PATA | Contact

All posts in Recommended Reading

Blue Economy: a sustainable ocean economic paradigm

Categories: Recommended Reading, Uncategorized
Comments Off on Blue Economy: a sustainable ocean economic paradigm

Credit: Pixabay/Bruno Glätsch

Sustainable Blue Economy Conference – This conference represents an important opportunity to take stock of both the opportunities – and the challenges – which the Blue Economy concept presents, in the context of SDG14 – Life Below Water.

As the single largest natural asset on the planet which represents some 99% of the earth’s living volume, the ocean delivers numerous benefits to humanity.

For the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Blue Economy paradigm is a natural next step in the overall conceptualization and realization of sustainable human development. It mirrors our long-accepted definition of sustainable development as one that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

Click here to read the full article on Blue Economy.

By Andrew Hudson for United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Share

Kickstarter’s New Features Put Sustainability Top-Of-Mind For Creators

Categories: Recommended Reading, Uncategorized
Comments Off on Kickstarter’s New Features Put Sustainability Top-Of-Mind For Creators

People People’Transparent Speaker is designed to be repairable and recyclable.

When creators are planning to launch a product into the world on Kickstarter, they’ll now consider their impact on the environment.

As a crowdfunding platform, Kickstarter gives people the ability to turn a creative idea into a tangible product – anything from games and art to design and technology – thanks to the direct support of others. But as you can imagine, a lot more goes into turning an idea into a product than just raising funds.

An “Environmental Commitments” section has been added to all project pages within Kickstarter’s Design & Tech category, and plans are underway to expand it across more categories.

Read the full article here.

By Daniel Hill for Forbes.

Share

Have Solar Energy And Battery Power Truly Changed Our World?

Categories: Recommended Reading
Comments Off on Have Solar Energy And Battery Power Truly Changed Our World?

Credit: Shutterstock

There is no doubt that solar panels are only going to multiply on an even greater scale.

While not so long ago renewable energy sources seemed like just another pipe dream, today they have become quite mundane, and sometimes considered a life standard which is not to be negotiated. – the predictions show there are going to be 70,000 brand new solar panels every hour in the 5 years to come.

With such a huge number expecting us, read the full article here to find out what kind of impact solar panels have made on the world and what we can expect from it.

Do you think solar energy had changed our lives for the better or worse?

By Susan Josh for blue & green tomorrow.

Share

Credit: Pinterest

Building the business case for healthy workplaces

…more companies are realising these benefits and recognising the business value of putting health at the centre of workplace design. She said: “People in these spaces found work more enjoyable and there was more tenant engagement and greater awareness of the developer’s brand. In a very competitive market, you cannot be competing on rent alone.”

These days, the industry is witnessing greater innovation and creativity to make buildings better places for people. At the building conference, experts shared several ways health and wellness have been integrated into the workplace.

Read the full article here.

By Zafirah Zein for Eco-Business.

Share

Palm oil boycott could actually increase deforestation – sustainable products are the solution

Categories: Recommended Reading
Comments Off on Palm oil boycott could actually increase deforestation – sustainable products are the solution

Credit: Shutterstock

Palm oil can be found in food and cosmetics everywhere: in fact, half of the world’s population uses palm oil in food.

Public awareness about the loss of wildlife through deforestation caused by palm oil crops is growing, and there’s mounting pressure on retailers to reduce their sales of palm oil products, or boycott them altogether.

Recent report by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, concluded that boycotting palm oil would merely shift – rather than counter – losses to rainforests and wildlife caused by agriculture. Put simply, boycotted palm oil would need to be replaced by other types of vegetable oil to meet global demand – and that could actually make matters worse.

Watch the banned Christmas advert by UK-based supermarket chain Iceland – which dramatises the link between palm oil, deforestation and the death of orangutans and read more on the heated debate here.

By Jack Bicknell, Eleanor Slade and Matthew Struebig for The Conversation.

Share

Why is Asia so food insecure?

Categories: Recommended Reading
Comments Off on Why is Asia so food insecure?

Credit: Rajarshi Mitra,CC BY 2.0

Only two countries from Asia Pacific—Singapore and Australia—feature in a global ranking of food security. How can the world’s most populous region improve food security?

One in nine people around the world are hungry—a total of 821 million people worldwide. But global food security is actually improving, with over 70 per cent of countries strengthening their scores in this year’s Global Food Security Index(GFSI). Asia’s farmers are among the most vulnerable to climate change. “Rising sea levels threaten productive coastal areas and river deltas with increasing levels of salinity.

Read more on how we can learn from a tiny island here.

Share

We have 12 years to limit climate change catastrophe, warns UN

Categories: Recommended Reading
Comments Off on We have 12 years to limit climate change catastrophe, warns UN

Credit: Ringo HW Chiu/AP

Urgent changes needed to cut risk of extreme heat, drought, floods and poverty, says IPCC

The world’s leading climate scientists have warned there is only a dozen years for global warming to be kept to a maximum of 1.5C, beyond which even half a degree will significantly worsen the risks of drought, floods, extreme heat and poverty for hundreds of millions of people.

At 2C extremely hot days, such as those experienced in the northern hemisphere this summer, would become more severe and common, increasing heat-related deaths and causing more forest fires.

But the greatest difference would be to nature. Insects, which are vital for pollination of crops, and plants are almost twice as likely to lose half their habitat at 2C compared with 1.5C. Corals would be 99% lost at the higher of the two temperatures, but more than 10% have a chance of surviving if the lower target is reached.

Overwhelmed by climate change? Read more on what you can do here.

By Jonathan Watts for The Guardian.

Share

Credit: Shutterstock

Is plastic food packaging the next thing millennials are going to kill?

More than a million seabirds die every year because of plastic, and puffin numbers on mainland Shetland have fallen dramatically in recent years, in part due to plastic buildup on its beaches. By 2050, it is predicted that 99 percent of the world’s seabirds will have plastic in their guts.

“On an average day, I might buy a plastic-wrapped sandwich from Pret; a plastic yogurt tub or punnet of grapes; sometimes a coffee in a plastic-lined disposable cup. I think about the puffins and feel like a monster.” – Phoebe

Are you worried about plastic pollution too? Read more on why this editor turn away from single-use plastics here.

By Phoebe Hurst for MUNCHIES.

Share

These Indian fishermen take plastic out of the sea and use it to build roads

Categories: Recommended Reading
Comments Off on These Indian fishermen take plastic out of the sea and use it to build roads

Credit: REUTERS/ Danish Ismail

Every one of India’s 1.3 billion people uses an average 11kg of plastic each year. After being used, much of this plastic finds its way to the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean, where it can maim and kill fish, birds and other marine wildlife.

Fisherman in India’s southern state of Kerala are taking on the battle to cut the level of plastic waste in the oceans.

If western nations followed India’s lead of combining political pressure with entrepreneurial ventures, perhaps the world will stand of a chance of avoiding the predicted catastrophe of there being more plastic than fish in the sea by 2050.

Read the full article here.

By John McKenna for World Economic Forum.

 

Share

 

King salmon at Bristol Bay in Alaska, 2013.

A Seattle restaurateur has stopped offering chinook salmon at her restaurants. Renee Erickson, chef and owner of a group of restaurants, including The Walrus and the Carpenter in Ballard, said she made the decision after learning about the plight of J50, the young, ailing orca whale.

“This really tipped the scale for me, being a native Northwesterner and someone who cares about our environment,” said Erickson. “I felt there was no reason to keep buying chinook.”

Chinook salmon, also known as king salmon, is the main food source for Puget Sound-based orcas. Biologists say the scarcity of chinook salmon in recent years has been hard on these whales, whose numbers have dwindled to 75.

Erickson says customers can enjoy other types of salmon.

Read the full article here.

By Ruby de Luna for Kuow.

Share