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Prosper was established to develop context specific yet holistic models for assessing the value of tourism in regional destinations. The research has produced a range of immediately useful tools, including: a template for collecting and analysing indicators of the economic, social, and environmental value of tourism, a methodology for conducting Prosper research in a variety of regional settings, a research book documenting lessons learned from the case studies, a template for delivering relevant Prosper indicators relating to employment, business activity, and development patterns through Decipher.

by Dean Carson, Jim Macbeth and Damien Jacobsen

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Carson_Prosper

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Underlying this pilot study is the recognition that the economic, social and environmental outcomes of regional tourism development are largely determined by important conditions, such as interrelationships and resources, within any region. This report presents the findings of a capacity for innovative regional tourism  development pilot case study conducted in the northern New South Wales community of Woodburn.

by Damien Jacobsen, Dean Carson, Jim Macbeth and Simon Rose

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Jacobsen_Woodburn

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This Resource Kit is designed to provide information and tools to assist  those working in the tourism industry, or seeking to develop tourism, to  successfully promote the economic, socio-cultural and environmental benefits  of tourism. Available on CD-ROM only.

by Ingrid Rosemann, Gary Prosser, Stephanie Hunt, Kate Benecke

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CRTR-5

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In Western Australia, licensing is utilised by State Government agencies to regulate the behaviour of the nature tourism industry from a number of perspectives. This study examined whether, in addition to its intended benefits, the State’s current licensing framework is creating impediments or costs for commercial nature tourism operators. Interviews with licensing agency representatives and a review of the literature pointed to licensing compliance costs as the main complaint from nature tour operators. Sources of dissatisfaction included the need for multiple licenses from multiple agencies, license security, added paperwork, and non-transferability of some types of licenses.

by Sabrina Genter, Jo Ann Beckwith and David Annandale

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This document describes how the Ministry of Natural Resources works to contribute to the Ontario Government’s commitment to reduce the rate of global warming and the impacts associated with climate change. The framework contains strategies and sub-strategies organized according to the need to understand climate change, mitigate the impacts of rapid climate change, and help Ontarians adapt to climate change.

by Climate Change Research Report CCRR-08

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STO-CLIMATE-CHANGE-NATURE-BASED-TOURISM-OUTDOOR-RECREATION-AND-FORESTRY-IN-ONTARIO-1

 

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North Korea is a country of nearly 25 million people. According to research from leading North Korea experts, four- to five million of these are middle class North Koreans, with disposable income, who like to go on dinner dates at local restaurants, or watch movies, or save up for a new home appliance. These aren’t just a cadre of 10,000 or so elites. These are normal North Koreans seeking to live enjoyable lives with their friends and families. James Carli. Read more.

 


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