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Internet of Things

Image Source: ITProPortal

We are on the cusp of a technological revolution. Like the World Wide Web before it, the Internet of Things hasn’t come crashing into our lives overnight with all the fanfare of a new iPhone launch.

Rather it is slowly and subtly embedding itself into our everyday lives behind the scenes, changing everything from the way our goods are manufactured to the way we heat our homes. By Joe Jones. Read more.

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Teen to government: Change your typeface, save millions

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An e. You can write it with one fluid swoop of a pen or one tap of the keyboard. The most commonly used letter in the English dictionary. Simple, right? Now imagine it printed out millions of times on thousands of forms and documents. Then think of how much ink would be needed. OK, so that may have been a first for you, but it came naturally to 14-year-old Suvir Mirchandani when he was trying to think of ways to cut waste and save money at his Pittsburgh-area middle school. By Madeleine Stix. Read more.

 

November 02 2015 – The Indonesian government wants to reclaim land in Benoa Bay to develop international tourism. Locals say it will destroy their villages and way of life, forcing fishermen to give up their livelihoods and instead become souvenir sellers. Jeremy Smith Read more.

This report explores the way in which some key drivers could affect the tourism industry, both international and domestic, to the year 2020. An exploration of these trends allows important change agents, on both the supply side and the demand side of tourism, to be highlighted and discussed, strategies formulated by destination managers, and tourism operators to develop tourism in a sustainable way. While the implications extend to all tourism destinations and operations, the focus is on Australia in particular.

by Larry Dwyer, Deborah Edwards, Nina Mistilis, Carolina Roman, Noel Scott and Chris Cooper

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Megatrends Underpinning Tourism to 2020: Analysis of Key Drivers for Change

 

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This report provides a complete summary of the scoping study report which has been undertaken by STCRC, The Impacts of Climate Change on Australian Tourism Destinations: Developing adaptation and response strategies — a scoping study. The goal of the project was to build a framework to inform and prioritise adaptation strategies which can be undertaken by destinations and tourism businesses. To do this, the climate change vulnerability of each destination was assessed, with a focus on the potential impacts on tourism infrastructure, activities and operational costs. Summary chapters highlighting key research, findings and recommendations for each of the case study regions are included in this document.

by STCRC

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The Impacts of Climate Change Summary Cover Image

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Following discussions within the Tourism and Climate Change Taskforce in 2007–2008, STCRC decided to undertook a study of the potential adaptations to climate change in five key tourist destinations in Australia: Kakadu National Park, the Cairns region (including the Great Barrier Reef and Wet Tropics rainforest), the Blue Mountains, the Barossa Valley and the Victorian Alps.  The research project examines existing knowledge on anticipated biophysical changes and, through primary research (stakeholder interviews and social learning workshops), gauges the expected adaptive approaches of destination communities and the tourism sector to these changes for 2020, 2050 and 2070. It then estimates likely economic consequences. This technical report presents the research findings in full and supports the summary developed by STCRC.

by Stephen Turton, Wade Hadwen and Robyn Wilson (editors)

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