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October 21 2015 – Following the earthquake that struck Nepal earlier this year, many in the country’s tourism industry, supported by friends and colleagues from around the world, began to collaborate on ideas and solutions for how to get its tourism industry back on its feet as quickly as possible. Jeremy Smith Read more.

 

Estimating the Economic Impacts of Festivals and Events: A Research Guide

Categories: Case Study, Management, Monitoring & Evaluation, Oceania, Pacific, Private Sector
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This study reviews basic principles of economic impact and applies them to a series of four special events held during summer-autumn at Thredbo in Kosciuszko National Park. The four events were the Australian Mountain Bike Association Cup, National Runners Week, Shakespeare Festival and the Thredbo Jazz Festival.

by Ben Janeczko, Trevor Mules and Brent Ritchie

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Estimating the Economic Impacts of Festivals and Events: A Research Guide

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The Mt Kosciuszko alpine area is a major ecotourism destination, especially for summer day-walkers to the highest peak on the Australian continent. The popularity of this natural heritage not only vindicates the historical vision for its conservation but has also created a new conservation management imperative.

by Graeme L. Worboys and Catherine M. Pickering

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Managing the Kosciuszko Alpine Area: Conservation Milestones and Future Challenges

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This report provides a complete summary of the scoping study report which has been undertaken by STCRC, The Impacts of Climate Change on Australian Tourism Destinations: Developing adaptation and response strategies — a scoping study. The goal of the project was to build a framework to inform and prioritise adaptation strategies which can be undertaken by destinations and tourism businesses. To do this, the climate change vulnerability of each destination was assessed, with a focus on the potential impacts on tourism infrastructure, activities and operational costs. Summary chapters highlighting key research, findings and recommendations for each of the case study regions are included in this document.

by STCRC

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The Impacts of Climate Change Summary Cover Image

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Following discussions within the Tourism and Climate Change Taskforce in 2007–2008, STCRC decided to undertook a study of the potential adaptations to climate change in five key tourist destinations in Australia: Kakadu National Park, the Cairns region (including the Great Barrier Reef and Wet Tropics rainforest), the Blue Mountains, the Barossa Valley and the Victorian Alps.  The research project examines existing knowledge on anticipated biophysical changes and, through primary research (stakeholder interviews and social learning workshops), gauges the expected adaptive approaches of destination communities and the tourism sector to these changes for 2020, 2050 and 2070. It then estimates likely economic consequences. This technical report presents the research findings in full and supports the summary developed by STCRC.

by Stephen Turton, Wade Hadwen and Robyn Wilson (editors)

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