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All posts tagged Diving

by Susan Kloulechad, Branding and Communications Representative II, Palau Visitors Authority

Disclaimer: The views, opinions and positions expressed by the author(s) and those providing comments on these blogs are theirs alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views, opinions or positions of the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) or any employee thereof. We make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, timeliness, suitability or validity of any information presented by individual authors and/or commenters on our blogs and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, or delays in this information or any losses, injuries or damages arising from its display or use.

Pristine Paradise. Stop there and imagine what it really means, and how beautiful it might look. Then pamper your eyes on speckles of emerald green mushrooms floating on a seemingly infinite cobalt sea. Then say “Palau” out loud, and see just how many people know that this island country exists. Better yet, say “Pristine Paradise. Palau”, and wonder what makes it so special. I’ll tell you the secret – it’s the people and their culture.

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26 October 2015 – A marine reserve the size of California has just been declared around the tiny Micronesian islands of Palau.

If you’re a diver, you’re smiling right now.

In this massive reserve, the largest in the Pacific, there will be no fishing or mining, but plenty of world-class diving where fish, sharks, turtles and rays will be protected. Cayla Dengate Read more.

This case study looks at how sailing adventure company Maxi Action’s Crisis Management Plan coped with Tropical Cyclone Ului, a Category 3 storm system with winds gusts of up to 200 kilometres, crossed the north Queensland coast at 1:00am, Sunday 21 March 2010. The impact caused widespread but moderate damage across the region and cut power for several days to an estimated 60,000 homes and businesses between Airlie Beach and Townsville.

by Tourism Queensland

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Crisis Management Case Study: Maxi Action

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This self-assessment checklist has been developed to help you assess where your company stands in integrating responsible environmental practices. The initial 13 questions are relevant to all forms of marine recreation, while three additional sections offer supplemental questions for providers in specific sectors: interactive marine wildlife trips, recreational fishing, and snorkeling, diving and scuba.    Each question addresses a key issue and proposes a good practice. In addition to providing a useful tool to marine recreation providers, this checklist is being used by major tourism companies, including tour operators, cruise lines and hotels, to identify and select responsible service providers.

by CORAL

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CORAL-marine-checklist

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Originally founded in 1994 to galvanize the dive community for conservation, CORAL has grown from a small, grassroots alliance into the only international nonprofit organization that works exclusively to unite communities to protect our planet’s coral reefs.     In this easy-to-follow guide, CORAL provides valuable do’s and don’ts for marine operators and their guests when snorkelling.

by CORAL

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Good Environmental Practices: Snorkeling

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Ecotourism is helping promote shark conservation around the world—while also boosting local economies. Natasha Geiling. Read more.

A photo of a whale shark, taken by a visitor during a Ceviche Tour swim in Isla Mujeres. (Courtesy of Ceviche Tours/John Vater)

A photo of a whale shark, taken by a visitor during a Ceviche Tour swim in Isla Mujeres. (Courtesy of Ceviche Tours/John Vater)

 

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Underwater cleanups are a great way to help protect the marine environment. However, there are some special considerations when cleaning up under water, especially in fragile coral reef environments.  To make this easier for reef operators, the Coral Reef Alliance (CORAL) has put together these simple guidelines.

by CORAL

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Good Environmental Practices: Underwater Clean-up

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With over 400 species of sharks inhabiting almost every aquatic ecosystem, divers and wildlife enthusiast are enjoying and paying good money to view sharks in their natural habitats. Operations to take tourists to view, dive or snorkel with sharks and rays are located across the globe.

A recent study found that shark tourism companies operate in 83 locations in 29 countries (Gallagher and Hammerschlag 2011).  Divers are very interested in seeing sharks alive and healthy in the ocean and are willing to pay a lot to see them (White 2008). In Fiji, Vianna et al. (2011) estimated that 78% of all divers visiting the country in 2010 engaged in shark-diving activities. By ‘Shark Savers’. Read more.

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