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Climate change is considered by many to be the biggest global health threat a concern that is driving people to greener behaviour and consumption. Those concerns drive people to go for greener and environmental friendly products but health starts with everyone within.

 

Companies should tackle this issue and ensure the support of happy and healthy employees, not only to meet the development goals of the International Day for Safety and Health at Work 2017, celebrated this week on the 28 April 2017, but also to promote sustainability as it often begins with passionate employees.

 

A healthy workforce can not only demonstrate corporate responsibility, it also positively impacts a company’s bottom line through increased employee productivity and decreased turnover. Moreover, customers are increasingly scrutinising companies’ responsible business practices and expect them to be socially responsible towards your employees with high standards of health, safety and wellbeing. Practicing health and safety will boost a more positive public image for your business. Read more on benefits of healthy workplaces here.

 

Here are some tips on how to maintain a healthy workplace:

 

  1. No pain, no gain

Make arrangements with a local gym to give employees a discount on membership. You can have a trainer from the gym come in first and talk about the role exercise plays in weight control and overall health.

 

  1. Be in control

It is important to stay abreast of one’s health on a frequent basis to identify health problems early. That is why you can offer health checks for your employees to monitor their cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels. Read more here.

 

  1. Serve the right food

According to the Forbes Magazine, we consume too much fatty snacks during worktime. That is why you could offer healthy meals in vending machines or in the canteen instead. When catering food for meetings or events, also opt for healthy options such as fruits and vegetables.

 

  1. Arrange a charity sporting event

You can sponsor a charity sporting event such as a 10K run and motivate your employees to take part by ensuring a donation for every accomplished route. This tactic of event sponsorship not only brings about brand awareness and positive PR, it also encourages employees to stay healthy and fit, the best prevention. Be sure to reward your team with a delicious picnic afterwards!

 

Having a team of healthy employees requires planning and motivation, but ultimately it can save money while protecting a company’s most valuable asset – its people.

 

Read more on how to ensure happiness and sustainability at work by forming a Green Team.

 

 

 

 

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Recent research found 70% of people in middle- and high-income countries believe overconsumption is putting our planet and society at risk. Photograph: Seth Wenig/Reuters

 

This week, heads of state are gathering in New York to sign the UN’s new sustainable development goals (SDGs). The main objective is to eradicate poverty by 2030. Beyoncé, One Direction and Malala are on board. It’s set to be a monumental international celebration.

Given all the fanfare, one might think the SDGs are about to offer a fresh plan for how to save the world, but beneath all the hype, it’s business as usual. The main strategy for eradicating poverty is the same: growth.

Growth has been the main object of development for the past 70 years, despite the fact that it’s not working. Since 1980, the global economy has grown by 380%, but the number of people living in poverty on less than $5 (£3.20) a day has increased by more than 1.1 billion. That’s 17 times the population of Britain. So much for the trickle-down effect.

Orthodox economists insist that all we need is yet more growth. More progressive types tell us that we need to shift some of the yields of growth from the richer segments of the population to the poorer ones, evening things out a bit. Neither approach is adequate. Why? Because even at current levels of average global consumption, we’re overshooting our planet’s bio-capacity by more than 50% each year.

 

Read the full article here.

By Jason Hickel from The Guardian

 

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A report from CDP finds that S&P 500 companies with sustainability strategies are outperforming the other companies on the index. Photograph: Lucas Jackson/Reuters

 

Analysis of S&P 500 companies finds that corporations with sustainability strategies outperform others on the index

A new report by nonprofit CDP, released Tuesday, provides some of the first evidence of a link between business leadership on climate change and a company’s profitability.

The study, which coincides with the climate talks in New York, finds that S&P 500 companies that build sustainability into their core strategies are outperforming those that fail to show leadership.

Specifically, corporations that are actively managing and planning for climate change secure an 18% higher return on investment (ROI) than companies that aren’t – and 67% higher than companies who refuse to disclose their emissions.

The findings could help answer the long-debated industry question of whether sustainability undermines or improves financial results. Read more on how sustainable corporations perform better financially here.

From The Guardian by Jo Confino.

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The UN has declared war on ocean plastic pollution

Photo credit: UNEP/Flickr

The Clean Seas campaign was launched last week, aimed at eliminating major sources of marine plastic and changing shopping habits.

The United Nations has declared war on plastic. In an unexpected announcement that emerged from the Economist World Ocean Summit in Bali last week, the UN officially launched its ‘Clean Seas’ campaign. The goal is to eliminate major sources of pollution, including microplastics in cosmetics and single-use disposable plastics, by pressuring governments and individuals to rethink the way goods are packaged and their own shopping habits. By Katherine Martinko. Read more.

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2015 PATA Grand Award– Environment
The Success of Self-reliance
Jetwing Yala, Yala, Sri Lanka

Jetwing YalaAkin to a phoenix rising from the ashes – recovering after a decade from the devastating tsunami of 2004 – Jetwing brings a truly ‘at-one-with-nature’ concept to a more refined and elegant form with Jetwing Yala. Set within the immediate outskirts of the Yala National Park, Jetwing Yala boasts a tremendous commitment to sustainability and the environment, bringing a wildlife experience complemented with the finest in luxury and comfort. Designed by renowned architect Murad Ismail, the 90 room property overlooks spectacular sand dunes and the Indian Ocean and is a landmark that changes the face of the deep south of Sri Lanka. Jetwing Yala has been created from ground up to be as sustainable as possible with the intention of conserving energy and resources, reusing and recycling and being a part of the environment whilst causing no harm to nature.

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Waste disposal is expensive – for your pocket and for our planet, our only home.

ed_DSC0499_lowAccording to Green Hotelier’s “Waste Management,” a hotel guest generates about 1kg (2lb) of waste per night, more than half of it in paper, plastic and cardboard. In addition to negative environmental impact, minimizing the amount of waste a business produces is important because waste has rising cost implications in both disposal and initial purchase, if the materials are not used. As described by Green Hotelier, in the UK, for example, landfilling costs are now £48 per tonne (1.1 tons) compared to £18 a tonne in 2005.

Tourism operators generate a range of different wastes. The size and type of operation will influence how much waste is produced. The location of the tourism operation will also affect the impact its waste has on the surrounding community and environment. By considering the availability of possible reuse and recycling options, we help reduce waste to landfills.

Reducing the amount of waste is one of the simplest and most effective ways for tourism operators to both reduce their environmental impact and improve their bottom line. Here are some more resources to help you start:

Reducing food waste is becoming a key practice for sustainable tourism. Watch this short video about the problem of food waste:

When food is wasted, other resources are wasted as well: water, energy, time, manpower, land, fertilizer, fuel and packaging, as well as money put into growing, preparing, storing, transporting, and cooking the food. A recent study in the UK calculated that hotels throw away over 20% of the the food they purchase, over half of which is avoidable. For every £1 of food costs thrown in the bin, total costs could be £1.5 to £2 when accounting for lost labour, lost energy, and waste collection costs.

Some hotels cut food waste by altering their dining services, choosing à la carte menus over buffets (buffets have a high propensity for food wastage especially in hot climates). Others properties prefer to give away unused food.

Reducing food waste helps you stop wasting money and other resources. Food waste solutions can payback in less than a year and cut avoidable food waste costs by up 60%.

Learn more how to reduce waste in hospitality and food service from WRAP, or how to reduce and manage food waste in hotels from Green Hotelier.

More and more travelers are heading for cities that promote environmentally friendly transport, renewable energy, and restaurants that serve food from sustainable sources. We take you to Hamburg, Neumarkt, and Freiburg. DW Read more.

Africa

The Africa continent is increasingly becoming a desired destination for millions of world-class travelers, who enjoy the white sandy beaches, wildlife safaris, and cultural tours in every region of Africa.

Some 55.7 million international visitors traveled to Africa in 2013, according to the UN World Tourism Organization. Amini Kajunju Read more.

World’s largest ocean cleanup operation one step closer to launch

 

November 13 2015 – A crowdfunded 100km-long boom to clean up a vast expanse of plastic rubbish in the Pacific is one step closer to reality after successful tests of a scaled-down prototype in the Netherlands last week.

Further trials off the Dutch and Japanese coasts are now slated to begin in the new year. Arthur Neslen Read more.