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Costa Navarino

Categories: Climate, Energy, Europe, Land, Management, Operations, Planet, Private Sector, South
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In order to have a vision, it helps to have a captain at the helm, and Temes S.A had just that. Messinia, in the Peloponnese region of Greece, was the home of shipping magnate Captain Vassilis Constantakopoulos who sought to invest in protecting the land he loved. Although he passed away in 2011, his aim to create luxury, sustainable tourism in Messinia lives on through this collection of high end multi-use resorts. One of Greece’s most significant sustainable tourism developments in recent times, Temes contributes vast amounts to environmental research, has one of the most extensive photovoltaic facilities in Greece and has created the largest olive tree plantation in Europe. And employing 700 people locally, Messinia is in ship shape.

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Basecamp Explorer Kenya

Categories: Africa, Community, Cultural Heritage, East, Land, Management, Operations, People and Places, Planet
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Svein Wilhelmsen founded Basecamp Explorer in 1998, following a meeting with Maasai elder, Chief Ole Taek in Kenya about threats to his people and lands. Wilhelmsen’s mission was to set up a company to care for both. Eagle View camp in the Mara Naboisho Conservancy, Kenya, best illustrates this, where five hundred Maasai families gave their land in trust and, in return, receive a monthly income. This community owned model ensures wildlife conservation, supported by a Basecamp ecological learning centre for local students, an empowerment ethos that also embraces 118 Maasai women, who create crafts for the Basecamp Maasai craft brand, assisted by community managed micro-finance (CMMF) programs. In terms of community support, this camp certainly does have all bases covered.

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Hotels and Resorts in Mountain Areas

Categories: Accommodations, Case Study, Fauna, Flora, Land, Planet, Private Sector
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Hotels and Resorts in Mountain Areas

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

The year 2002 has been designated International Year of Mountains. As the number of people wanting to visit remote locations grows, whether for sport or simply to appreciate nature, preservation of the environment and the ways of the people who live there should be our primary concern

Because of their inaccessibility, mountain areas often support fragile ecosystems and flora and fauna that cannot be found elsewhere in the world. Opening up wilderness areas for trekking or skiing can endanger sensitive wildlife habitats and threaten to overwhelm remote village communities with imported cultures. Below we list some of the many issues to be taken into account if mountain tourism is to be sustainable.

Design and Development

  • Before commencing any plans for hotel or resort development, ensure that members of the local community are fully involved and consulted. Villagers should be allowed to decide if and how they wish to participate in the tourism business. Consultation should be maintained throughout the planning and development process.
  • Ensure that a full environmental impact assessment (EIS) is carried out.
  • Buildings should be designed to blend into the natural contours and colours of the landscape and built in the local, traditional style.
  • Materials should be natural, and, if possible, sourced locally (e.g. local quarries).
  • As far as possible, make sure that local stone masons, carpenters and labourers are employed.
  • Consider how the development can be used to help the community, through improvements to roads or water provision. Make meeting rooms available for community events or clinics. Provide recycling facilities for local people as well as for the hotel’s waste.
  • When fitting out the hotel, find out what the local craftspeople and businesses can produce – such as textiles, furniture, lamps, pottery, art and sculpture. This will not only benefit their economy but give a more welcoming local ‘ambiance’ for guests.
  • Where goods cannot be produced locally, rather than importing from abroad, see what is available through the local market or bazaar.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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Talking Point: India and the Cotton Supply Chain

Categories: Asia, Case Study, Flora, Land, Planet, Private Sector, Return, South, Supply Chain
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Talking Point India and the cotton supply chain

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

Stephanie McIntosh had a career in supply chain development before founding Fou Furnishings, a certified Fairtrade and organic hotel linens supplier, and she published a thesis on developing organic cotton supply chains. Here she explains why it’s important for hoteliers to consider the people within their supply chains.

Cotton is a commodity which hotels procure in vast quantities, whether purchasing or renting linens, and the supply of cotton textiles impacts the lives of tens of millions employed in India’s second industry after agriculture.

Supply chain relationships offer a key way for hoteliers to make a difference to the quality, sustainability, delivery and cost of hotel products, as well as the lives of those working in support of their supply chains. Many hoteliers do not have visibility and consequently control of working conditions further down the supply chain.

The cotton textile supply chain has been subject to well publicised and documented social issues, negatively impacting the reputation of international brands. Simultaneously, the environmental impacts of cotton growing and processing also directly link to the human story. The negative coverage has led some global companies to make changes to their supply chain models and management of supplier responsibility. Changes to traditional supply chain metrics include giving equal weighting to sustainability and social measures, to not only prevent problems before they arise but also to extend the supply chain model beyond compliance, to one that builds social, environmental, and economic value.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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Golf Courses

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

The problems

Concern about the environmental impact of golf courses is not new. Throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, environmentalists and developers were at loggerheads, the former highlighting a raft of problems caused by traditional course development and operation.

These included:

  • Destruction or degradation of local wildlife habitat.
  • Ground and surface water pollution caused by pesticides, fertilizers and other contaminants.
  • Poor stream water quality due to eroding shorelines.
  • Consumption of large quantities of water for irrigation.
  • Unsound turf management driven by increasing and unrealistic golfer expectations and demands.
  • Conflict with local communities over loss of local amenities and access

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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The Good Living Tourism project focused on the lifestyle aspects of food and wine tourism. The project comprised several studies including regional case studies and consumer research. This report presents the findings of two stages of the project: a qualitative study that explored the enhancement factors that help to build the food and wine experience, and a quantitative study that investigated consumer preferences in food and wine tourism.

by Beverley Sparks, Linda Roberts, Marg Deery, Jenny Davies and Lorraine Brown

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Good Living Tourism: Lifestyle Aspects of Food and Wine Tourism

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Food and Wine Tourism in Australia: Tools and Strategies for Industry Development

Categories: Attractions, Case Study, Land, Oceania, Pacific, People and Places, Planet, Private Sector, Visitors
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This Snapshot profiles key research in the field of food and wine tourism, a growing and evolving industry in Australia. This publication has been developed with industry in mind—bringing together summaries, statistics, key findings and recommendations in an easily accessible resource. This research provides a comprehensive examination of food and wine tourism in Australia. There are five individual research projects featured, which cover a variety of elements impacting on and defining Australia’s food and wine tourism segment. This includes an examination of:  the role food and wine plays in attracting tourists to a destination; key characteristics of selected wine regions; profiling food and wine tourists; the relationship between food and wine and consumer lifestyle; purchasing and consumption patterns of the wine tourist and marketing implications

by Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre (STCRC)

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Food and Wine Tourism in Australia: Tools and Strategies for Industry Development

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The tutorials in this kit provide an extensive education of online marketing starting with an initial assessment of your current online marketing status to more complex issues such as online booking systems. Each tutorial includes a helpful header with information about how much time the tutorial will take you to complete and the level of difficulty.

by The Australian Tourism Data Warehouse

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Geotourism is a new discipline and relatively little has been written about either its supply or demand sides. This research note presents the findings of a sample of potential Australian geotourists, all members of the Geological Society of Australia.     The purpose of the study was to explore a potential market of geoscientists to test their interest in participating in commercial geotourism products as a means of developing niche geotourism opportunities in Australia.     The findings show that potential geotourists prefer to undertake geotours independently rather than on organised tours. The majority of respondents wish to increase their knowledge of geological sites and landforms, which is encouraging as an indicator for the development of geotourism in Australia.

by Angus M. Robinson

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Geotourism, if positioned as a supplementary knowledge-adding product within an attractive ecotourism experience will attract affluent ‘over 45 y.o.’ professionals, their partners and friends through alumini and professional interest groups.    This paper outlines how to sustainably market geotourism and the benefits it brings to parks and culture.

by Angus M. Robinson

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