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Silly Animals for Hump Day Wednesday

Categories: Fauna, Planet, Recommended Reading, Wildlife
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Hump Day Wednesday is here, the dreaded middle of the work week. To help you get over that hill, we present you with our favourite finalists of this year’s Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards featuring cute and silly animals. Enjoy!

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Silly Animals Edward Kopeschny Midland Ontario Phone: 705-528-1636 Email: edkophoto@yahoo.com Title: Mrs Happy Description: One very content snowy owl. Animal: Snowy Owl Location of shot: Minesing, Ontario, Canada

 

Silly Animals Barb D'Arpino Wasaga Beach Phone: 705 429-4592 Email: barbaralynne@rogers.com Title: No butter or salt? Description: Eastern Chipmunk stuffing her cheeks with corn until they looked ready to pop. Animal: Eastern Chipmunk Location of shot: Wasaga Beach, Ontario, Canada

 

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Silly Animals George Dian Balan Brussels Belgium Phone: +32484744195 Email: dian.balan@gmail.com Title: Push Me Pull You Description: Two wide rhinos organised back-to-back in defence formation seem to be the rarest creature in Africa, Push Me Pull You. Animal: wide rhino Location of shot: Laikipia, Kenya

 

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Click here to check out the rest of the finalists!

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Animal Selfies: The Problem with Putting Ego Over Responsibility

Categories: Recommended Reading
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Image source: Green Global Travel

Image source: Green Global Travel

The selfie culture has become a worldwide phenomenon over the last decade, fueled by a narcissistic need for people to share every second of their life on social media. Coupled with a sense of self-entitlement and a complete lack of awareness, this has led to increasingly irresponsible travel behavior in the form of animal selfies, which contribute to wildlife exploitation and animal abuse on a global scale. By Brett Love & Mary Gabbett. Read more.

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Be a farmer for a day in Crete

Categories: Recommended Reading
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Traditional bread making at Agreco

Traditional bread making at Agreco

13 September 2015 – Shy, directionless squeezing is not the way to bountiful buckets of milk. That’s what occurs to me, high in the sweet and fertile heartland of Crete, as I try to get to grips with the ancient art of goat-milking. Retaining a purchase on the teat while avoiding being nipped or kicked demands a lot of concentration. Emily Payne Read more.

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The aim of this summary is to provide a ‘snapshot’ of Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre (STCRC) research that informs the wildlife – tourism relationship and its management. STCRC completed a major research program to identify opportunities for wildlife tourism in Australia and to facilitate enhancement of its sustainability. After six years of research, the Wildlife Tourism Subprogram has built up an expansive range of publications and a wealth of collective knowledge, which are presented in this snapshot.

by STCRC

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Wildlife Tourism: Challenges, Opportunities and Managing the Future

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The research objective of the present project was to determine the relative impacts of disposal of human wastes on vegetation and soils in Tasmanian vegetation types that occur in areas used for wild country camping, with particular emphasis on the impact of digging, the impact of nutrient accessions, the persistence of  paper products, such as tissues, and the disturbance of burials by native animals.

by Jamie Kirkpatrick and Kerry Bridle

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