PATA | Contact

All posts in Manual

The multiple recent terrorist attacks in diverse places such as London and California ought to be a warning to the tourism industry that it is entering into a new and dangerous age.  In the past, most tourism centers assumed that either they would not be targets of a terrorism attack or that the attack would be against a highly specific and well-known target.  Classically it was assumed that we could almost predict which areas would be most prone to terrorism attacks.  The prevailing paradigm argued that terrorists were most likely to strike locations that were high on the following scales:

  • They were centers where a great deal of economic damage would occur.
  • They were centers could generate mass casualties
  • They were places that had some form of iconic significance
  • They were places that were most likely to be covered by the media.

Scholars and security specialists based this paradigm on attacks such as those in New York, London, and Madrid.  The security and tourism industries however did not consider locations such as in the Middle East as being relevant to tourism.  Both the multiple incidents in Europe and the United States creates enough anomalies to cause tourism scholars and practitioners to question if the former paradigm does not need revisions and updating.  Tourism Tidbits presents this month some of the new realities that tourism professionals need to consider.

Read more here.

Share

Clean, accessible water is vital to tourism, used in most of the tourism businesses, from hotels and restaurants to leisure facilities and transportation. Hotels also depend upon their supply industries, such as agriculture and the food and drink industries, none of which would function without sufficient water.

Thinking about how to conserve water is important. Water conservation can save a significant amount of money by using less: fewer water treatment costs, less labor costs, and less energy use. Using less water also strengthens the local economy as more economic resources are available for the local area. Water conservation also helps protect ecosystems that include tourist attractions that depend on natural resources. Learn more about it from Kuoni’s Water Management Manual for Hotels.

There are many ways to reduce water usage that are more efficient than taking shorter showers, like eating less meat. Here are some useful tips for water conservation that you can easily apply:

UNEP CBD - Tourism Supporting Biodiversity

A healthy natural environment is one of the world’s most important tourism attractions, and that visiting nature serves to heighten awareness of its intrinsic value for us all, a new manual launched by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) presents guidelines on sustainable tourism and management.

Geared towards being both practical and accessible, Tourism Supporting Biodiversity: A Manual on applying the CBD Guidelines on Biodiversity and Tourism Development, highlights the important role tourism plays for biodiversity and aims to improve knowledge and materials to better integrate biodiversity into sustainable tourism development.

“The manual is a reference tool for planners, developers, managers and decision makers involved with tourism development and resource management in areas of sensitive biodiversity,” said Braulio Ferreira de Souza Dias, CBD Executive Secretary. “The purpose is to help them to mainstream biodiversity concerns and ecosystem services within sustainable tourism development.”

With its emphasis on management and governance, the manual, prepared as a result of experiences compiled by the Secretariat and decisions taken by countries at the eleventh and twelfth meetings of the Conference of the Parties to the CBD, reflects a wider perspective on approaches and experiences in sustainable tourism development and management. It serves to complement the more technical User’s Manual on the CBD Guidelines on Biodiversity and Tourism Development, published in 2007.

The manual is the result of a collaboration between the CBD Secretariat, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and some 140 experts from around the world to identify current trends and upcoming issues and opportunities on the links between sustainable tourism development and the CBD agenda, and is meant to be used as a transformative tool for sustainable consumption.

 

 

Download PDF here

 

ECO-PAGES and Eco Champions

Categories: Asia, Certification/Accreditation, East, Innovation, Management, Manual, Operations, Return
Comments Off on ECO-PAGES and Eco Champions
ECO-PAGES and Eco Champions

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

Honk Kong benefits from ECO-PAGES

ECO-PAGES is an environmental database including contacts for equipment and services in pollution prevention and control eco-products, green funds, green groups, environmental-related government departments, certification bodies, ISO 14001-certified companies, environmental event’s organisers and companies committed to protect the environment all over the world.

The recently launched ECO-PAGEs 2004 is the first bilingual edition, listing environmental contacts all over the world in English and Chinese.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

Share

Addressing Human Trafficking in the Hospitality Industry

Categories: Accommodations, Human Rights, Management, Manual, Monitoring & Evaluation, Operations, People and Places, Private Sector
Comments Off on Addressing Human Trafficking in the Hospitality Industry
Addressing Human Trafficking in the Hospitality Industry

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

Our latest Know How Guide has been developed to help hoteliers understand human trafficking and forced labour – what it is, how it may affect them and what actions they can take to reduce the risk of trafficking in their business

Definition of Human Trafficking

Human trafficking is the acquisition of people by improper means such as force, fraud or deception, with the aim of exploiting them. It is a complex problem brought about by inter-related economic, social, cultural, political and personal factors. Those trafficked are exploited into prostitution, forced labour, for the removal of their organs and other emerging forms of trafficking including organised begging, benefit fraud, domestic servitude and forced marriage. In short, it is modern day slavery.

The UN Palermo Protocol definition is globally accepted:

Trafficking in persons shall mean the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons, by means of the threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power or of a position of vulnerability or of the giving or receiving of payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person, for the purpose of exploitation. Exploitation shall include, at a minimum, the exploitation of the prostitution of others or other forms of sexual exploitation, forced labour or services, slavery or practices similar to slavery, servitude or the removal of organs.

Source: United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime  (UNODC)

Throughout this Know-How Guide, the term human trafficking refers to trafficking for both sexual and labour exploitation.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

Share

Human Rights and the Hotel Industry

Categories: Accommodations, Asia, Human Rights, Manual, People and Places, Private Sector, Southeast
Comments Off on Human Rights and the Hotel Industry
image1

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

This Know How Guide is a high-level introduction to human rights for the hotel industry – what human rights are, the context of the hotel industry, steps to implement the UN Guiding Principles and resources for further reading.

It is primarily written for Corporate Responsibility Managers in hotel companies, though it may also be of interest to individual properties. Please download the full guide to see further reading and appendixes. International Tourism Partnership would like to thank Carnstone Partners LLP for their assistance reviewing this Guide.

What are human rights?

Human rights are fundamental principles and standards that aim to secure dignity, freedom and equality for all people. The Universal Declaration on Human Rights of 1948 sets out 30 fundamental human rights. This, together with the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and its two Optional Protocols, form the International Bill of Rights.

Human rights underpin everything we do, from the way staff are treated, their working conditions, to how guests are treated, in the supply chain and how goods and services for the hotel are produced, in the communities where a hotel is based and in the way a hotel or hotel business is run. Many issues are inter-related, e.g. water is not just an environmental issue: access to water is a human rights issue.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

Share

Tourism Risk Management – An Authoritative Guide to Managing Crises in Tourism

Categories: Asia, Management, Manual, Monitoring & Evaluation, Pacific, Report, Risk Management
Comments Off on Tourism Risk Management – An Authoritative Guide to Managing Crises in Tourism

The purpose of this guide is to provide tourism industry members in Asia, the Pacific and beyond with an authoritative guide to risk management. Importantly, the generic risk management process has been adapted to the specific needs of tourism. The guide provides a practical framework within which tourism destinations can identify, analyse, evaluate, treat, monitor and review risks in the tourism context. Although the tourism risk management process has been developed for destinations, the same principles also apply to a tourism business or organization and can easily be adapted for their purposes.

Throughout this guide there are two fundamental roles for tourism in risk management: the first of these is as a partner with government and community agencies in the development of multi-agency, coordinated disaster management plans, systems, procedures and processes which include the needs of tourism; the second is to develop plans and procedures appropriate to a destination and to the specific roles and responsibilities of an organization, to train personnel to those plans, and to conduct regular tests of plans, procedures and personnel with subsequent amendment and update.

A Report Prepared by APEC International Centre for Sustainable Tourism (AICST)
Doone Robertson, Ian Kean, Stewart Moore

In Partnership with UNWTO and PATA

Download

APEC_TourismRiskManagement

×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7
Share

Are You Ready for Business? How to Sell Excursions to UK Tour Operators

Categories: Manual, Tour Operator
Comments Off on Are You Ready for Business? How to Sell Excursions to UK Tour Operators
×
Welcome
  • Name*full name
    0
  • Position*
    1
  • Organisation*
    2
  • Industry/Sector*
    3
  • Email*a valid email address
    4
  • PATA member?*
    Yes
    No
    5
  • Country*select your country
    6
  • 7

This manual forms part of a collection of greener business tools available from the Travel Foundation to help tourism businesses take effective action on sustainable tourism.

by Carole Favre

Download

Manual Carole

Share

The first Pacific Asia Indigenous Tourism Conference was held in Darwin, on the traditional lands of the Larrakia people on the 28th – 30th March 2012. There were 191 delegates from 16 countries representing Indigenous communities, government agencies, the tourism industry and supporting bodies, resolved to adopt principles to guide the development of Indigenous tourism through the following declaration.

Download

The Larrakia Declaration on the Development of Indigenous Tourism

Share

The International Conference on Community Development through Tourism, held in Phnom Penh, Cambodia from 16-17 September 2014, organized by the Royal Government of Cambodia, in collaboration with the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) and the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC).

Download

pata_declaration_2014_thumb_1412590395_thumb

Share