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Tips on Packing Light for Your Next Business Trip

Categories: Green Tips
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A simple equation: The more the luggage weighs, the heavier the plane. The more a plane weights, the more fuel it uses, the more carbon emissions your trip produces. Here are some ways to pack less, save the environment, while saving your back!

1. Skip the hazzle- dazzle: Ditch the colors

Neutral colors are compatible with almost anything and doesn’t make it seem like you’re repeating clothing. For women, black pants can be versatile for day and night, with just a change of accessories! For men, a neutral colored suit and a change of tie and shirt should be enough for up to five meeting days. Don’t underestimate mix and matching!

2. Lose weight on electronics

Tablets are always a good alternative to laptops, if you need to use a laptop during your trip, you could also check for a business center in your accommodation. Another way to bring fewer electronic items is to audit your battery lifespan and understand whether you will need your charger for your trip (don’t forget to fully charge it before leaving).

3. Don’t let your bag bug you

Purchasing the right bag is more important than you think. Regular suitcases tend to weight more than 25% of the airline weight limit. By investing in a light weight bag, you will have more space and produce fewer carbon emissions.

4. Get rid of printed items and bulky folders

Pen drives and email attachments should be sufficiently effective nowadays, printed items and bulky folders are a thing of the past.

5. Optimize your cosmetics

Toiletries are low hanging fruit here- utilize what the hotel gives you, or consider using bar soaps. Check out this complete guide to sustainable hair and skincare when traveling. Remember to keep it light and sustainable!

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Credit: Shutterstock

By Dr. Peter Tarlow from Tourism & More

TOURISM & MORE’S  “TOURISM TIDBITS”

March 2018

With the Northern Hemisphere’s winter soon to become spring, on some level tourism officials can take a sigh of relief that there were no major pandemics. This season was however in many parts of the world an extremely difficult flu season that resulted in a great deal of discomfort, days missed at work, and even in some extreme cases deaths.

Tourism is especially vulnerable to contagious illnesses. People are in close contact, often both tourism employees and travelers are subjected to filtered, rather than fresh air. Additionally we are all subject to issues of jet lag, disrupted sleep patters and irregular eating. In some of the less well paid tourism jobs employees fear losing a day’s pay if they stay home when ill, come to work sick, and then infect others.

If travel were not hard enough on a person’s body, there are still other problems that must be taken into consideration. For example, hygiene standards are not the same around the world. The traveler often has no way of knowing the level of cleanliness in a restaurant, if waiters and waitresses wash their hands enough and with soap and hot water. People staying at hotels have no way of knowing the quality of the mattress upon which they are sleeping or the condition of the air ducts that bring air conditioning into their room.

Additionally a sick chambermaid may infect a visitor’s room while cleaning it or become ill from a person who is staying in the room and has infected that room by sneezing or coughing. Examples of some of these health and wellness challenges can be seen in problems experienced within the cruise industry due to the Nordau virus, or in tourism buildings due to legionary’s disease,

Tourism promotes travel and schedules are built around the assumption of wellness. A traveler cannot change an airline reservation due to a cold or feeling sick, a person’s hotel reservation may force that person to check out rather than rest, and often it is not easy to find a place to eat at odd hours of the day. Finally, in many parts of the world, it may not easy to find an international doctor, the local health agency may not accept foreign health insurance, and language problems may make it difficult for the ill person to describe his or her problem to the local health professional. These same problems do not only apply to leisure and business travelers, but also to first responders, international aid workers, and government agents. Often these people are so involved in their labors of love that they forget that they too are fragile human beings who are also subject to illnesses. In order to help you think about caring for your visitors and at the same time caring for yourself, Tourism Tidbits presents to you the following ideas.

  • Develop a tourism health task force. Keeping visitors and tourism employees healthy is different from keeping local populations healthy. Visitors have less information and often more stress than the local population. The task force should consider everything from medical availability to problems of foreign health insurance. It should also look at local sanitation and hygiene issues, and how visitors can access pharmacies without having a local physician.
  • Work with the local media. The can be great allies or become a major problem. There is always a need to have the media aid in spreading information, but this must be done in a way that neither panics the public nor become a problem in and of itself. The example of the SARS reporting a few years ago is a perfect example of what not to do. In that case, misreporting about an illness caused a great deal of economic damage and made the problem worse rather than better.
  • Involve government agencies in your overall health plan. Many tourism related illnesses are interrelated to issues of clean air and water. Be mindful of where garbage is stored and even first world tourism locations often suffer from rodent infestations. These of course are also essential issues for the local population but the visitor is more prone to local diseases due to water and air pollution. Visitors often do not know if they can drink local water, how long water has been boiled before being served or if ice cubes have been made from purified water. It is the responsibility of the tourist industry to inform visitors of these precautions rather than assuming that a tired traveler will know to ask.
  • Have a plan in place regarding the way that you will deal with travel related mental heath problems. Travel produces stress and stress may result in additional mental illnesses that may range from personal behavior issues to psychotic behavior. Often people believe that being in a new location will solve an anxiety or stress problem. The results are usually to the contrary. This means that tourism professionals need to know whom to call when faced with a person suffering from some form of mental health challenge. Often these problems are made worse by the fact that the person has no support system in place and that the visitor may not be able to communicate in the local language.
  • Take care of yourself. The airline industry reminds us to put on our oxygen mask before helping others. Their advice is both sound and sage. The tourist professional cannot take care of others if s/he is sick. This means that tourism professionals need to take flue shots, eat correctly, assure that they have enough rest, and see a medical expert for regular check-ups. The better the tourism professional feels the better that person can handle the stress that comes with caring for others.
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Stay active and pick up litter

Categories: Green Tips
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Credit: Shutterstock

Daily life keeps us busy with all kinds of activities – staying healthy and making eco-conscious choices throughout every single day often requires self-discipline, especially in the phase of changing to an environmental friendlier lifestyle. To make life a little easier, we have two fun suggestions that will not only help you be kind to the environment, but also support your very own wellbeing while staying connected to a community of like-minded people.

1. Go ‘plogging’

No, that’s not a typo – ‘plogging’ describes a fitness craze that started in Sweden and has spread across the world over the last month. It is easy, addictive and highly effective! You go jogging and pick up litter on the way. Get your heart pumping and burn extra calories by bending  down to pick up trash! The health of our planet as well as your own body benefit from plogging. The best part is that it can be a social activity and is suitable for both urban and rural locations. Find a group of ploggers via social media or start your own and go for a jog e.g. along the beach, around your neighbourhood, on a trail in a park or forest nearby and pick up litter.  Be inspired by these 10 ploggers sharing what they find in one workout on social media.

2. Let rivers, lakes and the ocean be your playground

Whether you prefer to go under water for a snorkel or dive, or stay above water, e.g. on a paddle board or kayak – bring a litter picker and tie a refuse sack around your wrist or hip to put put away any litter you come across. Join a plastic patrol and help clean up our waters – every single piece of litter matter. Watch the example of kayak tours with the mission to help clean up Hoai river in Hoi An, Vietnam to see how easy it is. Kayak clean ups are also suitable for corporate initiatives or as team building activity.

Make sure to recycle and dispose the trash you pick up during any of the above activities properly. Only then you can ensure that you have helped to provide a cleaner planet for our current and future generation.

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A touch of green: Benefits of plants at your workspace

Categories: Green Tips
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Work overload, stress, low level of productivity, and illness – these are workplace characteristics many of us have experienced or witnessed at some point in our life. Perhaps you and your colleagues currently are facing a challenging time. Have you considered brightening up your workspace with plants to boost productivity?

The beneficial effects of greenery at the workplace have been researched numerous times in the past. In fact, it has been scientifically proven that the number of indoor plants proximal to a worker’s desk had small but statistically reliable associations with a decrease in sick leave and an increase in productivity. Plants in closed environments not only provide you with cleaner air by removing chemicals emitted from computers and furniture and adding humidity to the atmosphere, they also release phytochemicals that suppress mould spores and bacteria. Nature has a great impact on your mood – looking at it can help your brain shift into a more relaxed mode and ultimately reduce stress. Study results from Australia have outlined significant drops in reported depression, anger and hostility as well as tension and anxiety after introducing office plants.

Did you know that Aloe Vera and Bamboo Palm are among the recommended air improving indoor plants? Learn more about which indoor plants keep your environment alive here. Looking specifically for low-light plants, desk plants or low maintenance options? Check out these recommendations.

Ready to take your productivity to the next level? Make use of the benefits of mother nature, get a plant and bring a touch of green to your desk and workspace.

Be sure to also check out our tips on greening your way to work and staying healthy at work.

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This technical report presents a robust understanding of the major industry scoping study Health Tourism in Australia: Supply, Demand and Opportunities, presenting the research findings in full and supporting the summary developed by STCRC. It provides information and outcomes relevant for future development of the wellness and medical tourism industries in Australia.

by Cornelia Voigt, Jennifer Laing, Meredith Wray, Graham Brown, Gary Howat, Betty Weiler and Richard Trembath

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Health Tourism in Australia: Supply, Demand and Opportunities

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Public Liability in the Australian Tourism Industry: Risk Exposure Profile and Legal Responsibilities

Categories: Case Study, Management, Monitoring & Evaluation, Oceania, People and Places, Risk Management
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The premise of the project is that safety will be improved where risk exposure profiles are available for tourism industry sectors in conjunction with readily available knowledge of industry best practice and legal requirements. Hence, the purpose of the project was to identify relevant risk exposure related data and legal frameworks applicable to health and safety for the tourism industry in the states of Queensland and Victoria.

by Nick Parfitt, Christopher Arup, Damian Morgan and Jeff Wilks

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Public Liability in the Australian Tourism Industry: Risk Exposure Profile and Legal Responsibilities

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This phrasebook has been put together by a group of environmental, research and progressive organisations with an interest in sharing research-based messages on climate change with activists around Australia.

by www.climateinstitute.org.au

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Climate Messaging Guide: Cutting Through the Climate Clutter

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This study investigated the importance of aquatic ecosystems to tourism and recreation and assessed the potential and current impacts of this resource use on the sustainability of aquatic ecosystems in Australia. Through literature searches and the development of surveys we aimed to integrate current ‘on-the-ground’ activities with what is known of the impacts of tourism and recreation on aquatic ecosystems worldwide. We propose a suite of research and development priorities and opportunities arising from this that will enhance our understanding of ecosystem responses to tourism and recreation and facilitate the sustainable management of Australia’s in demand aquatic resources.

by Wade L. Hadwen, Angela H. Arthington, Paul I. Boon, Muriel Lepesteur and Arthur McComb

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Rivers, Streams, Lakes and Estuaries: Hot Spots for cool Recreation and Tourism in Australia

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Human Waste Contamination at Huts and Campsites in the Back Country of Tasmania

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The introduction of a minimal impact bushwalking (MIB) education campaign has alerted walkers to preferred behavioural practices in natural environments. However, despite the introduction of this campaign in Tasmania in 1987, there are still issues relating to visitor impact in back-country environments. The impact of visitors on the natural environment is often measured in terms of vegetation loss or track erosion. Impacts dealing with water quality issues have also been researched to a lesser degree. However, despite the visual impact of  inadequately buried human faeces at campsites, there has been very little work done on the extent of this problem, and on associated health risks.

by Kerry Bridle, Jamie Kirkpatrick and Julie von Platen

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Bridle_Waste-CampsitesTAS

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