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Captive Elephant Welfare Initiative

Elephants in captivity are an ethical concern in the tourism industry. The rapid growth in tourism’s demand for interaction with elephants across Asia coupled with inadequate government regulations has resulted of poor treatment of these animals in many of the elephant facilities. Other facilities however are working in compliance with the best achievable practices in close partnership with elephant experts and universities. Up to date no international accepted standard and related assessment system was existing. The so-called Elephant Camp Animal Welfare Standard and Assessment initiative aims to recognise the better camps and to motivate those not yet complying towards better animal welfare.

Elephants in Asia

With over 3000 years of captive elephant history and given that there are over ten thousand captive elephants in Asia it is important to establish scientific facts, respect local culture and lay down solid foundations that ensure the welfare of captive elephants as well as their traditional mahouts.

Despite calls for action from various animal rights groups, their approach is often not based on scientific facts, does not engage mahouts and elephant (family) business, does not present achievable solutions nor looks at long term sustainability and the survival of the species as such.

We believe responsible tourism encouraging elephant experiences of the highest standard is the most immediate, viable solution. We believe by engaging stakeholders to seek holistic improvements and setting standards across the industry, more can be done to protect elephants than by staging boycotts or signing pledges. Hard work and hard choices based on scientific facts, balancing the interest of individual Elephants, the mahouts, and the conservation of the Asian Elephant, are required by all involved.

Leading Asian tour operators with support of Travelife for Tour Operators, the Asian Captive Elephant Working Group (ACEWG) and PATA have therefore initiated a process to establish a widely supported set of standards and criteria as a guideline and reference for elephant camps. The Elephant Camp Animal Welfare Initiative will provide tour operators as well as their clients the ability to make an informed, ethical choice

Information meeting for Thai Elephant camp owners and managers (August 2017)

The standard

The standard is based upon international animal welfare and sustainability principles including the Asian Captive Elephant Working Group (ACEWG) principles for captive elephants. The standards have also been subject to consultation from individual elephant experts from various disciplines (e.g. elephant veterinarians, mahouts, behavioural experts, biologist, animal learning experts, researchers). Based on a careful process a final draft of the standard was reached in 2017. The standard includes more than 160 criteria divided over 7 themes and 24 subthemes and provides detailed guidelines for the camps as well as the external assessor covering not only the elephants but also the staff, mahouts, sustainable business practices and the relation with the local communities. Elephant camps that comply with the highest of standards treat their elephants in the best possible manner and are committed towards a process of permanent improvement. The scientific based guidelines cover, for example cruelty free learning science based training techniques, closely monitored and regulated working hours, rest periods throughout the day – ideally in a forested area to socialize, bathe and relax and more. Responsible camps have veterinarians on staff, and/or provide regular health checks. Elephants are not tied up with chains of lengths less than 2 metres for prolonged periods of time. Good camps work with local communities providing jobs, marketing local handicrafts and purchasing local supplies to ensure everyone benefits. Camps promoting best practices also actively support and engage in research and conservation projects protecting animals in the wild.

Any interactions between elephants and tourists are based on scientific standards and do not compromise the welfare of the elephants or endanger humans. Most importantly, all good camps register their elephants with the relevant government department, complete with DNA testing to ensure no wild stocks are being captured and added to the captive population. The assessment is designed to ensure standards set by leading experts are being met and improved.

Currently more than 30 elephant facilities from Thailand, Myanmar, Laos, Malaysia and Indonesia have enrolled in the program and are under assessment. They are committed to improvements to comply with the standard.

Supporting tour operators
The initiative is supported by a growing number of Asian tour operators including:.

When you travel with the tour operators supporting this initiative you can be assured that any elephant experience suggested is being held to the highest of international standards and practices. In this way we believe we are effectively contributing to the protection and preservation of elephants in Asia.

The destination management companies (DMCs) and tour operators involved in this initiative will also no longer work with any elephant camp that refuses to be audited or assessed as complete transparency is needed in all aspects of the operations to gauge and ensure responsible practices are indeed in place. Thus financial gains are directed to those working on improving and ensuring the long term welfare of their captive elephants and staff and not to those operating unethically or purely for profit or under false (animal welfare) pretences.

So yes, elephants in captivity is an ethical concern under current circumstances but by working together and using tourism as a powerful tool in the right way, we can ensure the long-term quality if life of thousands of captive elephants throughout Asia and provide clients with an inspiring experience, whilst improving the lives of all involved and preserving local culture and heritage.

Animal welfare auditor and advisor training (Chiang Mai, August 2017)

For more information please contact:

PATA Sustainability: ssr@PATA.org
Travelife for Tour Operators: info@travelife.info
Asian Captive Elephant Working Group: http://acewg.org

Resources

http://sustain.pata.org/interview-dr-andrew-mclean-human-elephant-learning-program/

Statement

http://sustain.pata.org/captive-elephant-welfare-initiative/

http://acewg.org/news/

www.travelife.info/index_new.php?menu=projects&lang=en

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The International Conference on Community Development through Tourism, held in Phnom Penh, Cambodia from 16-17 September 2014, organized by the Royal Government of Cambodia, in collaboration with the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) and the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC).

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In Sri Lanka, home composting is promoted in many municipalities as a simple and low-cost solution to emerging waste disposal problems in the present day society. Produced by Practical Action South Asia, this technical brief is intended to disseminate the technology of concrete composting bin fabrication.

by www.practicalaction.org
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Singapore, Macau and Taiwan take the lead

Sustainability for the business events industry in Asia is taking time to take hold. A lot of events people have good intentions and while we are seeing signs of acceptance of the importance of sustainability, there’s a need for less talk and more action. Ken Hickson. Read more.

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In 1998, the need to develop guidelines for tourism where heritage places are involved was identified. This followed recognition that there needed to be a stronger bridge between tourism industry codes of practice and heritage conservation principles.

by Australian Heritage Commission and Sustainable Tourism CRC

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This project seeks to address the lack of knowledge and develop guidelines for assessing the viability of new and existing user-pays systems for protected areas in Australia.

by Michael Hughes, Jack Carlsen, Gary Crilley, Samantha King, Diane Lee and Gail Kennedy

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Good Practice User-Pays Systems for Protected Areas

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The study aimed to develop a digital interactive to enrich visitor experiences at heritage tourism sites. It also developed a suite of guidelines to allow heritage tourism operators (and heritage managers) to operate a similar interactive module at heritage sites throughout Australia.

by Celmara Pocock, Marion Stell, Lucy Frost, Julia Crozier and Simon Ancher

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Guidelines for Design and Implementation of Monitoring Programs to Assess Visitor Impacts in and Around Aquatic Ecosystems within Protected Areas

Categories: Land, Monitoring & Evaluation, Report, Survey, Visitors, Water
Comments Off on Guidelines for Design and Implementation of Monitoring Programs to Assess Visitor Impacts in and Around Aquatic Ecosystems within Protected Areas

This report documents the design, implementation, analysis and interpretation of field trials of indicators that were selected to assess visitor impacts in and around focal swimming holes.

by Wade L. Hadwen, Angela H. Arthington and Paul I. Boon

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This report provides an evaluation of existing organised opportunities for viewing free-ranging kangaroos in Australia and provides recommendations for best practice. “Kangaroo” is used as shorthand for any of the 60 or so species of the superfamily Macropodoidea.

by Karen Higginbottom, Ronda Green, Neil Leiper, Gianna Moscardo, Andrew Tribe and Ralf Buckley

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Evaluation of Organised Tourism Involving Wild Kangaroos

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This  best practice manual concentrates specifically on the procedures of dolphin swim-tour operations. It is a knowledge product developed from the research findings of the technical report Best Practice and Interpretation Tourist/Wildlife Encounters: A Wild Dolphin Swim Tour Example.

by Fleur ONeill, Sam Barnard and Diane Lee

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Best Practice Guidelines for Dolphin Swim Tour Operations Industry Manual : A Dolphin Discovery Center Example

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