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Inside One Designer’s Plan to Make Brand Logos More Eco-Friendly

Categories: Climate, Marketing, Recommended Reading
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            Credit: Adweek

 

Ecobranding uses less ink without compromising the design.

 

Corporate logos are reproduced millions and billions of times, which means even the smallest logo tweaks can significantly change the amount of ink used. Now, one French designer has hatched an idea for a service to help redesign brand logos—indeed, the who brand-deployment process—to be more environmentally (and economically) friendly.

Sylvain Boyer, a creative director at Interbrand Paris, tells Adweek that he dreamed up the idea for a project called Ecobranding way back in 2013, when he was designing a multicolored birth announcement card for his first daughter.

“When a designer designs a logo for a major brand, this logo will be reproduced millions or billions of times, and all this has an ecological and economical impact.”

 

Read the full article here. 

 

By Tim Nudd for Adweek. 

 

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Pack in, pack out

 

Make sure you don’t leave any trash behind when doing a jungle hike. Food and drink cartons are common items to remember cleaning up but smaller things, such as cigarette butts, toilet paper and food leftovers are often overlooked and can still have a big impact on nature. Food litter can harm animals but also attract them. Make sure you bring food and drinks in reusable containers to avoid littering. Boy Scouts of America has a great article about the proper disposal of waste.

 

Nature and wildlife conservation

 

Be an observer of nature and take in its beauty in from a distance. Avoid walking off-track and don’t pick flowers or remove rocks as this might have more impact on nature than you think. Even though it is tempting to get closer to wild animals such as orangutans and other primates, keep your distance and admire them from afar. It can be dangerous for both humans and animals.

 

Respect local ways and culture

 

When jungle trekking in tropical countries, it can be very hot and humid. Even so, avoid going trekking wearing minimal clothing as this can be very inappropriate in some cultures and local communities, especially when visiting holy places, such as temples. Remember to always ask locals first if you want to take a picture of them and avoid giving gifts to poorer residents as this can encourage begging. Make sure you are well informed about local ways and culture before you go hiking (or before you go to a foreign country in general).

Support the local community

 

Book your jungle trek with a local tour operator and with local guides. This method of touring is win-win because you will support the local community, and because locals have the best knowledge and the best stories about the area you are visiting. Hire local porters, but make sure they are not carrying too much because often they carry almost as much as their body weight up the hills. Also, consider combining your jungle trekking with a community-based tourism experience! When you get to the villages, buy local souvenirs but avoid giving them too much money for it as this can do more harm than good.  

 

Spread the word –  share your knowledge

 

Education is key, share your sustainable experiences with other travellers and friends and in turn you can learn from others.  Express your concern at tour operators and travel companies as the more people that are concerned with environmental issues, the more tour operators will adopt eco-friendly and sustainable practices.

 

For more ideas on responsible camping, check out this Green Tip.

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Credit: Shutterstock

 

A sustainable trip starts at home. When preparing for your next trip, keep these basic travel tips in mind.

 

Flying

Pay attention to your carbon footprint when booking your flight. Some airlines emit more carbon dioxide than others. It’s possible for you to pay a little more to ‘offset’ the carbon dioxide or simply select the trip with the shortest flight time. The less time spent in the air improves your personal contribution to a cleaner environment.  

 

Pack light

Only pack the essentials. Do you really need that extra pair of shoes? More weight means more carbon emissions – and possible excess baggage charges that hit you where it really hurts.

 

Travel closer to home

Remember that there are places closer to home that are just as beautiful and interesting. Staying local benefits your local community and environment. Travelling by train or bus instead of a plane means you are emitting up to 50 percent less carbon dioxide in some cases.

 

Accommodation

Check for evidence of sustainability or eco-certification when making your reservation(s). When hotels or resorts have a proven track record in terms of environmental care and eco-management they will likely promote these features to catch your eye.

Here is a link to help you find some green hotels.

 

Products

Take your own toiletries and avoid using the in-room shampoos and shower gels provided in miniature plastic containers.

Some sunscreens may be harmful to people and the planet.

 

EQ offers organic lifestyle products including sunscreen that are respectful to marine life.

 

Smart Girls Who Surf  offers a line of sunscreen products for body, face and lips. Take your own reusable products, such as bags, tumblers and even chopsticks.

 

Read more about being a responsible traveller in the PATA s Responsible Business Travel Guidelines.

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In April of this year, the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii recorded its first-ever carbon dioxide reading over 410 parts per million (ppm). This is a brand-new state of affairs, as humans have never existed on Earth with CO2 levels over 300 ppm. If carbon emissions continue their current trend, our atmosphere could get to a point it hasn’t been at in 50 million years—when temperatures were 18°F (10°C) higher and there was almost no ice on the planet (meaning there was a lot more water and a lot less land).

There’s long been a consensus between multiple countries to try to limit the temperature change from global warming to two degrees Celsius. This is critical for many reasons, not least the effect hotter temperatures will have (and have already had) on food production.

But author and activist Paul Hawken says two degrees isn’t enough—not nearly enough, in fact. In a moving presentation at Singularity University’s Global Summit last week in San Francisco, Hawken shared details from his recently-released book Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming.

 

Read the full article here and be surprised by at least one of the top solutions from Drawdown’s model.

 

By Vanessa Bates Ramirez for SingularityHub

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Eating sustainably is essential if we are to preserve our planet. Here are five tips about to make a difference.

 

  • Choose local and organic food

 

Try to buy locally-grown food as this has multiple benefits such as fewer greenhouse gas emissions from transporting and refrigerating the food and the preservation of jobs in the local community. There is, thankfully, already an increase in the consumption of local products,

 

Try also to purchase organic foods – grown without artificial pesticides and fertilisers. These foodstuffs are healthier and have less impact upon the environment.

 

  • Choose more plant-based foods

 

Reducing the volume of meat consumption has a significantly beneficial effect upon the environment. Pesticides may be used for meat production and valuable resources are needed to raise livestock such as cattle, pigs and chickens. For example, it is estimated that 16,000 litres of water are needed to produce 1kg of beef. If a family of four skips eating beef once a week it has the same beneficial effect upon the environment as not using a petrol or diesel car for three months. Click here for some healthy vegan recipes.

 

  • Choose seasonal foods

 

Eating seasonal foods means that there is a smaller chance the food has not been grown in artificial conditions nor transported from the other side of the world. Choosing to eat seasonal foods also brings variation to your diet as well that all-important fresh flavour.

 

  • Grow it yourself

 

If you have a garden, big or small, find some space to grow vegetables. It’s fun; it makes you appreciate your food, and it also contributes towards our goal of achieving a healthier, more sustainable world.

 

  • Get inspired and Inspire others

 

Talk to other food lovers who wish to be more environmentally-conscious about where it comes from and how it is grown. Learn more from the producers selling products at your local farmers’ market. Share your new-found knowledge with family and friends. You may learn from each other. Here are some sustainable food documentaries that may also help to inspire you.

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How to create a sustainable school campus

Categories: Climate, Green Tips, People and Places, Waste
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We are all aware of the potential for negative environmental impacts caused by industry and commerce. But what about school and university campuses? Many students living and studying together contribute, inevitably, to the global issues of waste and pollution.

This may not be an issue of paramount concern to students but it is vitally important that we raise awareness of the issue and work together to create more sustainable academic environments. Here are five tips that make a difference.

1. Use your own materials on campus

Plastic bottles, cutlery, plates and cups account for a huge amount of waste on campuses every day. Start with buying, and using daily, your own reusable materials such as a water bottle and container for snacks and lunches.

2. Avoid using paper

Start to digitise. Make sure that e-books are offered instead of paper textbooks for your lectures and take notes on your tablet or laptop (if permitted). Only print when absolutely necessary and promoting student events on social media. Avoid printing and handing out leaflets.

3. Organise a food waste scheme

Check if your campus has a specific scheme to separate and reduce food waste. If this is not the case, spread the word and encourage the administration team to adopt such a scheme. Encourage others by spreading awareness about food waste on social media. Make a short video on your smartphone and share it with your peers. Together, you can make a difference.

4. Cook your meals at home

Instead of buying takeaway meals, cook at home and invite your friends. It’s cheaper, fun and reduces food waste as you have direct control over the size of portions. Keeping leftovers for another tasty meal. This means, inevitably, less packaging – and that’s good for our environment. If you must buy takeout food, use your own container. Find some easy back-to-school recipes here.

5. Cycle or walk to campus

Instead of driving and paying for parking, cycle or walk to the campus. It’s much healthier and so much cheaper.

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Restaurants, campuses, and farmers are battling food waste in their industries. Here’s how you can join the effort.

 

America is one of the largest offenders of food waste in the world, according to a recent survey. Every year, roughly 1.3 billion tons of food is thrown out worldwide, a considerable problem given that agriculture contributes about 22 percent of the planet’s greenhouse gas emissions and 12.7 million people go hungry in America alone.

Entrepreneurs across several sectors have created ways to re-purpose food. Their efforts are admirable and economical, but the biggest difference will be if you make food waste reduction a daily habit.

 

 

Read more about how you can give food a new purpose here.

 

By Joseph Jaafari from NationSwell

 

 

 

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Credit: Shutterstock

 

Excess heat in Phoenix grounded more than 40 flights in recent days, and
scientists say a warming climate could also mean more turbulent rides.

In recent days, American Airlines has been forced to cancel more than 40 flights in Phoenix. The reason: With daytime highs hovering around 120 degrees, it was simply too hot for some smaller jets to take off. Hotter air is thinner air, which makes it more difficult — and sometimes impossible — for planes to generate enough lift.

As the global climate changes, disruptions like these are likely to become more frequent, researchers say, potentially making air travel costlier and less predictable with a greater risk of injury to travelers from increased turbulence.

Read more about climate change affects air travel here.

From Zach Wichter from The New York Times

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The slogan “For The Planet” is projected on the Eiffel Tower as part of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris in December 2015. Francois Mori/AP

 

Representatives from 196 nations made a historic pact on Dec. 12, 2015, in Paris to adopt green energy sources, cut down on climate change emissions and limit the rise of global temperatures — while also cooperating to cope with the impact of unavoidable climate change.

The agreement acknowledges that the threat of climate change is “urgent and potentially irreversible,” and can only be addressed through “the widest possible cooperation by all countries” and “deep reductions in global emissions.”

But how deep will those reductions be — and how soon, and who’s paying for it?

Here are some key figures from the final agreement.

By Camila Domonoske from The Two Way

 

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There’s a big lie about plastic — that you can throw it away. But that’s not true; there is no “away.”

Plastic bottles, plastic bags, snack wrappers, foam takeout containers, foam coffee cups, packing materials: these common, everyday items make up 85% of our waste stream. These items aren’t biodegradable and our ability to recycle them is limited.

 

This societal reliance on throw-away plastic is strangling our environment — particularly our waterways.

More than eight million tons of plastic are dumped into the world’s oceans each year, where it kills animals and fouls waterways and beaches. This isn’t the work of careless litterbugs at the beach. Over 80% of ocean plastic comes from land-based sources. Even if you live inland and take care to properly dispose of your trash, there is a good chance some of your plastic waste has found its way to the sea.

 

Consider the American Great Lakes, where 80% of the litter along the shorelines is plastic. That trash doesn’t stay put — it flows through the canals and river systems through the St. Lawrence Seaway and into the Atlantic Ocean. A takeout container that blows off a Chicago landfill can wind up off the coast of Africa.

From there, the damage gets far worse. Once in the ocean, plastic eventually breaks into micro-particles that cause toxins to enter the food chain.

A single discarded piece of plastic breaks down into millions — and these bits are mistaken for food and ingested by even the smallest organisms on the oceanic food chain. Contaminated zooplankton feed on phytoplankton, which are fed on by small fish, who are fed on by squid — and so it goes on up to our dinner plates.

 

Read the full article here.

 

By Julie Anderson from Los Angeles Time

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