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All posts tagged Attraction

Panamanian Jungle

It’s 10 am on a Tuesday in the Tres Brazos jungle, a jagged two-hour trek outside Panama City, where a handful of American twentysomethings have been awake and working since sunrise.

Aaron Prairie leads a group of biology students on a nature hike, using a machete to hack his way through an overgrown trail. Max Cooper cuts long strips of plywood with an electric saw powered by a solar generator, the beginnings of an open-air thatch hut he’ll eventually build by hand.

Jake Cardoza is on his hands and knees in the adjacent permaculture farm, planting a baby banana tree. A few yards away in the kitchen, also fashioned as an open-air thatch hut, Brigitte Desvaux chops onions. Later, she’ll saute them for dinner along with with fresh katuk, a tropical green with a nutty taste, harvested from the farm that morning. By Carly Schwartz. Read more.

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The Last of the Pink Dolphins

With the number of these unique mammals plummeting due to development, land reclamation and pollution, now is the time to see them before it’s too late.

When Simon Holliday jumped into the water to swim from Hong Kong to Macau on 24 May 2014, he was feeling anything but ready. Kate Springer Read more.

This study sought to gain further understanding on two aspects of the attractions sector and had two aims. Firstly, to examine the economic impact of Australian Capital Territory (ACT) attractions through analysing direct tourist expenditure attributable to the attractions as well as the expenditure by the attractions themselves within the ACT economy. Secondly it aimed to explore the visitation patterns of the ACT attractions through analysing tourist visitation, length of stay and travel recommendations.

by Brent W. Ritchie and Tracey J. Dickson

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ACT Attractions: Direct Visitor Expenditure and Visitation Patterns Study

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In light of the rapidly growing tourism industry in the region, excessive tourist use of the dune lakes on Fraser Island could deleteriously affect their ecology and in turn, their aesthetic appeal to tourists. The findings from this research study suggest that the current level of tourist pressure on the perched dune lakes on Fraser Island is likely to have a significant long-term impact on the ecological health of these systems.

by Wade Hadwen, Angela Arthington, Stuart Bunn and Thorsten Mosisch

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Effects of Tourism on Fraser Islands Dune Lakes

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In response to concerns over the influence of visitor activities on site ecosystem health, natural resource managers have expressed an interest in predictive models that might be able to identify affected sites before deleterious impacts have occurred. Hadwen, Arthington and Mosisch (2003) developed one such predictive model, known as the Tourist Pressure Index or TPI. Their TPI aimed to predict visitor numbers to significant sites (pristine lakes) on the World Heritage Listed Fraser Island (Queensland, Australia). In this study, we sought to apply the TPI model to sites on Fraser Island and developed thresholds for Early Warning and Management Action that can be used by natural resource managers to respond to site use before they become degraded from excessive visitor use.

by Wade Hadwen and Angela Arthington

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Where Do They Go? Predicting Visitation Intensity at Focal Tourist Sites within Protected Areas

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This report presents the results of an economics component of the National Interdisciplinary Project (NIP) on wildlife tourism in Australia. The main objectives of the study were to outline and assess the role that economics can play in the valuation and management of wildlife-based tourism, undertake appropriate case studies to highlight the value of economics and its limits in assessing wildlife tourism in each case, take into account relevant environmental issues involved in wildlife tourism, and make future recommendations.

by Clem Tisdell and Clevo Wilson

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Economics, Wildlife Tourism and Conversation: Three Case Studies

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