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When visiting National Parks, the best way to be a responsible traveller is to follow the rules and regulations. After all, they are there for a good reason – your protection. Respect posted rules and remind others to do so if necessary and appropriate by politely reminding fellow visitors to notice and follow the park’s rules to contribute to continued preservation. Report any signs of vandalism or misbehaviour to park rangers. Parks’ visitor centres are a good resource for information on regulations as well as for available trails. Here are some more ways to enjoy a responsible national park visit.

  1. Stick to indicated trails to ensure that the ecosystem is not harmed and the environment as well as you stays safe. Though some parks may allow off trail or cross country experiences, it is not a general rule so do your research on regulations and rules for the recreational area you are visiting. If you are bringing pets, make sure the trail allows it, and be sure to keep them leashed and that you clean up after them. You may also consult local authorities or park rangers on site. If you feel more adventurous or if there are too many visitors on the trails, you may want to choose a backcountry adventure.
  2. Avoid removing seeds or shells, damaging corals or picking flowers to not have a negative impact on nature. Enjoy watching the wildlife instead of feeding it to not intervener with their natural way of sourcing food.
  3. If you are planning on camping in a national park, make sure to check the local camping regulations and prepare your campground meals in advance. Bringing your ingredients in reusable containers (including your reusable water bottle) will help to reduce waste. In case you still produce waste, ensure that it goes in the correct bins or take it back with you if no suitable disposal is available. Read more of our tips for responsible camping and RVing.
  4. Use the park’s shuttle services for transportation if available instead of driving yourself. You will be able to enjoy more of the scenery and worry less about traffic or parking. They are also a great way to get around if you are planning a one-way hike.

Read more about the right behaviour in national parks here, stay safe and enjoy your visit!

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November 02 2015 – “Pain?” asks Jorge Molina, my hiking guide. Yes, there is a little pain, but it’s too late for cold feet. Or, more accurately, it’s too late not to get cold feet, because we’re already shin-deep in a swift icy river. Graeme Greene Read more.

Uganda: The Human Story Behind Gorilla Tourism

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11 June 2015: Uganda – In 2014, the Oscar-nominated documentary Virunga exposed the threat to gorillas in Congo, but in neighbouring Uganda the Batwa – who have shared forests with mountain gorillas for generations – face a struggle for survival. The creation of national parks has seen tourism boom, though the Batwa have been forcibly evicted from their land. Read more.

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This report examines the current and potential market for summer mountain tourism. It aims to satisfy the expectations of these markets by providing the type of experiences and activities that best meets their needs while maintaining the environmental integrity of these mountain regions. In preserving the unique resources of the mountain regions, the nature of the market must be understood in order to predict and manage impacts.

by Phillipa Thomas, Petra Triandos and Roslyn Russell

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Visitor Monitoring in Mountain Parks and Resorts: Summer Mountain Tourism, Victoria

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The need for data on the recreational use of the alpine area of Kosciuszko National Park is important for the sustainable visitor use of the highest area in Australia. Previous visitor monitoring surveys and estimations of  visitor numbers have shown significant increases in visitation between the late 1970s and the early 1990s. Over the 1999/2000 summer, a 40 day monitoring program was undertaken for the Kosciuszko alpine area by the New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service in conjunction with the Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre.

by Stuart Johnston and Andrew Growcock

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Visiting the Kosciuszko Alpine Area: Visitor Numbers, Characteristics and Activities

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The Mt Kosciuszko alpine area is a major ecotourism destination, especially for summer day-walkers to the highest peak on the Australian continent. The popularity of this natural heritage not only vindicates the historical vision for its conservation but has also created a new conservation management imperative.

by Graeme L. Worboys and Catherine M. Pickering

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Managing the Kosciuszko Alpine Area: Conservation Milestones and Future Challenges

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This is the first assessment of the value of national parks, marine parks and forests for tourism and recreation in Western Australia. A case study approach was adopted and two study regions were nominated because of their significance for tourism and recreation and their endowment of natural attractions within parks, forests and marine areas. This study estimated the direct yearly tourist expenditure in two regions known for their unique natural attractions – the Southern Forest Region and the Gascoyne Coast Region.

by Jack Carlsen and David Wood

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Cover_WAparks

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This report provides a complete summary of the scoping study report which has been undertaken by STCRC, The Impacts of Climate Change on Australian Tourism Destinations: Developing adaptation and response strategies — a scoping study. The goal of the project was to build a framework to inform and prioritise adaptation strategies which can be undertaken by destinations and tourism businesses. To do this, the climate change vulnerability of each destination was assessed, with a focus on the potential impacts on tourism infrastructure, activities and operational costs. Summary chapters highlighting key research, findings and recommendations for each of the case study regions are included in this document.

by STCRC

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The Impacts of Climate Change Summary Cover Image

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This report reviews current practices of Australian National Park agencies in relation to asset management: asset categories, strategic frameworks, information systems, valuation, age and condition, condition monitoring and maintenance schedules, budget allocation and capital works programs and budgets.

by Ralf Buckley, Natasha Witting and Michaela Guest

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Managing People in Australian Parks - 4. Asset Management

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