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Sentosa Development Corporation, Singapore

Categories: Asia, Infrastructure, Management, Planning, Private Sector, Residents, Return, Southeast, Visitors
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Sentosa Development Corporation (SDC) manages Sentosa, a 470-hectare island connected to the city of Singapore by a bridge and a major tourism hub, welcoming over 19 million visitors in 2011. Since 1972, SDC has been tasked with the development, management and promotion of Sentosa Island, which includes an integrated resort (Resorts World Sentosa), 15 hotels, 24 attractions, 195 food, beverage, and retail outlets, and 4,800 residents. The SDC pursues sustainable development that prioritises continued growth while also creating a quality living environment for Singapore’s residents.

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Ljubljana Tourism

Categories: East, Europe, Flora, Infrastructure, Planet, Return
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Next year the Slovenian capital Ljubljana will be Green Capital of Europe 2016, recognition of a decade of transformation for a city that 10 years ago was dominated by cars. The city has always been blessed with green space, with around 46% covered with forest. This was complimented in 2007 by the creation of an ecological zone in the city centre, which is now closed for motorised vehicles, and has been enlarged in the past five years by almost 620%. As the city has become more popular with visitors, Tourism Ljubljana has worked to ensure residents approve of any changes, with surveys measuring local satisfaction and inclusion of the community in the planning process.

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Northeast and Yilan Coast

Categories: Asia, East, Infrastructure, Management, Operations, Planet, Return, Visitors
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The 2km long Coaling Tunnel was built between 1921-24, when Taiwan was still under Japanese occupation. Designed to connect north-south traffic on the island, it was a major thoroughfare until it closed in 1968, when a new road meant it became little used. It reopened in 2008 as a bicycle route that promotes the growth of sustainable tourism. As you exit the tunnel you can join a bicycle path that tours through fishing villages and coastal scenery on a 20km round trip. Since 2008, 1.85 million people have visited the tunnel, bringing almost NT$300 million in benefits to the local economy each year.

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Siemens Tells Us about How Luxury and Integrated Technology Go Hand In Hand

Categories: Accommodations, Asia, Infrastructure, Investment, Private Sector, Return, South
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Siemens tells us about how luxury and integrated technology go hand in hand

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

Hoteliers throughout the world are facing the need to reconcile short-term investments in infrastructure and new technologies with the long-term business goals of profitability, sustainability and investor value creation.

India is emerging as one of the leading travel destinations, with the World Travel Organization forecasting increases in tourism year on year of almost 9 percent, with some 25 million tourists anticipated by 2015. This poses challenges for Indian hotel owners and operators. A project by Siemens for the Leela Palace Hotel in New Delhi illustrates the way in which these challenges are being met, with an integrated approach to energy efficiency, guest comfort, safety and security, and cost management.

Travel and tourism is being affected by the four megatrends of demographic change, globalization, urbanization and climate change. How hoteliers respond to these megatrends, as well as finding ways in which to meet the growing demand and changing and increasing guest expectations, is critical to success. The 16 floor Leela Palace in New Delhi is one of a group of hotels owned and managed by Hotel Leelaventure Ltd, a company established in 1983 in Mumbai. As one of the most celebrated Indian hospitality groups in the five star luxury sector and with numerous hotel and resort properties, meeting guest satisfaction and developing and protecting the Leela brand is key. Located in the diplomatic enclave area of New Delhi, the Leela Palace has 260 guest rooms, several restaurants offering Royal Indian, Modern Japanese, French and Italian gourmet cuisine, and an exclusive spa.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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Indoor Air Quality

Categories: Case Study, Infrastructure, Management, Monitoring & Evaluation, Private Sector, Return
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Indoor Air Quality

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

What is meant by indoor air quality?

According to the US Environmental Protection Agency, indoor air is often more seriously polluted than outdoor air. Given that many of us spend up to 90 per cent of our time indoors or in vehicles this is significant. For general health, well-being and safety reasons, human beings require a comfortable indoor temperature with air free from dust, irritants, pathogens, unpleasant odours, mould and mildew and other contaminants. Many factors affect indoor air quality (IAQ) in hotels and office buildings including:

  • levels of outdoor pollution, caused for example by smog, traffic or aircraft emissions and pesticides
  • sources of indoor pollution including the materials used in the fabric of buildings, carpets and soft furnishings, smoking, cleaning chemicals and the use of perfumes and salon products (see table 1)
  • the rate of exchange between indoor and outdoor air, i.e. ventilation rates and distribution
  • the amount of moisture in the indoor environment, which is considerably increased in hot humid climates, near kitchen areas and if the hotel has a gym, spa or indoor swimming pool. In serious cases this can lead to the growth of mould and mildew which has health implications

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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Responsible Procurement

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

What is Responsible Procurement?

Responsible procurement (also known as sustainable/green procurement, environmentally preferable purchasing [EPP] or sustainable/responsible purchasing) is a process by which environmental, social and ethical considerations are taken into account when making a purchasing decision.

Looking beyond the traditional parameters of price, quality, functionality and availability, it involves choosing products and services that have a lesser or reduced effect on human health, the environment and society when compared to competing items that serve the same purpose.

One of the principles of responsible procurement is life-cycle costing (see more details below). It is a technique that establishes the total costs of purchasing a product or service, from “cradle to grave”, by asking questions relating to each stage of its life cycle.

It considers the following:

  • whether a purchase is necessary at all;
  • what products are made of;
  • under what conditions they have been made;
  • how far they have travelled;
  • their packaging components;
  • how they will be used; and
  • how they will be disposed of.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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Local Infrastructure in Australian Tourist Destinations: Modelling Tourism Demand, and Estimating Costs of Water Provision and Operation

Categories: Case Study, Infrastructure, Oceania, Pacific, Survey, Visitors, Waste, Water
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This research investigates and reviews the options available to fund, provide and operate water and wastewater infrastructure to meet growing tourism needs. This includes identification of costs associated with tourist use of infrastructure and peak capacity requirements. The major benefits include better knowledge and understanding of tourist demands, and the need for water and wastewater infrastructure and analytical tools, enabling councils and other authorities to quantify present and future tourist demands, infrastructure requirements to meet demand, and the associated costs of infrastructure provision and operation.

by Michael AP Taylor, Simon Beecham, Nicholas Holyoak and Ali Hassanli

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International Visitor Safety

Categories: Case Study, Infrastructure, Management, Oceania, Operations, Pacific, Public Sector, Return, Visitors
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The National Visitor Safety Program (NVSP) seeks to undertake timely and effective initiatives to ensure international visitors have a safe and enjoyable stay in Australia. To this end ready access to current data and information on visitor injuries and fatalities is critical. To assist in the process and to build upon previous research this study was initiated to work towards developing a system for gathering timely data related to the safety of international visitors.

by Tracey J. Dickson and Margot Hurrell

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International Visitor Safety

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Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) models are now extensively used to estimate impacts of changes and policies across sectors, including tourism. CGE modelling has been used to simulate the economic impacts of an increase in international, interstate and intrastate tourism to New South Wales and on the rest of Australia.

by Larry Dwyer, Peter Forsyth, Ray Spurr, and Thiep Ho
DwyerImpacts-CGE
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This book presents research into the relationship between self-drive transport and tourism development. It is particularly useful for tourism managers and planners as it provides perspectives and case studies on self-drive tourism in regional Australia, delivering a better understanding of the variety of tourism markets, which use self-drive transport.

by Dean Carson, Iain Waller and Noel Scott

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Drive Tourism: Up the Wall and Around the Bend

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