PATA | Contact

All posts in Monitoring & Evaluation

hotels glodge

Hotels and other lodges around the world are increasingly conducting sustainability initiatives in their establishments, according to a new survey, yet most didn’t share information about what they do on their website.

The Green Lodging Trends Report 2016 has been released Green Lodging News and Greenview. The report is based on data from more than 2,000 hotels in 44 countries and covers topics ranging from air quality to energy management to staff involvement. “I am excited to announce the release of this groundbreaking report,” says Glenn Hasek, Publisher & Editor of Green Lodging News. “Since hatching the idea for the report more than a year ago, Greenview and Green Lodging News have worked hard to develop a survey that would uncover the most common, best and most innovative practices, determine what is trending, and create a mechanism for tracking continuous improvement. This report does just that.”

The report includes results of more than 100 questions asked in 11 categories.

Some highlights of the Green Lodging Trends Report 2016:

  • Most respondents (65 percent) indicated they currently offer a 100 percent nonsmoking environment for guests.
  • Seventy percent said they have moved at least 75 percent of their lighting to LEDs.
  • Seventy-one percent said they practice recycling in all common areas of the property.
  • One-half of respondents indicate they sub-meter water consumption.
  • Sixty-nine percent said they reuse graywater (water from sinks, showers, baths, washing machines, dishwashers).
  • Sixty-two percent said at least 50 percent of the green cleaning products used are certified by a third party.
  • Fifty-two percent told us they grow food ingredients, such as herbs or vegetables, on-site.
  • Among respondents in the Americas, 82 percent said they have someone in charge of green initiatives.
  • Seventy-three percent said they give employees the opportunity to volunteer their time and services toward various environmental events and campaigns during regular working hours.
  • Forty-four percent said they sustainability-specific requirements in their procurement of goods and services from suppliers.
  • Sixteen percent said climate change has no impact at all in their decisions to make operational improvements and investments.

Yet when it comes to communicating this initiatives, just 48% of respondents said they allocate space on their websites for the sharing of green practices. And just 54% had ever put out a press release about a green initiative they had undertaken.

In addition to publishing Green Lodging Trends Report 2016, a compare report was prepared for each survey participant, serving as a yardstick to understand the status of each specific practice within the general participant universe. Participating hotel companies also received a portfolio report and snapshot across properties.

Just 48% of respondents said they allocate space on their websites for the sharing of green practices. And just 54% had ever put out a press release about a green initiative they had undertaken.

“If you ask most hoteliers if their hotel is green, they’ll say yes and list some basic practices or for a small portion, their certification,” says Eric Ricaurte, Founder & CEO, Greenview. “But how do they really know if they are keeping up with their competitors on the green front? The Green Lodging Survey gives us all insight into what hotels are doing, should be doing, and where to improve. And collectively, we can accelerate best practices together.”

The Green Lodging Survey is the first of an annual exercise for industry trends and benchmarking. The 2017 survey will open in the second quarter of 2017, with the results published in the fourth quarter of 2017. The survey will be enhanced next year to add new, innovative best practices to the questions. It will be further improved based on participant feedback, particularly in segmenting or adjusting the questions by property type, so that properties can be benchmarked according to property type.

The report is available at no cost by clicking here.

To find the original article on Travindy, click here.

Share

Waste disposal is expensive – for your pocket and for our planet, our only home.

ed_DSC0499_lowAccording to Green Hotelier’s “Waste Management,” a hotel guest generates about 1kg (2lb) of waste per night, more than half of it in paper, plastic and cardboard. In addition to negative environmental impact, minimizing the amount of waste a business produces is important because waste has rising cost implications in both disposal and initial purchase, if the materials are not used. As described by Green Hotelier, in the UK, for example, landfilling costs are now £48 per tonne (1.1 tons) compared to £18 a tonne in 2005.

Tourism operators generate a range of different wastes. The size and type of operation will influence how much waste is produced. The location of the tourism operation will also affect the impact its waste has on the surrounding community and environment. By considering the availability of possible reuse and recycling options, we help reduce waste to landfills.

Reducing the amount of waste is one of the simplest and most effective ways for tourism operators to both reduce their environmental impact and improve their bottom line. Here are some more resources to help you start:

Food excessThe problem is so seriously ignored that it’s not included in the criteria for the most advanced green hotel certification schemes. And it can cause tremendous damage to a hotel’s income statement. Too often considered as a necessary evil by hoteliers, food waste is the elephant in the room that the vast majority of operators still try hard to ignore.

Read more here.

UNEP CBD - Tourism Supporting Biodiversity

A healthy natural environment is one of the world’s most important tourism attractions, and that visiting nature serves to heighten awareness of its intrinsic value for us all, a new manual launched by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) presents guidelines on sustainable tourism and management.

Geared towards being both practical and accessible, Tourism Supporting Biodiversity: A Manual on applying the CBD Guidelines on Biodiversity and Tourism Development, highlights the important role tourism plays for biodiversity and aims to improve knowledge and materials to better integrate biodiversity into sustainable tourism development.

“The manual is a reference tool for planners, developers, managers and decision makers involved with tourism development and resource management in areas of sensitive biodiversity,” said Braulio Ferreira de Souza Dias, CBD Executive Secretary. “The purpose is to help them to mainstream biodiversity concerns and ecosystem services within sustainable tourism development.”

With its emphasis on management and governance, the manual, prepared as a result of experiences compiled by the Secretariat and decisions taken by countries at the eleventh and twelfth meetings of the Conference of the Parties to the CBD, reflects a wider perspective on approaches and experiences in sustainable tourism development and management. It serves to complement the more technical User’s Manual on the CBD Guidelines on Biodiversity and Tourism Development, published in 2007.

The manual is the result of a collaboration between the CBD Secretariat, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and some 140 experts from around the world to identify current trends and upcoming issues and opportunities on the links between sustainable tourism development and the CBD agenda, and is meant to be used as a transformative tool for sustainable consumption.

 

 

Download PDF here

 

More and more travelers are heading for cities that promote environmentally friendly transport, renewable energy, and restaurants that serve food from sustainable sources. We take you to Hamburg, Neumarkt, and Freiburg. DW Read more.

Drought-hit central western Queensland communities look to build resilient future

November 24 2015 – Despite unprecedented drought across a vast area of outback Queensland, a group of local councils has embarked on a long-term planning project aimed at building resilient communities to withstand future dry times and economic challenges. Chrissy Arthur Read more.

Panamanian Jungle

It’s 10 am on a Tuesday in the Tres Brazos jungle, a jagged two-hour trek outside Panama City, where a handful of American twentysomethings have been awake and working since sunrise.

Aaron Prairie leads a group of biology students on a nature hike, using a machete to hack his way through an overgrown trail. Max Cooper cuts long strips of plywood with an electric saw powered by a solar generator, the beginnings of an open-air thatch hut he’ll eventually build by hand.

Jake Cardoza is on his hands and knees in the adjacent permaculture farm, planting a baby banana tree. A few yards away in the kitchen, also fashioned as an open-air thatch hut, Brigitte Desvaux chops onions. Later, she’ll saute them for dinner along with with fresh katuk, a tropical green with a nutty taste, harvested from the farm that morning. By Carly Schwartz. Read more.

Share

The Last of the Pink Dolphins

With the number of these unique mammals plummeting due to development, land reclamation and pollution, now is the time to see them before it’s too late.

When Simon Holliday jumped into the water to swim from Hong Kong to Macau on 24 May 2014, he was feeling anything but ready. Kate Springer Read more.

Tourism Leakage – this is how little your money contributes locally!

Categories: Monitoring & Evaluation, Private Sector, Public Sector, Return
Comments Off on Tourism Leakage – this is how little your money contributes locally!

Tourism LeakageHave you ever heard of tourism leakage? You will be surprised to learn how little of your holiday expenses actually remain to benefit the local community. This is especially an issue in low-resource settings. This article explores why this is so, and why tourism leakage is problematic. Peter Berg Schmidt. Read more.

Responsible Tourism Toolkit – Part 1 Energy Saving Tips

We all know that becoming more energy efficient as a tourism business doesn’t just make business sense by reducing your operational costs, but also helps to minimise and reduce the environmental impact of your business.

by Dr. Louise de Waal