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The Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre (Credit: Green Hotelier)

The meetings, incentives, conferences and exhibitions (MICE) sector has a bigger role to play in measuring and promoting sustainable travel according to Stewart Moore of EarthCheck.

The MICE sector represents big business, delivering major economic benefits that are a key contributor to the growth in tourism and leisure development worldwide. And the benefits from MICE extend far beyond the actual hosting of the event, with trade opportunities being generated in both host and visitor countries: tourism represents 5% of global GDP and contributes to more than 8% of total employment.

“The sheer size and reach of the tourism and travel sector now gives it a substantial voice, but it is important to recognise that you can’t manage what you can’t measure,” EarthCheck CEO and founder, Stewart Moore said.

Mr Moore said he is surprised that MICE operators and tourism groups worldwide, who are doing excellent work in sustainability, seem to be still hesitant to share their stories.

 

Read the full article what the MICE industry can do more to promote sustainable travel here.

By  for The Green Hotelier.

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Credit: Shutterstock

 

What does sustainability mean to you personally? How can you engage with issues such as poverty or sustainable consumption that relate to the SDGs?

One approach may be to start by looking at your individual values and establishing a personal sustainability action plan. This should be an achievable, realistic plan to take on a short-term project that you believe in that can lead to a more sustainable lifestyle! Identify changes you would like to make in your daily or weekly activities and start to practice these changes until they become a habit. When establishing your personal sustainability plan, check that it meets the RISE criteria: is it repeatable, inspirational, sustainable, and enjoyable?

There’s no reason to wait till the New Year to make a resolution! Raise awareness now, and take action! Inspire others to join the movement. Remember that challenging yourself or someone else can make a big impact through building strong communities of passionate and like-minded people. Be creative and come up with a plan to make the most of the last month of 2017. For example, how about trying to live a…

FREEcember

…with possible action points such as the following:

  • Try a new approach to your diet: how about a meat-free Monday or milk-/dairy-free week? A dietary shift can help to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions and ultimately have the positive environmental impact you would like to make.
  • Go plastic-free: shop at a local market to avoid unnecessary packaging, use a reusable water bottle, coffee mug or lunch box and most importantly, say no to using plastic bags! You will help keeping our precious world clean and wildlife safe.
  • Spend a gadget-free Sunday: include some time to unplug and disconnect when planning your weekend or your next getaway.  
  • Enjoy a car-free weekend: if you are relying on your car to commute to work during the week, give your car a rest on the weekend and cut carbon emissions by using public transport or a bicycle to get around. This little change will help to reduce pollution from engines and improve air quality.

 

If this is something you are already doing, maybe you find some more idea with a

DOcember

  • Stay healthy: start a fitness– or yoga-challenge, join a gym class or simply take the stairs instead of an elevator whenever possible.
  • Start a 5-minute journal to become more mindful and live with intention.
  • Recycle and upcycle with do-it-yourself projects to reduce waste to landfill and to reduce waste generated in manufacturing processes! You can also donate unwanted clothes or other household items to a charity to help people in need.
  • Carry a reusable shopping bag with you every day, and keep a reusable drinking cup at your office to purchase your after-lunch refreshment in a eco-friendly way.

 

Your passion is the fire that fuels your action, so keep helpful reminders about why you want to live more sustainably. We dare you to establish a sustainability plan that can help guide your way to a more eco-conscious lifestyle.

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How a lame baby pachyderm inspired an art project that has raised millions for elephant care

After a decade of touring the world to raise funds for Asia’s pachyderms, the Elephant Parade art exhibition is back in Chiang Mai where it all started and celebrating its tenth anniversary with 89 colourful statutes of elephantine tykes on display all around the city. Mike Spits, the co-founder, recently opened the Elephant Parade studio in Chiang Mai, and was happy to share the success story with his supporters. By Phoowadon Duangmee, The Nation. Read more.

The Elephant Parade on display at Maya shopping mall in Chiang Mai province. Photo credit: Phoowadon Duangmee

The Elephant Parade on display at Maya shopping mall in Chiang Mai province. Photo credit: Phoowadon Duangmee

 

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October 21 2015 – Following the earthquake that struck Nepal earlier this year, many in the country’s tourism industry, supported by friends and colleagues from around the world, began to collaborate on ideas and solutions for how to get its tourism industry back on its feet as quickly as possible. Jeremy Smith Read more.

 

United Nations System and International Organizations Applaud Sustainable Development Commitments Made by the World’s Governments to Battle Illegal Wildlife Trade

Categories: Recommended Reading, Wildlife
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September 27 2015 –  At an event hosted by the governments of Gabon and Germany and partners, leaders from U.N. member states and international organizations pledged their support today in tackling the growing problem of illegal wildlife trafficking at the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Central Park Zoo in New York City. Press Release Read more. 

Asia’s environmental awareness slowly growing

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Green, sustainable, environmentally friendly, ecotourism. These terms are increasingly heard in recent years wherever the business events industry meets. Even conferences, such as the Inaugural Conference on Sustainable Tourism and Hospitality in Asia, held in Hiroshima, Japan in October, now focus on the topic. Garry Marchant. Read more. 

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From Davos to Copenhagen and Beyond: Advancing Tourism’s Response to Climate Change is a background paper on the UNWTO Davos Declaration and the actions following.

by UNWTO

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The purpose of Promoting Persuasion in Protected Areas is to help protected area managers make better decisions and to achieve greater success in their use of communication to influence visitor behaviour. Many managers, and some tourism operators, see this as an important part of their job. While others can learn and apply the approach outlined in this manual, and while the methods can be adapted for influencing many different kinds of behaviours, this manual is written for protected area managers who want to influence the behaviour of people who visit their sites.

by Sam H Ham, Terry J Brown, Jim Curtis, Betty Weiler, Michael Hughes and Mark Poll

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Promoting Persuasion in Protected Areas: A guide for Managers who want to use Strategic Communication to Influence Visitor Behaviour

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Human Waste Contamination at Huts and Campsites in the Back Country of Tasmania

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The introduction of a minimal impact bushwalking (MIB) education campaign has alerted walkers to preferred behavioural practices in natural environments. However, despite the introduction of this campaign in Tasmania in 1987, there are still issues relating to visitor impact in back-country environments. The impact of visitors on the natural environment is often measured in terms of vegetation loss or track erosion. Impacts dealing with water quality issues have also been researched to a lesser degree. However, despite the visual impact of  inadequately buried human faeces at campsites, there has been very little work done on the extent of this problem, and on associated health risks.

by Kerry Bridle, Jamie Kirkpatrick and Julie von Platen

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Bridle_Waste-CampsitesTAS

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I was equally surprised, delighted and impressed that Mr. Ehlers introduced the term “Turismo Consciente” as the theme of our deliberations today because, quite independently of Mr. Ehlers, I put together the words “conscious” and “travel” in my own thoughts and writings just about two years ago. I had been developing a community – based program called Places That Care. Frustrated at the slow speed with which the tourism industry was adopting sustainable practices, I was looking for evidence that a market might exist for providers who took responsibility for protecting the natural and cultural environment on which they depended. I came across a significant body of international research – not in tourism, I might add – that showed how many consumers were responding to the fateful events of 2007 – 2008 when the global economy fell on its knees. The recession accelerated a shift that had begin in the late 70s in which a growing segment of the population had decided that “mindless consumption” wasn’t for them. A snippet from a report by Ogilvy and Mather jumped out at me:

 

It is an undeniable fact: The recession has created not only a universal sense of anxiety and fear, but a greater level of consciousness across all ages and genders. We can’t go back. We have heightened our perception; we are awake, aware and alert – whether we like it or not.

 

As I associate the state of being awake, aware and alert with being conscious, you can imagine my curiosity peaked upon discovering another research study, conducted quite independently, that described a new, post –recessionary consumer as being a Conscious Consumer. Not long after that, I was introduced to the groundbreaking work of some very successful business men and women (owners and senior executives of companies such as Whole Foods, Southwest Airlines, Amazon, Google, Patagonia etc) who were calling themselves “Conscious Capitalists” and I began to imagine what a “conscious traveler” might look like. I created the blog Conscious Travel to share these observations; to sense what reaction they evoked and to create a space where the concept could incubate and develop.

In my mind, the concept of Conscious Travel has three forms: by Anna Pollock. Read More.

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