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Waste disposal is expensive – for your pocket and for our planet, our only home.

ed_DSC0499_lowAccording to Green Hotelier’s “Waste Management,” a hotel guest generates about 1kg (2lb) of waste per night, more than half of it in paper, plastic and cardboard. In addition to negative environmental impact, minimizing the amount of waste a business produces is important because waste has rising cost implications in both disposal and initial purchase, if the materials are not used. As described by Green Hotelier, in the UK, for example, landfilling costs are now £48 per tonne (1.1 tons) compared to £18 a tonne in 2005.

Tourism operators generate a range of different wastes. The size and type of operation will influence how much waste is produced. The location of the tourism operation will also affect the impact its waste has on the surrounding community and environment. By considering the availability of possible reuse and recycling options, we help reduce waste to landfills.

Reducing the amount of waste is one of the simplest and most effective ways for tourism operators to both reduce their environmental impact and improve their bottom line. Here are some more resources to help you start:

Food excessThe problem is so seriously ignored that it’s not included in the criteria for the most advanced green hotel certification schemes. And it can cause tremendous damage to a hotel’s income statement. Too often considered as a necessary evil by hoteliers, food waste is the elephant in the room that the vast majority of operators still try hard to ignore.

Read more here.

Clean, accessible water is vital to tourism, used in most of the tourism businesses, from hotels and restaurants to leisure facilities and transportation. Hotels also depend upon their supply industries, such as agriculture and the food and drink industries, none of which would function without sufficient water.

Thinking about how to conserve water is important. Water conservation can save a significant amount of money by using less: fewer water treatment costs, less labor costs, and less energy use. Using less water also strengthens the local economy as more economic resources are available for the local area. Water conservation also helps protect ecosystems that include tourist attractions that depend on natural resources. Learn more about it from Kuoni’s Water Management Manual for Hotels.

There are many ways to reduce water usage that are more efficient than taking shorter showers, like eating less meat. Here are some useful tips for water conservation that you can easily apply:

Reducing food waste is becoming a key practice for sustainable tourism. Watch this short video about the problem of food waste:

When food is wasted, other resources are wasted as well: water, energy, time, manpower, land, fertilizer, fuel and packaging, as well as money put into growing, preparing, storing, transporting, and cooking the food. A recent study in the UK calculated that hotels throw away over 20% of the the food they purchase, over half of which is avoidable. For every £1 of food costs thrown in the bin, total costs could be £1.5 to £2 when accounting for lost labour, lost energy, and waste collection costs.

Some hotels cut food waste by altering their dining services, choosing à la carte menus over buffets (buffets have a high propensity for food wastage especially in hot climates). Others properties prefer to give away unused food.

Reducing food waste helps you stop wasting money and other resources. Food waste solutions can payback in less than a year and cut avoidable food waste costs by up 60%.

Learn more how to reduce waste in hospitality and food service from WRAP, or how to reduce and manage food waste in hotels from Green Hotelier.

Solar Heaters

Thermal Solar water heating systems (MonoSun Technology Co.,Ltd. Advanced Solar Power,Phuket)

“The numbers of guests have doubled because thanks to the solar panels, the guest houses have functioning showers and warm water is made available for kitchen use,”says Marie Marku from Theth National Park in Albania.

Solar thermal systems use the sun’s light energy to heat water and can be especially efficient in heating water in areas where sunlight is abundant.  The technologies on the market are efficient and highly reliable, making solar power a simple, cost-effective, and sustainable means of heating water. Not only do solar heaters work well in areas where no other water heating options are available, it can also help to reduce operating costs and increase competitiveness. Many hotels in USA and the UK are using different forms of solar energy, with solar heaters as the most common form.

Using solar heaters can be particularly effective in Small Island States as most islands rely almost entirely on imported liquid fossil fuels for energy generation, with high costs of electricity. UNEP recently published a paper, “Solar Water Heating in the Tourism Industry with a Focus on the Caribbean Region,” highlighting the potential contribution of solar heating to reduce carbon emissions.

Facing increasing pressure to improve environmental performance and sustainability, using solar heating can be an efficient solution. Are you one of the businesses to use solar heaters for sustainability and efficiency purposes? If not, what are you waiting for?

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Panamanian Jungle

It’s 10 am on a Tuesday in the Tres Brazos jungle, a jagged two-hour trek outside Panama City, where a handful of American twentysomethings have been awake and working since sunrise.

Aaron Prairie leads a group of biology students on a nature hike, using a machete to hack his way through an overgrown trail. Max Cooper cuts long strips of plywood with an electric saw powered by a solar generator, the beginnings of an open-air thatch hut he’ll eventually build by hand.

Jake Cardoza is on his hands and knees in the adjacent permaculture farm, planting a baby banana tree. A few yards away in the kitchen, also fashioned as an open-air thatch hut, Brigitte Desvaux chops onions. Later, she’ll saute them for dinner along with with fresh katuk, a tropical green with a nutty taste, harvested from the farm that morning. By Carly Schwartz. Read more.

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Responsible Tourism Toolkit – Part 1 Energy Saving Tips

We all know that becoming more energy efficient as a tourism business doesn’t just make business sense by reducing your operational costs, but also helps to minimise and reduce the environmental impact of your business.

by Dr. Louise de Waal

The sustainable vegetables that thrive on a diet of fish poo

November 10 2015 – Who needs soil when you have a fish tank? “Aquaponics” combines growing plants in water, or hydroponics, with fish cultivation, or aquaculture. It’s a symbiotic process that has its roots in Asian farming practices reaching back thousands of years. Brain Snyder Read more.

Estimating Demand for a Special Event and the Events Contribution to a Regional Economy

Categories: Case Study, Cost Reduction, Investment, Management, Monitoring & Evaluation, Oceania, Pacific, Return
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This project was aimed at finding out the relationship between the demand for a special event and the schedule of entrance fees for the event. Two special events, part of a wider event, the Hobart Summer Festival, were examined: Taste of Tasmania and the Australian Wooden Boat Festival.

by John Madden, Nic Groenwold, Prem Thapa

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Estimating Demand for a Special Event and the Events Contribution to a Regional Economy

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This shopping guide provides information on the environmental and social record of companies behind the brand names of common supermarket products. The information is based on assessment gathered from more than 25 sources including the work of organisations such as Greenpeace, Choose Cruelty Free, Corporate Monitor, Friends of the Earth and Responsible Shopper.

by www.ethical.org.au

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The Guide to Ethical Supermarket Shopping 2010

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