessive tourist use of the dune lakes on Fraser Island could deleteriously affect their ecology and in turn, their aesthetic appeal to tourists. The findings from this research study suggest that the current level of tourist pressure on the perched dune lakes on Fraser Island is likely to have a significant long-term impact on the ecological health of these systems.

by Wade Hadwen, Angela Arthington, Stuart Bunn and Thorsten Mosisch

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Effects of Tourism on Fraser Islands Dune Lakes

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