PATA | Contact

All posts tagged Economic

Credit: United Nations

You’ve heard the letters S, D, and G being used a lot lately, but what do they mean? In this week’s PATA Sustain’s green tips, we are passing along our top tips that can help you do your part to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

   1. Knowledge is power

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development aims to shift the world onto a sustainable and resilient path. The United Nations have set a supremely ambitious and transformational vision to realize the human rights of all and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environmental. Therefore, the first step for us to be involved is to read and understand as much we as can. We understand that most people do not have the patience to read reports that are over 40 pages long. So here is an article by The Guardian on Sustainable development goals: all you need to know. If that is still too much for you, watch a short clip about the SDGs here.

Don’t stop there though, follow the UN Sustainable Development Goals platform on Facebook here. PATA also has a free publication available for download: The Olive Tree, which explores how the SDGs and travel and tourism are interlinked. Educate yourself on the problems that happen all over the world and learn from the best practices!

   2. Support your government and companies in your country

The UN provides substantive support and capacity building for the SDGs and their related thematic issues, including water, energy, climate, oceans, urbanization, transport, science and technology, and many more. It won’t take you long to realise that these issues may already be impacting your neighborhood. In order to make the 2030 agenda a reality, we need the commitment from all stakeholders, especially the ones that are closest to us.

This brings us back to tip #1: Knowledge. Start by finding out if your government has integrated the SDGs into the country development plan. See this full list of countries that are involved in the UN’s Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs). TheVNRs aim to facilitate the sharing of experiences between nations, including success, challenges and lessons learned. If your country is listed, chances are your government or local organisations already have events planned in efforts to support the SDGs. For example, Green Fins Thailand, an initiative by United Nations and Reef-World Foundation, contributes to the Sustainable Development Goals 14 (Life Below Water) and 12 (Sustainable Consumption and Production) by carrying out regular beach and coastal clean-ups. This is also a great opportunity for local communities to be involved.

 

3. The time is now

If you don’t already work for an organisation that fully supports the SDGs, you can still do your part by volunteering! Join the Scholars of Sustenance Foundation team to go on food runs to contribute to Goal 2 (Zero Hunger). If you simply cannot find the time to do, you may be surprised at just how easy it is for you to make a change. Contribute to Goal 13 (Climate Action) by reducing food waste to landfill.

If gender equality is of big importance to you, contribute to Goal 2 (Gender Equality) by supporting the rights of domestic workers in your home and community. Did you know that tens and millions of women and girls are employed in a private household? Despite their important roles, they are among the most exploited and abused workers in the world. Visit “My Fair Home” to take a pledge!

Did you know?

Every year, the UN SDG Action Award recognises individuals, civil society organizations, subnational governments, foundations, networks, private sector leaders who are advancing the global movement for the Sustainable Development Goals in the most transformative, impactful and innovative way. The winners will be announced at a special SDG Action Awards ceremony, at the Global Festival of Action on 2 May.

Keep a look out for award nominees by following their facebook page.

In a nutshell, the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are the blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all. We must continue to address the global challenges that the world is currently facing. We need to wake up and realise that human behaviour is the main reason for our increasingly volatile planet. Together, we can make a change.

Read more of #PATASustain green tips here.

Share

2015-07-11-1436582396-8160478-01UNWTO-thumb

Image Source: The Huffington Post

The HLPF (High Level Political Forum) on sustainable development is the main United Nations platform on sustainable development. It provides political leadership, guidance and recommendations. It follows up and reviews the implementation of sustainable development commitments. It addresses new and emerging challenges; promotes the science-policy interface and enhances the integration of economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable development. By Dr. Dave Randle. Read more.

Share
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

The assessment tool (phase 2) provides readers with tools, exercises and interrogating questions to better understand tourism management issues in their local destination. this is achieved through the presentation of activities and questions and through the inclusion of vignettes and stories of practice that may inspire alternative approaches to tourism management.

by Dianne Dredge, Jim Macbeth, Dean Carson, Narelle Beaumont, Jeremy Northcote, and Fiona Richards
Dredge_LTM-Phase-2
Share

The main aims of this project were to quantify the value that visitors to certain Tasmanian national parks placed on those sites, and the responsiveness of park visitation rates to changes in park entry fees.

by John Madden, Nic Groenwold, Prem Thapa

Download

Estimating the Value of Tasmanian National Parks to Park Visitors

×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7
Share

Economic Contribution on Kakadu National Park to Tourism in the Northern Territory

Categories: Management, Monitoring & Evaluation, Oceania, Pacific, Planet, Report, Survey, Visitors
Comments Off on Economic Contribution on Kakadu National Park to Tourism in the Northern Territory

This report undertakes an analysis of the economic contribution of Kakadu National Park derived solely from tourism expenditures in the Northern Territory (NT). The project utilises the methodology of Carlsen and Wood (2004) to estimate the value of Kakadu as a tourism driver to the sub-region, the broader Top End region and for the NT overall. Visitor estimates for this project were derived using the NT Travel Monitor (NTTM) surveys; however, because the NTTM does not allow reliable estimates of visitor expenditure within a sub-region, a customised survey of visitors to Kakadu National Park was used to elicit this expenditure information.

by Pascal Tremblay

Download

Economic Contribution on Kakadu National Park to Tourism in the Northern Territory

×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7
Share

The beach is generally recognised as the most important recreation amenity in the region for Gold Coast residents, as well as tourists. However, there is very little data to support the role that this amenity plays in the life of Gold Coast residents. This survey set out to collect data from Gold Coast residents regarding their beach use and the values they associate with the beach, and to develop estimates of the economic value of the beach to residents.

by Mike Raybould and Neil Lazarow

Download

Economic and Social Values of Beach Recreation on the Gold Coast

×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7
Share
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

The aim of the guide is to investigate the issues that local governments face in tourism management and the practices and approaches that have been adopted to address these issues. An investigation and appreciation of these issues is necessarily the first stage in moving towards more sustainable local tourism management.

by Dianne Dredge, Jim Macbeth, Dean Carson, Narelle Beaumont, Jeremy Northcote, and Fiona Richards

Download

Dredge_LTM-Phase-1

Share

This report provides an estimate of direct tourist spending and the contribution of that spending to Queensland’s gross state product that can be attributed to tourists’ access to national parks (NPs). The first phase of The Valuing Tourism Spend in Queensland National Parks Study was designed to provide an assessment of tourist spending associated with national parks at the regional level. Following consultation with key stakeholders of the study, a research team from The University of Queensland collected primary visitor survey data in four regions of the State of Queensland with a view to determining an estimate of the visitor spend attributable to the NPs in these regions. These regions were selected as examples of the four different types of protected area region (urban, iconic, remote and outback) to be found in Queensland. The data collected in the survey were then used to infer a value for national park-generated visitor spending for all national park regions in Queensland. The results of this study indicate that a best estimate of visitor spending associated with national parks is approximately $4.43 billion per annum with $749 million per annum in national park-generated spending.

by Roy Ballantyne, Richard Brown, Shane Pegg and Noel Scott

Download

Valuing Tourism Spend Arising from Visitation to Queensland National Parks

×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7
Share