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What does sustainability mean to you personally? How can you engage with issues such as poverty or sustainable consumption that relate to the SDGs?

One approach may be to start by looking at your individual values and establishing a personal sustainability action plan. This should be an achievable, realistic plan to take on a short-term project that you believe in that can lead to a more sustainable lifestyle! Identify changes you would like to make in your daily or weekly activities and start to practice these changes until they become a habit. When establishing your personal sustainability plan, check that it meets the RISE criteria: is it repeatable, inspirational, sustainable, and enjoyable?

There’s no reason to wait till the New Year to make a resolution! Raise awareness now, and take action! Inspire others to join the movement. Remember that challenging yourself or someone else can make a big impact through building strong communities of passionate and like-minded people. Be creative and come up with a plan to make the most of the last month of 2017. For example, how about trying to live a…

FREEcember

…with possible action points such as the following:

  • Try a new approach to your diet: how about a meat-free Monday or milk-/dairy-free week? A dietary shift can help to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions and ultimately have the positive environmental impact you would like to make.
  • Go plastic-free: shop at a local market to avoid unnecessary packaging, use a reusable water bottle, coffee mug or lunch box and most importantly, say no to using plastic bags! You will help keeping our precious world clean and wildlife safe.
  • Spend a gadget-free Sunday: include some time to unplug and disconnect when planning your weekend or your next getaway.  
  • Enjoy a car-free weekend: if you are relying on your car to commute to work during the week, give your car a rest on the weekend and cut carbon emissions by using public transport or a bicycle to get around. This little change will help to reduce pollution from engines and improve air quality.

 

If this is something you are already doing, maybe you find some more idea with a

DOcember

  • Stay healthy: start a fitness– or yoga-challenge, join a gym class or simply take the stairs instead of an elevator whenever possible.
  • Start a 5-minute journal to become more mindful and live with intention.
  • Recycle and upcycle with do-it-yourself projects to reduce waste to landfill and to reduce waste generated in manufacturing processes! You can also donate unwanted clothes or other household items to a charity to help people in need.
  • Carry a reusable shopping bag with you every day, and keep a reusable drinking cup at your office to purchase your after-lunch refreshment in a eco-friendly way.

 

Your passion is the fire that fuels your action, so keep helpful reminders about why you want to live more sustainably. We dare you to establish a sustainability plan that can help guide your way to a more eco-conscious lifestyle.

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The paperless kitchen challenge

Categories: Green Tips, Planet
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The paperless kitchen challenge

Have you ever considered the potential positive impact to the environment and to your pocket of a paperless kitchen? We all use paper towels for cleaning up those little culinary mishaps; we use paper napkins at the dining table, and many of us carry our snacks to work in paper bags.

Take up the challenge of going paperless in your kitchen.

Why have a paperless kitchen?

Most paper towels cannot be recycled. Many are made of recycled paper and the fibres are at the end of their life cycle. Used paper towels also harbour bacteria and this not only raises concerns about hygiene but could also damage, potentially, other perfectly recyclable materials.

N.B. : Used paper towels, napkins and tissues are compostable

Adopting a paperless kitchen is a simple switch to reduce your kitchen waste and paper costs!

Making the switch

Getting started can be a challenge – but in developing this positive approach you can make a huge difference to your lifestyle.

Top tips:

Photo credit: The Linen Works

Photo credit: The Linen Works

1. Set a timeline

A slow yet steady transition is the best course. Remember to use a cloth whenever possible and you can gradually reduce the dependence on paper towels. Set yourself a deadline for dispensing totally with the paper alternatives!

2. Buy natural-fibre fabric

Invest in new towels and napkins before you run out of paper napkins and paper. Choose eco-friendly natural-fibres for your napkins, dish towels or hand towels whenever possible. Browse sites such as PaperlessKitchen.com to find your perfect natural cleaning cloths.

3. Replace paper towels with reusable rags

Look around your house for items such as old bathroom hand towels and cotton t-shirts. Cut them into manageable sizes for use around your home. Learn how to turn old t-shirts into rags.

4. Develop a system that works for your kitchen

Make the switch to a paperless kitchen easy to implement. For example, use colour coding for all your cloths in the kitchen and bathroom. When your whole family is on board, going paperless is possible.shutterstock_308344490

Check out these useful links:

•   Clever Ways to Store Your Kitchen Linens

•   Declutter Kitchen Towels & Dish Cloths

5. Laundry

Worried about the extra laundry? Soak the cloths in warm water with baking soda or vinegar to remove any grease before washing and rinsing as normal.

Being paper-free in your kitchen can be a challenge. It needs dedication and commitment and it does require a little extra work – the rewards are found in the cost savings and the benefits to our environment.

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Challenge Yourself – Have a Plastic Free July!

Categories: Green Tips
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Plastic Free July

Image Source: plasticfreejuly.org

Plastic is used daily, in the form of bags, bottles, packaging and many more. Sometimes we use plastic for only a brief moment to carry our groceries home or to drink a cup of coffee, but it can take up to 1000 years to decompose. Plastic is destructive for the environment, it lowers the fertility of our soils and is harmful for wildlife. More plastic has been produced in the first ten years of this century than its predecessor. So try to start reducing plastic waste by reusing daily plastic items and recycling.

Here are 8 ways to reduce plastic waste:

  • Purchase your own reusable bag
  • Don’t use straws
  • Buy boxes instead of bottles for laundry detergent for example
  • Use Reusable containers to pack your food
  • Purchase your reusable bottle
  • Make your own juices, healthier and no packaging
  • Talk to others on how they can reduce plastic waste
  • If you own a store, offer a discount to those with reusable bags or put a price on plastic bags to remind everyone that these are bad for the environment

What Are You Doing For Plastic-Free July?

Learn more about how to reduce the amount of plastic in the environment with these 17 tips to use less plastic. For more tips on how to make this plastic free July most successful click here!

Take action and join the Plastic Free July Challenge now; a challenge accessible to everyone to educate us on how to reduce plastic waste.

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