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All posts in Oceania

In case you didn’t know, apparently there is a shortage of sand in the world. Since sand is used in a variety of industries, ranging from construction where it is used in mortar, plaster, concrete, asphalt, as well as being used in the pharmaceutical industry, safe to say that it is a very important resource.

This is why over in New Zealand, a report from AdWeek (via Geek) has revealed that a company called DB Breweries has launched an effort to help with the sand shortage. How, you ask? By asking customers to drink more beer, and to put their empty beer bottles through specially-built machines, where those bottles will be crushed into a sand substitute.

Read more on how drinking beer can help the increase of sand. By Tyler Lee

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Air New Zealand has embarked on significant environmental management programmes that involve all areas of their operations, including airline engineering, marketing, staff, suppliers, customers, tourists and external partners. Over the past eight years, Air New Zealand has achieved a 15% reduction in carbon emissions during a period when their business was growing.

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1. Biofuel test flight crew

2. B767 with winglets over Auckland

5. Scott Base Antarctic research team(1)

3. DOC Partnership announcement 20 April 2012

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Rivers Fiji

Categories: Community, Management, Oceania, Operations, Pacific, People and Places, Private Sector, Visitors
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Carving through steep canyons and lush rainforest, the Navua River in Fiji is both an incredible place to go rafting and an attractive prospect for logging companies. Since 2000, Rivers Fiji has collaborated with indigenous landowners and the logging company that owns the land to create the Upper Navua Conservation Area, a 16km long river corridor that hopefully will save the forest. Today 4,500 guests per year provide US$3 each towards the local communities, who so far have earned more than US$1,000,000. This may well be the only conservation area in the world funded entirely by white-water rafting trips.

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Red Centre’s Green Hotel

Categories: Accommodations, Case Study, Management, Oceania, Operations, Pacific, Private Sector
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Red Centre’s Green Hotel

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

Uluru, (Ayers Rock), the world’s largest monolith, sits in the desert outback in the geographical heart of Australia. Helena Faith Miel, Environmental Consultant comments

It attracts visitors from all over the world wishing to experience the stark beauty of the desert and the 20,000-year old Aboriginal culture. Tourist accommodation for the area is provided by Ayers Rock Resort, which comprises of hotels, apartments, a lodge, camping grounds, a shopping centre and conference facilities.

Managed by Voyages Hotels and Resorts, Ayers Rock Resort was purpose-built in 1984 to blend in with the desert environment and to protect the area’s fragile eco-system.

The company signed on to the Australia Greenhouse Challenge programme and agreed to reduce its energy consumption, even though the resort has been expanding. In 2001, CO2, emissions were reduced by 13.2% through improved energy efficiency and conservation practices.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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The Great Barrier Reef: Working Together to Keep it Great

Categories: Attractions, Case Study, Fauna, Flora, Management, Monitoring & Evaluation, Oceania, Pacific, Planet, Private Sector
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The Great Barrier Reef working together to keep it great

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

The Great Barrier Reef in Australia was the first reef to be recognised by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site and is one of the seven natural wonders of the world

While coral reefs generally are very sensitive to climate change, the Great Barrier Reef is extremely resilient due to its size, diversity and charismatic fauna, which are vital to the reef ecosystem.

The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority is working hard to ensure this diverse habitat is fully protected from environmental harm.

The Reef is one of the world’s largest and most diverse ecosystems. Setting aside its environmental importance, it is also astoundingly beautiful — a wonderland of movement and colour.

It is the beauty and variety of the Reef that brings thousands of visitors to Australia each year and makes it such a big tourist attraction. Spanning over 2,000km (1,243 miles), it is the world’s largest World Heritage site, with over 2,900 separate coral reefs, and is home to thousands of species of fish, coral, reptiles and plants.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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Local Infrastructure in Australian Tourist Destinations: Modelling Tourism Demand, and Estimating Costs of Water Provision and Operation

Categories: Case Study, Infrastructure, Oceania, Pacific, Survey, Visitors, Waste, Water
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This research investigates and reviews the options available to fund, provide and operate water and wastewater infrastructure to meet growing tourism needs. This includes identification of costs associated with tourist use of infrastructure and peak capacity requirements. The major benefits include better knowledge and understanding of tourist demands, and the need for water and wastewater infrastructure and analytical tools, enabling councils and other authorities to quantify present and future tourist demands, infrastructure requirements to meet demand, and the associated costs of infrastructure provision and operation.

by Michael AP Taylor, Simon Beecham, Nicholas Holyoak and Ali Hassanli

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Understanding Urban Tourism Impacts: An Australian Study 

Categories: Community, Oceania, Residents, Survey, Visitors
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The study set out to better understand the perceptions and attitudes of urban host communities toward tourists and tourism, and to understand the impacts that were of most concern to these communities in major cities. Outlined below is a summary of key findings from the local government focus groups and community survey.

by Deborah Edwards, Tony Griffin, Bruce Hayllar and Brent Ritchie

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This study aims to enhance the understanding of tourist experiences and behaviour in urban destinations by analysing the spatial movements of tourists, identifying the key attributes they are seeking in urban destinations, determining how important these attributes are to their experiences, evaluating how two urban destinations performed in relation to these attributes, and assessing whether there are key differences between different types of visitors to urban destinations. The ultimate aim of this project is to inform and guide the future governance and improved functioning of urban tourism destinations by developing a better understanding of the tourist in such settings.

by Deborah Edwards, Tony Griffin, Bruce Hayllar, Tracey Dickson and Stephen Schweinsberg

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This study found understanding the strategic value and design of collaborative linkages in tourism is likely to play a significant role in ensuring businesses’ competitiveness and supporting the sustainability of destinations. Its objectives were to determine the factors that hinder and/or foster collaboration between tourism and/or non-tourism businesses; identify the respondents’ perceptions of costs, benefits, risks, current barriers, and potential actions to encourage collaboration in and across regions. It then used the information to identify gaps, future opportunities and possible directions for collaboration in regional areas.

by Pascal Tremblay and Aggie Wegner

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