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SOURCE: Lars Leetaru, NY Times

IATAestimates that over 4.3 billion passengers flew on an airplane in 2017, with the average traveler flying at least once every 22 months.

With the demand for flights increasing annually, the environmental impact of air travel is significant. Some estimates show that the carbon impact of travel is over 3 times higher than expected.

Here are some steps you can take to become a more ‘sustainable traveler’:

  • According to the Environmental Protection Agency aircrafts account for 12% of all U.S. greenhouse gas emissions from transportation. Using rail is a better alternative if available.
  • Avoiding multiple layovers and shorter flights are options to minimize your impact by reducing pollution per passenger mile. Fly direct as much as possible.
  • Using local public transport is an easy way for you to reduce your impact personally!
  • Consider using a bike rental to explore a new city.

Although air travel as we know it today has not been at the forefront of the sustainability movement, the prospects for a future of sustainable travel look promising. With fuel efficient planes on the horizon, the potential for low-carbon biofuels to replace up to 30% of jet fuel could lower the carbon intensity to about one third of what it was in 2016.

“Act as if what you’re doing makes a difference. It does” – William James

Read more tips on being a sustainable traveler here.  

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Credit: Shutterstock

Air travel has an impact on both our own health as well as our planet’s. When we think about it – the carbon emissions resulting from it as well as the waste produced, or jet-lag – it may not be the healthiest choice after all. However, there are many ways to make your long-haul flight a better experience by considering the environmental impact, your health, and your sleep cycle.

Book an eco-friendly flight and check whether your airline offers carbon offset programs. You can learn more about offsetting your global travels via PATA partner EarthCheck’s carbon calculator here. Be sure to check out our previous tips on how to reduce your carbon footprint and make the most of your air miles.

When getting ready for your journey at home, start with packing eco-friendly travel essentials that allow you to produce zero waste on your next long flight. For example, bring your own empty water bottle(s) to refill at an airport water fountain after passing security and carry your own slow-energy release snacks (e.g. nuts or dried fruits) in a reusable container or environmental friendly packaging. Drink plenty of water two days before traveling and get some exercise if possible. Bring a thermo flask if you like to drink coffee or tea to avoid disposable cups, both at the airport and on the plane. Little changes and a mindful preparation for your flight can have a positive impact on our earth.

At the terminal, stretch your legs and walk around the terminal before boarding. Remember to refill your water bottles to stay well hydrated during the flight. Choose what works best for you to stay healthy on your travels. By avoiding single-use water bottles, cups or disposable cutlery throughout your travels you will also reduce plastic waste in which our oceans and other places around the world are drowning in.

On board, choose to say ‘No’ to all items that are wrapped in plastic on board, from the headphones to the toiletry bag to minimise waste. Move around the plane, wiggle your feet and toes to keep the blood circulating. Lower your window shades to help keep the aircraft cool. You may even want to consider fasting on a long-haul flight to avoid or reduce jet lag. Read more about three good reasons to fast here.

Ready for take-off? Enjoy your flight and stay green.

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Credit: Shutterstock

 

Excess heat in Phoenix grounded more than 40 flights in recent days, and
scientists say a warming climate could also mean more turbulent rides.

In recent days, American Airlines has been forced to cancel more than 40 flights in Phoenix. The reason: With daytime highs hovering around 120 degrees, it was simply too hot for some smaller jets to take off. Hotter air is thinner air, which makes it more difficult — and sometimes impossible — for planes to generate enough lift.

As the global climate changes, disruptions like these are likely to become more frequent, researchers say, potentially making air travel costlier and less predictable with a greater risk of injury to travelers from increased turbulence.

Read more about climate change affects air travel here.

From Zach Wichter from The New York Times

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What happens on vacation stays on vacation, right? Well, if you’re talking about the impact of your vacation footprint, almost the exact opposite is true. We’ve partnered with Harrah’s Resort SoCal to share some surprising stats about how you’re expending energy on your trips ― and exactly how you can make a difference the next time you travel.

 

Read more by following this link. By HuffPost Partner Studio.

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Is it even worth talking about sustainability in tourism when transportation, the cornerstone of travel, significantly damages the environment? Explore this question with us. Peter Berg Schmidt. Read more.

3 Radical Ideas To Totally Disrupt Air Travel

Categories: Innovation, Private Sector, Recommended Reading, Transportation, Visitors
Comments Off on 3 Radical Ideas To Totally Disrupt Air Travel

Radical Ideas To Totally Disrupt Air Travel

 

September 29, 2015 – If a flight attendant told me that I couldn’t bring my roller bag onto the plane, I might throw a fit. But when the same idea comes from Teague—the preeminent air travel design studio that’s designed the interiors of Boeing planes since 1946—I’ll hear them out. Mark Wilson Read more.

Traveling comes with a high environmental cost. But many people who care about the environment still want to be able to see the world. Could virtual – or virtuous – travel be the answer? Oliver Balch. Read more.
virtual London Eye

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