PATA | Contact

All posts tagged developing countries

Recent research found 70% of people in middle- and high-income countries believe overconsumption is putting our planet and society at risk. Photograph: Seth Wenig/Reuters

 

This week, heads of state are gathering in New York to sign the UN’s new sustainable development goals (SDGs). The main objective is to eradicate poverty by 2030. Beyoncé, One Direction and Malala are on board. It’s set to be a monumental international celebration.

Given all the fanfare, one might think the SDGs are about to offer a fresh plan for how to save the world, but beneath all the hype, it’s business as usual. The main strategy for eradicating poverty is the same: growth.

Growth has been the main object of development for the past 70 years, despite the fact that it’s not working. Since 1980, the global economy has grown by 380%, but the number of people living in poverty on less than $5 (£3.20) a day has increased by more than 1.1 billion. That’s 17 times the population of Britain. So much for the trickle-down effect.

Orthodox economists insist that all we need is yet more growth. More progressive types tell us that we need to shift some of the yields of growth from the richer segments of the population to the poorer ones, evening things out a bit. Neither approach is adequate. Why? Because even at current levels of average global consumption, we’re overshooting our planet’s bio-capacity by more than 50% each year.

 

Read the full article here.

By Jason Hickel from The Guardian

 

Share

Why Entrepreneurship is Overrated as a Solution to Poverty

Categories: Recommended Reading
Comments Off on Why Entrepreneurship is Overrated as a Solution to Poverty

13 August 2015 – You might wonder, then, why did the owner of a successful solar business in Western Uganda recently ask me for a job with BBOXX?  That’s not what entrepreneurs are supposed to do!  And if entrepreneurship is how wealth is created, why does a country’s GDP seem to increase as rates of entrepreneurship go down? Read more.

Share
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

This Update paper re-examines likely trends in global emissions in the absence of effective mitigation and in the absence of major feedbacks from climate change to economic growth. It analyses changes in the variables affecting emissions growth (namely population, economic output, energy demand, and the economic and technological factors affecting the choice among sources of energy) in major countries and regions. It also explores the implications of the Great Crash of 2008, which lowered the long-term growth trajectory of developed countries, but did not slow the immense growth momentum of the largest developing countries, nor end the higher growth of the early twenty first century in other developing countries.

by Professor Ross Garnaut

Download

GARNAUT-CLIMATE-CHANGE-UPDATE-PAPER-3-Global-emissions-trends-1

 

Share
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

The Garnaut Climate Change Review—led by Professor Ross Garnaut—was first commissioned by Australia’s Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments in 2007, to conduct an independent study of the impacts of climate change on the Australian economy.  This paper focuses on five climate change action issues: the choice of discount rate (the valuation of the welfare of people living now relative to people living in future); the presence of uncertainty; the interaction between climate change, its mitigation and the growth of incomes and economic welfare in developing countries; what is an appropriate and proportionate Australian contribution to various levels of international mitigation effort; and the optimal balance between efforts on climate change mitigation and on climate change adaptation.

by Professor Ross Garnaut

Download

GARNAUT-CLIMATE-CHANGE-UPDATE-1-Weighing-the-costs-and-benefits-of-climate-change-action-1

 

 

 

Share