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Etihad Airways flies the world’s first flight using fuel made in the UAE from plants

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Credits: Seat Guru

Khalifa University, Etihad Airways, Boeing, ADNOC, Safran, GE and BAUER Resources celebrate a major milestone in developing a comprehensive sustainable aviation fuel value chain.

To read the entire article press here.

Credits to Travel Daily News. Written by: Theodore Koumelis.

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A touch of green: Benefits of plants at your workspace

Categories: Green Tips
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Credit: Shutterstock

Work overload, stress, low level of productivity, and illness – these are workplace characteristics many of us have experienced or witnessed at some point in our life. Perhaps you and your colleagues currently are facing a challenging time. Have you considered brightening up your workspace with plants to boost productivity?

The beneficial effects of greenery at the workplace have been researched numerous times in the past. In fact, it has been scientifically proven that the number of indoor plants proximal to a worker’s desk had small but statistically reliable associations with a decrease in sick leave and an increase in productivity. Plants in closed environments not only provide you with cleaner air by removing chemicals emitted from computers and furniture and adding humidity to the atmosphere, they also release phytochemicals that suppress mould spores and bacteria. Nature has a great impact on your mood – looking at it can help your brain shift into a more relaxed mode and ultimately reduce stress. Study results from Australia have outlined significant drops in reported depression, anger and hostility as well as tension and anxiety after introducing office plants.

Did you know that Aloe Vera and Bamboo Palm are among the recommended air improving indoor plants? Learn more about which indoor plants keep your environment alive here. Looking specifically for low-light plants, desk plants or low maintenance options? Check out these recommendations.

Ready to take your productivity to the next level? Make use of the benefits of mother nature, get a plant and bring a touch of green to your desk and workspace.

Be sure to also check out our tips on greening your way to work and staying healthy at work.

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Guest blogger Jackie Edwards gives tips on how to make daily choices that help you to green up the air inside of your home.

Credit: Shutterstock

 

Studies show that the concentration of air pollutants can be two to five times higher inside than outside. Often, this is related to cooking practices. Molecules and toxin such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and particulates. These contaminants can cause health problems like headaches, dizziness, and chronic diseases.

As a population moving towards a greener future, it is vital that we think about the inside of our homes as well as the outside environment. For this reason, we want to cover tips on how to green up the air inside of your home. These daily choices can help you live a more sustainable, healthier lifestyle.

No Smoking Please

If you or someone in your household smokes cigarettes, a pipe, or cigars, consider making the rule that there is no smoking allowed inside. This household rule will help to keep the inside of your home free from the particulates that such smoking habits generate. Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) has been shown to contain approximately 4,000 compounds, at least 40 of which have been linked to cancer.

Cooking Ventilation

Do you cook or heat your home with solid materials such as wood or coal? The little particles and carbon monoxide gases emitted by cooking materials are sources of pollution in the home. Get into the habit of ventilating the places in your house where cooking is done. This habit will help you keep the air clean. Read more about clean cookstoves

House Plants Can Help

Plants can be thought of as filters for the air. Within the environmental movement, we often see people protecting forests or planting new trees because trees contribute to the greening of the Earth’s atmosphere. The air inside of our homes can also benefit from the greenery. Keep a small house tree or potted plants with plenty of green leaves.

Green Building Materials

The building materials used in your home’s construction will affect the air inside of your house. Whenever you add something to your environments, such as paint, carpet, insulation, flooring, or furniture, research the material first. Look for materials that have a low volatile organic compound (VOC) rating.

The air inside of your home can become polluted, just as the air over an entire city can be dense with smog. To keep the air inside of your home clean and pollutant free, you can work on building up a few healthy habits. Never allow smoking inside, and always keep your cooking area well ventilated. Include houseplants in your decorating scheme, and only use building materials, furniture, and paint that are safe and environmentally friendly.

 

See more of Jackie’s writing: 

A little closer to home: sustainable everyday life choices

A guide to sustainable travel for seniors

Beginning at home – the next generation of sustainable travelers

How to choose an eco-friendly hotel

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Protected area managers need to monitor the ecological effects of visitor use and assess their performance in managing visitor use. To assist this process, STCRC has established a series of projects to develop indicators and protocols for monitoring visitor use and its impacts that can be used as part of an integrated monitoring system for protected areas. This is the third report in a series examining terrestrial ecological impacts of visitor use.

by Wendy Hill and Catherine Pickering

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Evaluation of Impacts and Methods for the Assessment of Walking Tracks in Protected Areas

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This report is one of a series in the Sustainable Tourism Corporative Research Centre’s overall project to develop a framework, guidelines and tools to enhance assessment, evaluation and reporting of visitor use in protected areas.  In this manual three methods (including indicators, protocols and proformas) are presented for surveying and monitoring walking tracks based on a desktop evaluation of methods used overseas and in Australia  and field testing of methods by researchers.

by Wendy Hill and Catherine Pickering

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Manual for Assessing Walking Tracks in Protected Areas

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Impacts of Recreation & Tourism on Plants in Protected Areas in Australia

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This report reviews research into impacts of recreation and tourism on vegetation in Australian protected areas and identifies key areas for future research. A comprehensive literature review of Australian and overseas research on tourism and recreation impacts  on vegetation in protected areas was conducted. Discussions were held with industry including staff from park agencies, as well as researchers in recreational  ecology.

by Catherine Pickering and Wendy Hill

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