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SOURCE: FRONTIER MYANMAR

Green Hill Valley Elephant care camp is making Elephant care a priority! After 3 years of exploring potential sites, owner Tin Win Maw has taken the plunge as Myanmar’s first privately owned care camp. Read the full article here.

Published on Frontier Myanmar.

Written by Thomas Kean.

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Mahouts rest as their elephants eat fruit in Chiang Mai. Credit: The Antlantic

While Western activists focus on the animals, their handlers are often treated as expendable.

Mahouts today are caught in a catch-22. Tourists have come to believe that traditional tools like chains and bullhooks are inherently unethical, but still want to be able to have up-close-and-personal interactions with elephants. “I use a bullhook because some elephants we cannot control with our hands,” one mahout explained. “Humans are small. Elephants spook easily and are dangerous. If elephants get scared, they kill people.”

“By working with mahouts to improve their treatment of elephants while also acknowledging the difficult lives mahouts often live themselves, we can positively impact the captive elephant situation as a whole. Criticizing a culture that is not your own does not help change it.”

There are many more aspects to consider that outsiders tend to forget when thinking about elephant welfare. Read the full article to see things from a different perspective considering culture, habitat, and elephant welfare.

By Hilary Cadigan for The Atlantic.

 

 

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The Human Cost of Elephant Tourism

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Mahouts rest as their elephants eat fruit in Chiang Mai

While Western activists focus on the animals, their handlers are often treated as expendable.

It should have been a day like any other in Mae Wang, Thailand. But at one elephant camp in this small rural district just outside the tourism hub of Chiang Mai, the elephant handlers, or mahouts, were on edge. Somjai, a five-ton bull decked out with a pair of meter-long ivory tusks, was in musth, a hormonal phase characterized by huge increases in testosterone and aggression. By Hilary Cadigan. Read more.

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September 17 2015 – A new report by World Animal Protection highlights the rise in southern Africa of elephant rides and shows, tourist attractions that are already well established in parts of Asia. Kate Nustedt, Director of Wildlife at World Animal Protection, says: “You’re taking the wild out of Africa by breaking the spirit of their elephants so they can be ridden and perform for tourists.” By Travindy. Read more.

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