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Children at an orphanage outside the capital, Phnom Penh. Photograph: AAP

Volunteers and visitors urged to stay away, saying their growing presence damages children and allows exploitation.

Child protection and NGO workers are pleading with tourists and volunteers to stay away from orphanages in Cambodia, claiming so-called “orphanage tourism” damages the children and enables exploitation. Read more.

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European tourism professionals, accessibility experts and policymakers talk about the business case for accessible tourism and how destinations and enterprises can win more business by responding to market changes. The interviews were recorded at the European Conference, “Mind the Accessibility Gap. Re-Thinking Accessible Tourism in Europe” on 6th June 2014. Read more.

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This study sought to gain insight to international students studying on the Gold Coast. In particular, data were obtained on student needs and perceptions on a range of attributes associated with a study destination. Similarly, the study investigated students’ participation in tourism activities while at the destination. Finally, information on what students spend their money on was also sought. A questionnaire was developed based on relevant  literature and preliminary focus groups. The final questionnaire was distributed to commencing international students studying at Griffith University in 2003.

by Beverley Sparks, Liz Fredline and Chelsea Northrope

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Study Tourism on the Gold Coast 2003

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The tourism industry has a collective responsibility to ensure that the impact it has on the environment is minimised and that sustainable industry practices are encouraged.    Destination Melbourne has a role in providing leadership to the tourism industry, and educating visitors on how they can reduce their environmental and social impact.

by EarthCheck

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The aim of this study was to evaluate a range of environmental and sustainable tourism awards available to the Australian tourism industry from the perspective of 1999 and 2000 award applicants.

by Jasmine Foxlee

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Environmental Tourism Awards - Encouraging Best Practice Environmental Management?

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This report documents a multi-perspective investigation into the training needs of the hospitality and tourism industry in Australia.

by Paul A Whitelaw, Paul Barron, Jeremy Buultjens, Grant Cairncross and Michael Davidson

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Training Needs of the Hospitality Industry

 

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International Education Visitation – Tourism Opportunities

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This report presents the first comprehensive tourism study of international students and their visiting friends and relatives. It involved focus groups and a large national survey of international students studying at higher education, vocational education and training and English language institutions in Australia. The findings provide important insights for Australia’s tourism leaders seeking to take full advantage of this market and develop innovative approaches to maximise its potential.

by Michael Davidson, Hugh Wilkins, Brian King, Perry Hobson, Stephen Craig-Smith and Sarah Gardiner

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This Case Study illustrates how the owners of Rose Gums Wilderness Retreat actively engage their guests in their passion for energy efficiency through education, and how they have implemented various initiatives resulting in significant energy cost savings.

by ATEC, EC3 Global

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Human Waste Contamination at Huts and Campsites in the Back Country of Tasmania

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The introduction of a minimal impact bushwalking (MIB) education campaign has alerted walkers to preferred behavioural practices in natural environments. However, despite the introduction of this campaign in Tasmania in 1987, there are still issues relating to visitor impact in back-country environments. The impact of visitors on the natural environment is often measured in terms of vegetation loss or track erosion. Impacts dealing with water quality issues have also been researched to a lesser degree. However, despite the visual impact of  inadequately buried human faeces at campsites, there has been very little work done on the extent of this problem, and on associated health risks.

by Kerry Bridle, Jamie Kirkpatrick and Julie von Platen

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As a socially responsible person, you probably want to make the world a little better. Even when you travel, you might try to visit undeveloped areas where your tourism dollars can help a local economy thrive. You might even contribute your time to the community as a volunteer. Ecotourism’s idealistic goal is to improve the world through responsible travel; while its effects will probably never match its ideals, travelers can offer very real benefits to local communities. Jessica Blue. Read more.

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