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All posts tagged ecotourism

Have the best travel experience with the most positive impact with our tips for sustainable travel

Ecotourism, responsible travel, sustainable tourism, going green – call it what you will, these days we’re all thinking a little more carefully about how and where we travel. The headline news has largely revolved around the environmental impact of flying, but if you’re serious about greening up your travel, you need to look beyond carbon offsetting. Read more.

 

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AS a Peace Corps volunteer in the 1960’s, Lynn Franco, now a 62-year-old psychoanalyst who lives in Berkeley, Calif., had always been interested in the underdeveloped regions she had traveled through. She said that longtime interest was what led her to join a March trip to Borneo with Seacology, a Berkeley-based nonprofit organization that seeks to preserve island environments and cultures by providing services in exchange for local conservation efforts. Bonnie Tsui. Read more.

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As a socially responsible person, you probably want to make the world a little better. Even when you travel, you might try to visit undeveloped areas where your tourism dollars can help a local economy thrive. You might even contribute your time to the community as a volunteer. Ecotourism’s idealistic goal is to improve the world through responsible travel; while its effects will probably never match its ideals, travelers can offer very real benefits to local communities. Jessica Blue. Read more.

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The International Ecotourism Society, TIES, defines ecotourism as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.” The concept arose in the 1970s from the general global environmental movement, and by the 1990s was one of the fastest-growing tourism sectors. Ecotourism appeals to responsible travelers who want to minimize the negative impacts of their visit, and who take special interest in local nature and cultures. Carole Simm. Read more.

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As I read through the extensive messaging from the travel press at this time of year, one thing stands out in my mind: that responsible travel, ecotourism, and agritourism are increasing in popularity every day. There is a convergence of ecotravel and luxe in places which were once solely back-packers’ havens. Years ago, who would have expected a luxury eco-inn in Newfoundland? But that is precisely what the Fogo Island Inn, designed by Ilse Crawford, has accomplished with flair with its artistic collaborations and a pervading sense of natural drama. Other good examples are the Pikaia Lodge, which is located on a large tortoise reserve in the Galapagos Islands, and Bale Mountain lodge in Central Ethiopia, which has an in-house naturalist to help guests understand the five distinct habitats which make up the park, home to rare animals like the black-maned lions. By Pamela Lanier. Read more

Fogo Island Inn, Newfoundland. Source: ‘E Turbo News’
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