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Silly Animals for Hump Day Wednesday

Categories: Fauna, Planet, Recommended Reading, Wildlife
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Hump Day Wednesday is here, the dreaded middle of the work week. To help you get over that hill, we present you with our favourite finalists of this year’s Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards featuring cute and silly animals. Enjoy!

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Silly Animals Edward Kopeschny Midland Ontario Phone: 705-528-1636 Email: edkophoto@yahoo.com Title: Mrs Happy Description: One very content snowy owl. Animal: Snowy Owl Location of shot: Minesing, Ontario, Canada

 

Silly Animals Barb D'Arpino Wasaga Beach Phone: 705 429-4592 Email: barbaralynne@rogers.com Title: No butter or salt? Description: Eastern Chipmunk stuffing her cheeks with corn until they looked ready to pop. Animal: Eastern Chipmunk Location of shot: Wasaga Beach, Ontario, Canada

 

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Silly Animals George Dian Balan Brussels Belgium Phone: +32484744195 Email: dian.balan@gmail.com Title: Push Me Pull You Description: Two wide rhinos organised back-to-back in defence formation seem to be the rarest creature in Africa, Push Me Pull You. Animal: wide rhino Location of shot: Laikipia, Kenya

 

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Click here to check out the rest of the finalists!

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TripAdvisor Halts Ticket Sales to Cruel Wildlife Attractions

Categories: Recommended Reading, Uncategorized, Wildlife, Wildlife
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The travel website, which came under pressure earlier this year for promoting and profiting from inhumane tourism activities, also plans to educate users on animal welfare.

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TripAdvisor’s booking company, Viator, will no longer sell tickets to certain activities, including swim-with-the-dolphin experiences, that pose animal welfare and conservation issues.

TripAdvisor, the popular travel review website, and its ticket sales company, Viator, said Tuesday they no longer will sell tickets to hundreds of tourist attractions that are widely accepted as cruel to wild animals, reversing a policy under which the companies had resisted considering the welfare of animals when promoting trips. By Read more for the original article on National Geographic.

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Rides we should not book

Categories: Fauna, Recommended Reading, Wildlife
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A mahout and tourists riding an elephant in Chitwan National Park. Source: TTR Weekly

A mahout and tourists riding an elephant in Chitwan National Park. Source: TTR Weekly

BANGKOK, 9 May 2016: Elephant rides are heading for exit door fast.  That’s the prognosis presented by thousands of tourists who make their voice heard through animal rights’ blogs and social media.

It is also the opinion of a few far-thinking elephant owners. By Don Ross. Read more.

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Diving into Conservation

Categories: Recommended Reading, Sea, Southeast, Water, Wildlife
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Photo: Reef World Foundation/Green Fins

Photo: Reef World Foundation/Green Fins

I was that kid who spent most of his life underwater. I would spend hours swimming around the bottom of the pool, trying to see without the use of a mask, and testing the boundaries of a new world. Whether peering at it through chlorine-filled red eyes, or between winces trying to ignore another ear infection, I have always been fascinated with the underwater environment. I couldn’t wait to learn to dive and I decided at a young age that I would make it my life’s ambition to work with our seas and oceans. That kid is now a professional SCUBA diver and marine biologist working in international conservation focussing largely upon sustainable diving and marine tourism. By JJ Harvey. Read more.

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World Wetlands Day is celebrated every year on 2 February, marking the date of the adoption of the Convention on Wetlands in 1971, known as the Ramsar Convention.

World Wetlands Day Besides providing essential services such as water, food and energy, wetlands offer significant opportunities for tourism, which can in turn deliver economic benefits for local communities and the sustainable management of wetlands.

Revival of wetlands, as in the case of Ein Afek Nature Reserve in Israel, is important for not only nature conservation but also eco-tourism, wetland education, and ecological research. Wetlands offer a range of recreational activities include sunbathing, swimming, boating, diving, snorkeling, photography, bird-watching, and simply enjoying the landscape. If not properly managed, however, tourism can also harm wetland, as in the unfortunate case of China’s Qinghai Province where Qinghai Lake became a huge rubbish dump.

The strong connection between wetlands and tourism brought the World Wetlands Day theme for 2012 to be “Wetlands and Tourism.” Ensuring well-managed tourism practices in and around wetlands and educating tourists on the value of wetlands contributes to the health of the world’s wetlands, and the long-term benefits that wetlands provide to people, wildlife, economics, and biodiversity.

Learn more how about how to successfully use wetlands for tourism through the UNWTO’s Destination Wetlands: Supporting Sustainable Tourism; Wetlands International’s publication Factsheet Wetlands and Poverty Reduction Project or the Use of Wetlands for Sustainable Tourism Management in the Boondall Wetlands Reserve, Australia.

Best Marine and Wildlife Tourism Provider – 2015 InSPIRE Awards

Cinnamon_Wild_Yala201Cinnamon Hotels & Resorts is a motivated and progressive chain of hotels, creating inspired experiences for each and every stakeholder, using a responsible and awakened approach. As a collective of 14 diversified properties across Sri Lanka and the Maldives, the unique community and environmental needs of each destination have been a priority factor. For instance, while wildlife and marine tourism play a key role in our offering, it also becomes a key component of our long-term sustainability and responsibility objectives.

Nature Trails, the Nature and adventure tourism arm of Cinnamon Hotels & Resorts is honoured to showcase Sri Lanka’s natural world as a sustainable tourism product. Nature Trails have a two-pronged approach; on one hand, it is an experience provider, highlighting iconic species such as Leopard, Elephant, Whale, Primates, Birding and dedicated photography tours to collectively promote the islands natural diversity. As its other core purpose, Nature Trails engage in conservation and awareness initiatives that help protect and sustain natural environments.

This sense of responsible integration is present in other initiatives too; engaging with local communities and making them an essential part of the cycle is very much a part of how we do business. For example, we don’t own a single jeep or boat used for our tour work, instead we sub-contract this to adjacent communities. By engaging with them we also inspire entrepreneurship and inculcate sustainable practices in a way that it is mutually beneficial to everyone.

At Cinnamon, Inspired Living means that everyone from our guests to our neighbours and every stakeholder of the Cinnamon offering is encouraged to live life to the fullest, be inspired by vibrant experiences and awakened to the potential of sustainable living.

 

For more information: Cinnamon Hotels & Resorts website

UNEP CBD - Tourism Supporting Biodiversity

A healthy natural environment is one of the world’s most important tourism attractions, and that visiting nature serves to heighten awareness of its intrinsic value for us all, a new manual launched by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) presents guidelines on sustainable tourism and management.

Geared towards being both practical and accessible, Tourism Supporting Biodiversity: A Manual on applying the CBD Guidelines on Biodiversity and Tourism Development, highlights the important role tourism plays for biodiversity and aims to improve knowledge and materials to better integrate biodiversity into sustainable tourism development.

“The manual is a reference tool for planners, developers, managers and decision makers involved with tourism development and resource management in areas of sensitive biodiversity,” said Braulio Ferreira de Souza Dias, CBD Executive Secretary. “The purpose is to help them to mainstream biodiversity concerns and ecosystem services within sustainable tourism development.”

With its emphasis on management and governance, the manual, prepared as a result of experiences compiled by the Secretariat and decisions taken by countries at the eleventh and twelfth meetings of the Conference of the Parties to the CBD, reflects a wider perspective on approaches and experiences in sustainable tourism development and management. It serves to complement the more technical User’s Manual on the CBD Guidelines on Biodiversity and Tourism Development, published in 2007.

The manual is the result of a collaboration between the CBD Secretariat, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and some 140 experts from around the world to identify current trends and upcoming issues and opportunities on the links between sustainable tourism development and the CBD agenda, and is meant to be used as a transformative tool for sustainable consumption.

 

 

Download PDF here

 

FINALIST – 2015 Wild Asia Responsible Tourism Awards, Best in Community Engagement & Development

IMG_2626-e1440147722754Creating unforgettable learning experiences in the Cambodian provinces of Kratie and Stung Treng, CRDTours works closely with their partner NGO, CRDT (Cambodian Rural Development Team) to create sustainable changes through community-based tourism initiatives, such as rural development and environmental conservation.

Not only does CRDTours give tourists hands-on cultural experiences, such as whipping up local dishes with their host families, attending traditional religious blessings, and participating in on-going development projects identified by the local communities. But they also make sure the local communities don’t become overly dependent on tourism as a livelihood source by limiting the carrying capacity of visitors to Koh P’dao, an island nestled in the mighty Mekong river and home to a number of their tourist programs.

By expanding their community development tours’ projects to include chicken and pig raising and building toilets and rainwater collection systems, CRDTours is able to reach more beneficiaries and maximize long term benefits while also developing non-tourist centric methods of livelihood such as livestock raising, maintaining home gardens, and environmental education.

Mobilizing local communities key to CRDTours’ success. They are trusted by the local community, provide trainings and improve community awareness about issues such as environmental conservation. During village demonstrations, events, and livelihood trainings focused on deforestation and environmental awareness, 60% of beneficiaries were able to raise at least 3 environmental issues, such as illegal fishing and climate change present in their community and offer solutions.

CRDTours actively involves the local  community members, encouraging them to play a role in development and environmental conservation initiatives, which include:

  • Finding alternative livelihoods to slow/stop the depletion of natural resources
  • Raising awareness about the impact of unsustainable natural resources and gradually change the community’s behavior towards the environment
  • Promoting ecotourism as an incentive for community members to stop harming wildlife and take action to protect it

Ecotourism has been an incentive for communities to protect their rare, Irrawaddy dolphin neighbors and make them proud of their community. Over a quarter of the Community Based Ecotourism (CBET) annual development fund was given to the community fishery for river patrolling. By 2013 community beneficiaries stopped using gillnets (which dolphins are known to get caught in) close to the known dolphin pool and reduced their time spent fishing by 45%. Thanks to the complete removal of gillnets in the area, two baby dolphins were born in the Koh P’dao pool earlier this year.

CRDTours website

France bans imports of lion hunt trophies

France has banned the import of lion heads, paws and skins as hunters’ trophies, nearly four months after the killing of Zimbabwe’s most famous lion by an American trophy hunter sparked international outrage. Adam Vaughan Read more.

The Last of the Pink Dolphins

With the number of these unique mammals plummeting due to development, land reclamation and pollution, now is the time to see them before it’s too late.

When Simon Holliday jumped into the water to swim from Hong Kong to Macau on 24 May 2014, he was feeling anything but ready. Kate Springer Read more.