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All posts tagged Aquatic Ecosystem


26 October 2015 – A marine reserve the size of California has just been declared around the tiny Micronesian islands of Palau.

If you’re a diver, you’re smiling right now.

In this massive reserve, the largest in the Pacific, there will be no fishing or mining, but plenty of world-class diving where fish, sharks, turtles and rays will be protected. Cayla Dengate Read more.

Guidelines for Design and Implementation of Monitoring Programs to Assess Visitor Impacts in and Around Aquatic Ecosystems within Protected Areas

Categories: Land, Monitoring & Evaluation, Report, Survey, Visitors, Water
Comments Off on Guidelines for Design and Implementation of Monitoring Programs to Assess Visitor Impacts in and Around Aquatic Ecosystems within Protected Areas

This report documents the design, implementation, analysis and interpretation of field trials of indicators that were selected to assess visitor impacts in and around focal swimming holes.

by Wade L. Hadwen, Angela H. Arthington and Paul I. Boon

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With over 400 species of sharks inhabiting almost every aquatic ecosystem, divers and wildlife enthusiast are enjoying and paying good money to view sharks in their natural habitats. Operations to take tourists to view, dive or snorkel with sharks and rays are located across the globe.

A recent study found that shark tourism companies operate in 83 locations in 29 countries (Gallagher and Hammerschlag 2011).  Divers are very interested in seeing sharks alive and healthy in the ocean and are willing to pay a lot to see them (White 2008). In Fiji, Vianna et al. (2011) estimated that 78% of all divers visiting the country in 2010 engaged in shark-diving activities. By ‘Shark Savers’. Read more.

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