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All posts tagged national parks

This report focuses on risk management policies, risk identification procedures, incidents and claims, risk management training, risk inspections, legal advice, transfer of risk for commercial and non-commercial activities and restriction of liability.

by Ralf Buckley, Natasha Witting and Michaela Guest

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Managing People in Australian Parks - 3. Risk Management & Public Liability

 

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This project focused on the far west of New South Wales where the greatest densities of kangaroos are found and where large protected areas, especially Sturt National Park, are set aside for their conservation.

by David B. Croft

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Rangeland Kangaroos - A World Class Wildlife Experience

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To identify various places in Australia where tourists can have direct experiences of macropods in a natural habitat and to assess the likely quality of such an experience.

by David B. Croft and Neil Leiper

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Assessment Opportunities for International Tourism Based on Wild Kangaroos

 

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Off-road driving, horseriding, rock climbing and similar activities can be lucrative for tour operators and important for local recreational groups, but contentious for management of national parks and protected areas, both because of safety and liability and because of potentially high environmental impacts. This report examines management strategies for these activities worldwide and in Australia. Suggestions for best management practice and future research agendas are set.

by Carl Cater, Ralf Buckley, Robert Hales, David Newsome, Catherine Pickering and Amanda Smith

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As a socially responsible person, you probably want to make the world a little better. Even when you travel, you might try to visit undeveloped areas where your tourism dollars can help a local economy thrive. You might even contribute your time to the community as a volunteer. Ecotourism’s idealistic goal is to improve the world through responsible travel; while its effects will probably never match its ideals, travelers can offer very real benefits to local communities. Jessica Blue. Read more.

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The International Ecotourism Society, TIES, defines ecotourism as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.” The concept arose in the 1970s from the general global environmental movement, and by the 1990s was one of the fastest-growing tourism sectors. Ecotourism appeals to responsible travelers who want to minimize the negative impacts of their visit, and who take special interest in local nature and cultures. Carole Simm. Read more.

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