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The Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre (Credit: Green Hotelier)

The meetings, incentives, conferences and exhibitions (MICE) sector has a bigger role to play in measuring and promoting sustainable travel according to Stewart Moore of EarthCheck.

The MICE sector represents big business, delivering major economic benefits that are a key contributor to the growth in tourism and leisure development worldwide. And the benefits from MICE extend far beyond the actual hosting of the event, with trade opportunities being generated in both host and visitor countries: tourism represents 5% of global GDP and contributes to more than 8% of total employment.

“The sheer size and reach of the tourism and travel sector now gives it a substantial voice, but it is important to recognise that you can’t manage what you can’t measure,” EarthCheck CEO and founder, Stewart Moore said.

Mr Moore said he is surprised that MICE operators and tourism groups worldwide, who are doing excellent work in sustainability, seem to be still hesitant to share their stories.

 

Read the full article what the MICE industry can do more to promote sustainable travel here.

By  for The Green Hotelier.

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This report examines and reviews visitor impact modelling applications in Australia. A variety of visitor impact models  and processes have been used in Australia and internationally but the extent of their use and perceived effectiveness are  not well understood. This project used a Delphi technique and reference group to collect expert opinion from two  different panels: an expert academic panel; and an industry reference group consisting of individuals from state and  commonwealth agencies.

by Greg Brown, Barbara Koth, Glenn Kreag and Delene Weber

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Managing Australia’s Protected Areas: A Review of Visitor Management Models, Frameworks and Processes

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In Western Australia, licensing is utilised by State Government agencies to regulate the behaviour of the nature tourism industry from a number of perspectives. This study examined whether, in addition to its intended benefits, the State’s current licensing framework is creating impediments or costs for commercial nature tourism operators. Interviews with licensing agency representatives and a review of the literature pointed to licensing compliance costs as the main complaint from nature tour operators. Sources of dissatisfaction included the need for multiple licenses from multiple agencies, license security, added paperwork, and non-transferability of some types of licenses.

by Sabrina Genter, Jo Ann Beckwith and David Annandale

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This study presents a framework for the development of social indicators to measure the impact of tourism on communities. It is a research project which emanated from the Green Globe 21 Standard that incorporates  indicators for the environmental impact of tourism and seeks to develop other indicators. The report provides the theoretical background to the concept of sustainable tourism and examines the preliminary findings of the key themes from some exploratory research.

by Liz Fredline, Margaret Deery and Leo Jago

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Fredline_Socialimpacts

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This report provides a complete summary of the scoping study report which has been undertaken by STCRC, The Impacts of Climate Change on Australian Tourism Destinations: Developing adaptation and response strategies — a scoping study. The goal of the project was to build a framework to inform and prioritise adaptation strategies which can be undertaken by destinations and tourism businesses. To do this, the climate change vulnerability of each destination was assessed, with a focus on the potential impacts on tourism infrastructure, activities and operational costs. Summary chapters highlighting key research, findings and recommendations for each of the case study regions are included in this document.

by STCRC

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The Impacts of Climate Change Summary Cover Image

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The National Climate Change Adaptation Framework identified tourism as one key sector vulnerable to the impacts of climate change in Australia. This paper evaluates how nine government tourism agencies are responding to the issue of climate change in Australia.     It critically evaluates how government tourism agencies are addressing climate change issues, by promoting carbon reduction initiatives and carbon offsetting schemes for tourism operators.

by Heather Zeppel & Narelle Beaumont, University of Southern Queensland Australian Centre for Sustainable Business & Development

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This Update paper re-examines likely trends in global emissions in the absence of effective mitigation and in the absence of major feedbacks from climate change to economic growth. It analyses changes in the variables affecting emissions growth (namely population, economic output, energy demand, and the economic and technological factors affecting the choice among sources of energy) in major countries and regions. It also explores the implications of the Great Crash of 2008, which lowered the long-term growth trajectory of developed countries, but did not slow the immense growth momentum of the largest developing countries, nor end the higher growth of the early twenty first century in other developing countries.

by Professor Ross Garnaut

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GARNAUT-CLIMATE-CHANGE-UPDATE-PAPER-3-Global-emissions-trends-1

 

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The Garnaut Climate Change Review—led by Professor Ross Garnaut—was first commissioned by Australia’s Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments in 2007, to conduct an independent study of the impacts of climate change on the Australian economy.  This paper focuses on five climate change action issues: the choice of discount rate (the valuation of the welfare of people living now relative to people living in future); the presence of uncertainty; the interaction between climate change, its mitigation and the growth of incomes and economic welfare in developing countries; what is an appropriate and proportionate Australian contribution to various levels of international mitigation effort; and the optimal balance between efforts on climate change mitigation and on climate change adaptation.

by Professor Ross Garnaut

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GARNAUT-CLIMATE-CHANGE-UPDATE-1-Weighing-the-costs-and-benefits-of-climate-change-action-1

 

 

 

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Wildlife tourism is big business worldwide, and is a valuable tool for nature conservation. This is a comprehensive volume on the subject, written by experts in the field and drawing on a wide range of disciplines. It covers the full scope of wildlife tourism, including zoos, wildlife watching, hunting and fishing. It provides an up-to-date review of wildlife tourism issues, and practical directions for enhancing its Triple Bottom Line sustainability. This book is essential reading for all tourism professionals, wildlife managers, recreation managers, researchers, and general readers with an interest in the role of wildlife in tourism. For a review of this title by WildWatch, go to this site – http://www.wildwatch.com/magazine/reviews.asp

by Karen Higginbottom

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Wildlife Tourism: Impacts, Management and Planning

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The principal aim of this exploratory study is to develop and test the initial stages of a framework to assess the sustainability of marine wildlife tourism operations in Western Australia. In particular, this study uses the available research as a guide to understanding ecological, environmental, operational and social impacts of marine wildlife tourism on both marine wildlife and humans and subsequently develops a wildlife-auditing framework.

by Kate Rodger, Amanda Smith, Claire Davis, David Newsome and Philip Patterson

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