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October 14 2015 – Operation Makesafe is a joint initiative between the Metropolitan Police and Westminster City Council that aims to train staff to spot the signs of CSE. Radisson Blu Hotels and Resorts is the first major business in Westminster to undergo the training, with others expected to participate in the coming weeks.  Read more.

balearics-eco-tax-blog

 

October 15 2015 – Last month Biel Barceló, the vice-president and tourism minister for the Balearics,  told a parliamentary hearing in the islands that the government would once again apply a tourist tax in 2016.

The tax – termed an ‘eco-tax’ – will be spent on “environmental protection, sustainable tourism, the preservation and restoration of cultural heritage, improvement of infrastructure in tourist areas as well as in research, training and development in the tourism sector,” according to Travel Weekly. Jeremy Smith Read more.

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October 05 2015 – The words on the screen a few minutes ago, “We are killing ourselves,” it’s a dramatic and not insignificant statement.  But it has the virtue of being true.

  I am passionate about the oceans because I’m passionate about life and the oceans are life.  We would not survive. John Kerry Read more.

October 01 2015 – This year’s World Tourism Day theme ‘1 Billion Tourists – 1 Billion Opportunities’ sounds like a slogan for an advert to entice consumers to buy a product like a laundry detergent or hamburger. The UNWTO invites us to celebrate 1 billion tourist arrivals per year and the seemingly unlimited growth of the travel and tourism industry; it is hoped that by 2030, almost 2 billion people will have embraced the tourist lifestyle. Travindy Read more.

Basic Disaster and Earthquake Preparedness Advise for Hotels and other Tourism Businesses

Categories: Management, Monitoring & Evaluation, Report, Risk Management
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The terrible earthquake in Nepal once again highlighted the need for disaster preparedness. The tourism and especially the hotel industry have a special duty of care as they deal with large numbers of people who are often not familiar with their environment and the risks of their surroundings.

There is no excuse for tourism businesses not to be as well prepared as possible. As earthquakes are listed as ‘medium probability high impact events’, preparedness, especially in developing and third world countries is often neglected. In many cases building codes are not implemented and local staff may have a risk perception that differs from international standards and common practice and so hinders optimal preparedness and response.

At the end of the day disaster preparedness needs to be enforced by management and become part of the daily agenda. Preparedness is a circular and continuous process that never ends. It includes physical and procedural preparedness.

By Alexander Kesper

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Recovering from the tsunami

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

How did the tourism industry respond to the emergency and what are the issues in the long term

The world changed on 26 December 2004, when 12 countries suffered tsunami as the result of a massive earthquake in the Indian Ocean. Nearly 300,000 people lost their lives, whilst millions have lost their livelihoods.

It took a few days for anyone to realise the true scale of the devastation and the wholesale obliteration of once thriving communities that had been dependent on tourism. Popular destinations in Indonesia, Thailand, Sri Lanka, The Maldives, India’s south east coast and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands were badly affected, and some resorts were completely wiped off the map. Tourism in the region is estimated to be worth some US$30 billion and, for each person working in a resort or hotel there are often many more who depend upon the industry for their income.

It is therefore vital that the major focus is on rebuilding the mechanisms by which so many people can earn their living and that the tourism industry is fully involved in the reconstruction process.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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Tourism Risk Management – An Authoritative Guide to Managing Crises in Tourism

Categories: Asia, Management, Manual, Monitoring & Evaluation, Pacific, Report, Risk Management
Comments Off on Tourism Risk Management – An Authoritative Guide to Managing Crises in Tourism

The purpose of this guide is to provide tourism industry members in Asia, the Pacific and beyond with an authoritative guide to risk management. Importantly, the generic risk management process has been adapted to the specific needs of tourism. The guide provides a practical framework within which tourism destinations can identify, analyse, evaluate, treat, monitor and review risks in the tourism context. Although the tourism risk management process has been developed for destinations, the same principles also apply to a tourism business or organization and can easily be adapted for their purposes.

Throughout this guide there are two fundamental roles for tourism in risk management: the first of these is as a partner with government and community agencies in the development of multi-agency, coordinated disaster management plans, systems, procedures and processes which include the needs of tourism; the second is to develop plans and procedures appropriate to a destination and to the specific roles and responsibilities of an organization, to train personnel to those plans, and to conduct regular tests of plans, procedures and personnel with subsequent amendment and update.

A Report Prepared by APEC International Centre for Sustainable Tourism (AICST)
Doone Robertson, Ian Kean, Stewart Moore

In Partnership with UNWTO and PATA

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APEC_TourismRiskManagement

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This case looks at how Whitsunday Rent-a-Yacht’s Crisis Management Plan coped with Tropical Cyclone Ului, a Category 3 storm system with winds gusts of up to 200 kilometres, crossed the north Queensland coast at 1:00am, Sunday 21 March 2010. The impact caused widespread but moderate damage across the region and cut power for several days to an estimated 60,000 homes and businesses between Airlie Beach and Townsville.

by Tourism Queensland

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Crisis Management Case Study: Whitsunday Rent-a-Yacht

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This case looks at how Whitsunday Private Yacht Charters’ Crisis Management Plan coped with Tropical Cyclone Ului, a Category 3 storm system with winds gusts of up to 200 kilometres, crossed the north Queensland coast at 1:00am, Sunday 21 March 2010. The impact caused widespread but moderate damage across the region and cut power for several days to an estimated 60,000 homes and businesses between Airlie Beach and Townsville.

by Tourism Queensland

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Crisis Management Case Study: Whitsunday Private Yacht Charters

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This case study looks at how Whitsunday Coast Airport’s Crisis Management Plan coped with Tropical Cyclone Ului, a Category 3 storm system with winds gusts of up to 200 kilometres, crossed the north Queensland coast at 1:00am, Sunday 21 March 2010. The impact caused widespread but moderate damage across the region and cut power for several days to an estimated 60,000 homes and businesses between Airlie Beach and Townsville.

by Tourism Queensland

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Crisis Management Case Study: Whitsunday Coast Airport

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