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Single-use plastic ban, food waste and local produce top priorities in Centara’s 2019 Sustainability Plan.

SOURCE: TRAVEL DAILY NEWS

The elimination of single-use plastic items is part of the “Centara Earth Care” programme. It is aimed at encouraging Centara hotel guests and tourists to be proactive about energy saving, waste reduction and sustainable environmental tourism. Read the full article here. 

Written by Theodore Koumelis 

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Credits: Tony Cenicola

If you’re tossing things in the recycling bin out of sheer hope, you might be an “aspirational recycler.”

To gain knowledge on whether you are recycling the right way, read the full article here.

By Livia Albeck-Ripka for New York Times.

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Credit: Shutterstock

Did you know?

Our planet cannot digest plastic

Plastic makes up about 90% of ocean pollution in the world

In China, 3 billion single-use plastic bags are used every day

The average plastic bag is only used for less than 15 minutes

 

The problem with plastic is that it’s inexpensive and therefore disposable. And when it’s so disposable, there is a lot of it, and a lot of litter, creating unsightly cities, and clogged and polluted waters.

 

We, the tourism industry, are dependent on clean oceans, pristine beaches, and ecological diversity. Local communities are dependent on fresh water and clean cities. It is time to take leadership and proactively reduce the use of plastic in the travel industry.

 

Here are some ways we can tackle plastic pollution in the tourism industry:

 

  1. Charge for it:

It can be difficult to change the legislation on plastic bans, but it isn’t impossible. Charging the customer an additional fee can be an incentive to reduce the demand for plastic products. Read more one the example of Ireland, who was able to reduce the plastic bag consumption by approximately 98 per cent within a week in 2007 by increasing the price for plastic bags.

 

  1. Replace your plastic products

 

  • Use only reusable glasses, mugs, and water bottles at conferences instead of plastic bottles
  • Simply do not allow plastic straws at your hotel or venue, or replace with biodegradable, paper, or bamboo straws
  • Replace single use toiletries with large pump bottles that can be refilled; replace plastic toothbrushes for giveaways with wooden ones
  • Initiate green meeting policies: check out this example

 

  1. Educate stakeholders, staff and travellers

Because everyone uses plastic, it is important to engage with every person involved in the business to educate them about the negative impacts of plastic use and how to make a positive, plastic-free change.

 

What to tell stakeholders:

Reducing plastic means reducing costs! Unnecessary material usage can be avoided, saving a lot of money in production and in waste management. Uptake of environmental management methods may attract new customers or partners who are seeking more environmental friendly businesses. Read more about the benefits of an environmental friendly business.

 

What to tell staff:

Employees play a very important role in doing the right thing with your business. It is important to understand that waste separation and the time and labour involved can not only be costly for the employer, but also very mundane for the worker. It is by no means a glamourous task, so actively reducing plastic means less work in the end. Often, particularly in an office environment, out of sight is out of mind. Once a person puts a piece of plastic is in the trash, they will never see it again. Help staff understand plastic’s lifecycle, and that reducing plastic can make an enormous impact on our planet and communities. Read more on how to engage employees in CSR.

 

What to tell my guests:

Empower your staff to teach guests about your company’s sustainability policy, as it relates to plastic. Explain why you are not using plastic straws or bags, and actively tell your story! Read more on communicating sustainability to guests.

 

Plastic is a global problem, but one that is being tackled all over the world. See how some African countries governments even banned the use of plastic, and consider how we can learn from this example. It is important to move proactive and be the change you wish to see in the Asia Pacific region.

 

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Michigan bans bans on plastic bags, takeout food containers, styrofoam cups and just about anything else

Categories: Americas, Planet, Recommended Reading
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Photo credit: Sarah Rice/Getty Images

Photo credit: Sarah Rice/Getty Images

Plastic bag bans are about a lot more than just banning plastic bags; A few years ago, Adam Sternbergh wrote a great article for New York Magazine, The Fight Over Plastic Bags Is About a Lot More Than How to Get Groceries Home, discussing bans on bans in Arizona:

Others see the skirmish as part of a larger war: The unending fight to combat government tyranny and protect the American Way.

Now the war has come to Michigan, where the state government has passed a law that bans bans on bags, prohibiting local governments from banning, regulating or imposing fees on the use of plastic bags and other containers. – By Lloyd Alter. Continue reading on Treehugger.

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Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali

Categories: Recommended Reading
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Melati and Isabel Wijsen: Our campaign to ban plastic bags in Bali

Image Source: TED

Plastic bags are essentially indestructible, yet they’re used and thrown away with reckless abandon. Most end up in the ocean, where they pollute the water and harm marine life; the rest are burned in garbage piles, where they release harmful dioxins into the atmosphere. Melati and Isabel Wijsen are on a mission to stop plastic bags from suffocating their beautiful island home of Bali. Melati and Isabel Wijsen.

Watch the video on TED.com!

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