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Child Welfare and the Travel Industry – Global Good Practice Guidelines

Categories: Human Rights, People and Places
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As the demand for experiential travel and social, cultural, and community-based tourism grows, so do the risk factors for children as well as potential risks for your staff and reputation. Children deserve and need the power of the tourism industry and associated businesses to adopt approaches that not only recognize their vulnerability but also seek to mitigate risks to them. Most of the time these risks are solely linked to possible sexual exploitation and/or abuse, but there are other harm factors that the industry needs to work to address. For example, is your business considerate of how you use images of children in marketing and advertising? Do your products include activities with potential negative impacts, such as visiting schools or orphanages? Do your clients know that giving money to (or buying gifts from) a begging child is harmful?

In 2017, ChildSafe partnered with G Adventures and Planeterra Foundation to develop practical, international guidelines for the travel industry to use within their own companies and initiatives, a first of their kind. They extend beyond obviously harmful behaviors and expose the potential negative effects of common, well-intentioned efforts.

There are 15 guidelines organized under four sections to offer businesses a structured approach for implementation:

  1. Guidelines to ensure your company is able to prevent and respond to child abuse arising from tourism interactions
  2. Guidelines for your products and services to have the best impact on children
  3. Guidelines to ensure your Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) initiatives are reinforcing child welfare
  4. Guidelines for implementation

These guidelines have been developed to provide a common understanding of child welfare issues throughout the travel industry and to provide all travel businesses with guidance to prevent all forms of exploitation and abuse of children that could be related to travelers and the tourism industry. In short, they will enable you to do more good through your business.

 

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Ten countries that protect their environment and respect human rights

Chile_made the list of the ten most ethical travel destinations for 2017

Chile made the list of the ten most ethical travel destinations for 2017, in part due to its expanding solar industry in places like the Atacama Desert, pictured above. Photo credit: Danielle Pereira / Flickr

Travel is more than an opening for good will, writes Ethical Traveller. It is one of the world’s most powerful economic engines, and can drive the way countries treat their citizens, indigenous peoples, wildlife and the environment. Travel is the world’s largest industry, with a trillion-dollar annual footprint. This means that travelers have enormous power. Where we put our footprints has reverberations reaching far beyond our personal experience. By “voting with our wings” – choosing our destinations well and cultivating our roles as citizen diplomats – we can help to change the world for the better.

Every year, Ethical Traveler reviews the policies and practices of over one hundred developing nations. We then select the ten that are doing the most impressive job of promoting human rights, preserving the environment and supporting social welfare – all while creating a lively, community-based tourism industry. By visiting these countries, we can use our economic leverage to reward good works and support best practices.

 


The Winners
Ethical Traveler congratulates the countries on our 2017 list of The World’s Ten Best Ethical Destinations. The winners, in alphabetical order (not in order of merit), are:

  • Belize
  • Cabo Verde
  • Chile
  • Costa Rica
  • Dominica
  • Mongolia
  • Palau
  • Tonga
  • Uruguay
  • Vanuatu

By Ethical Traveller. Find out how the list is created – click here to read the original article.

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2016 has been a significant year in advancing fundamental principles and rights at work. Working with governments, social partners and communities, the ILO FUNDAMENTALS Branch has helped those who cannot organize and bargain collectively, those suffering from discrimination, and those who are trapped in child labour and forced labour. There is much more to be done, and we look forward to accelerating progress and coordinating action towards our common goals over the coming years.

Click here for the original article by International Labour Organization (ILO).

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October 01 2015 – This year’s World Tourism Day theme ‘1 Billion Tourists – 1 Billion Opportunities’ sounds like a slogan for an advert to entice consumers to buy a product like a laundry detergent or hamburger. The UNWTO invites us to celebrate 1 billion tourist arrivals per year and the seemingly unlimited growth of the travel and tourism industry; it is hoped that by 2030, almost 2 billion people will have embraced the tourist lifestyle. Travindy Read more.

Intensifying Efforts to Combat Sexual Exploitation of Children in the Tourism Industry

Categories: Asia, Case Study, Human Rights, People and Places, Southeast
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Development Partnership with the Private Sector Supports the Code in Thailand

Tourism plays a significant role in driving economic growth in developing countries. However, an increasing number of tourists influence the sex tourism business. Although the travel sector is not directly responsible for the sexual abuse of children in the tourist trade, the tourism industry has a key role to play in combating the sexual exploitation of minors. It is important to raise awareness of this issue, one that few venture to address.

by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH

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TheCode_Thailand

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The International Ecotourism Society, TIES, defines ecotourism as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.” The concept arose in the 1970s from the general global environmental movement, and by the 1990s was one of the fastest-growing tourism sectors. Ecotourism appeals to responsible travelers who want to minimize the negative impacts of their visit, and who take special interest in local nature and cultures. Carole Simm. Read more.

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