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ITC Hotels Sustains Its Sustainability Credentials

Categories: Accommodations, Asia, Case Study, Management, Operations, Planning, Private Sector, South
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ITC Hotels sustains its sustainability credentials

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

ITC Hotels group is continuing its push to deliver sustainable initiatives in the hospitality industry in India.

Their efforts have been rewarded with ITC Maurya being named ‘Best Eco Friendly Hotel’ in the National Tourism Awards.

ITC Maurya, Delhi has been awarded the ‘Best Eco Friendly Hotel’ at the prestigious National Tourism Awards, hosted by India’s Ministry of Tourism earlier this year. The award recognises ITC Maurya’s outstanding contribution and ongoing commitment to the environment. The hotel received the accolade from the Indian Minister of State for Human Resource Development, Shashi Tharoor, at a ceremony held in New Delhi.

Innovation and cutting edge technology combined with an emphasis on responsible luxury have enabled ITC Maurya to create new benchmarks in energy, water efficiency, solid waste recycling and carbon reduction, making it the largest hotel in the world to be certified LEED® Platinum, (in the Existing Building category), the highest certification awarded by the U.S. Green Building Council.

ITC Maurya was awarded for being a leader in eco practices in India, thanks to the property’s history of implementing sustainable initiatives for over two decades. These include using the largest and first on-site Paraboloid solar concentrators, a first for the global hospitality industry.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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The Maldives, a Sinking Paradise

Categories: Asia, Case Study, Management, Monitoring & Evaluation, Planet, South
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The Maldives a sinking paradise

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

With its turquoise waters and palm-fringed beaches, the Maldives may look like the epitome of a “paradise” destination, but rising seas are forcing the islands and the tourism industry on which its future depends to find sustainable solutions

Estimates from the United Nations (UN) predict that sea levels will rise by 28cm-58cm by the end of the century (based on 1989-1998 levels) as a result of rising temperatures. Scientists believe the major reason is increasing levels of carbon emissions, largely from the burning of fossil fuels, which are causing the melting of ice sheets, glaciers and ice caps—and thermal expansion as the temperature of the sea itself rises. It warns that: “Larger sea level increases of up to one metre by 2100 cannot be ruled out if ice sheets continue to melt as the temperature rises.”

The effect is likely to be greater on island nations, which are “particularly vulnerable to climate change. Their limited size makes them more prone to natural hazards and external shocks, in particular to rises in sea level and threats to their freshwater resources”, the UN says.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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Community Targeted Recruitment in India’s Hotel Sector

Categories: Accommodations, Asia, Case Study, Community, People and Places, Private Sector, South
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Mr.Manjunan Serving the food to the guest in the restaurant at ONV

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

New research by the City & Guilds Centre for Skills Development looks at how Indian hotels can improve recruitment and training to help marginalised individuals from local communities access employment. 

The report case-studied four hotels in Southern India that employ individuals from under-represented groups (such as local and marginalised communities) through unique recruitment and training programmes. Here’s a synopsis of the findings by Chris Gale, Porject Manager City & Guilds Centre for Skills Development.

The tourism industry has weathered the global economic slowdown, with reports suggesting that it now employs more than 255 million people across the globe as it continues to expand into new frontiers in the developing world. But with success comes fresh challenges. One particular issue is how to ensure that local communities are the beneficiaries of tourism growth through access to employment and work-related training.

In this context the City & Guilds Centre for Skills Development explored the experiences of three hotels in Kerala and Karnataka in Southern India, and found that their community targeted approach offers practical examples for the wider industry.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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SLOW LIFE Symposium 2014 Addresses Sustainable Fishing in the Maldives

Categories: Asia, Case Study, Fauna, Management, Monitoring & Evaluation, Planet, Residents, South
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SLOW LIFE Symposium 2014 addresses sustainable fishing in the Maldives

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

On 16th November, delegates at the fifth SLOW LIFE Symposium, hosted at Soneva Fushi pledged their immediate and continued support to secure the future of sustainable fishing in the Maldives

Responding to a direct request from the Maldivian Minister for Fisheries, Mohamed Shainee, to make the country’s existing sustainable fishing practices viable long-term, delegates have agreed to ongoing actions to realise this vision. Strategies outlined for development include a unique programme to explore the finance required to support the future conservation of the waters of Baa Atoll, which is the only UNESCO World Biosphere reserve in the Maldives and home to some of the world’s richest coral reefs and marine ecosystems. They also included exploratory discussions around the viability of ‘debt for nature swaps’ in the Maldives.

The actions come as pressure grows on the Maldives to continue supporting their net-free and shark-free fishing practices, in light of competition from unsustainable fisheries, who can operate more cheaply. Speaking at the conference, Chairman and CEO, Soneva Group and Founder of the SLOW LIFE Symposium Sonu Shivdasani also announced the creation of a $100,000 investment fund to ensure that early stage initiatives can be given the finance required to succeed.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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Siemens Tells Us about How Luxury and Integrated Technology Go Hand In Hand

Categories: Accommodations, Asia, Infrastructure, Investment, Private Sector, Return, South
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Siemens tells us about how luxury and integrated technology go hand in hand

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

Hoteliers throughout the world are facing the need to reconcile short-term investments in infrastructure and new technologies with the long-term business goals of profitability, sustainability and investor value creation.

India is emerging as one of the leading travel destinations, with the World Travel Organization forecasting increases in tourism year on year of almost 9 percent, with some 25 million tourists anticipated by 2015. This poses challenges for Indian hotel owners and operators. A project by Siemens for the Leela Palace Hotel in New Delhi illustrates the way in which these challenges are being met, with an integrated approach to energy efficiency, guest comfort, safety and security, and cost management.

Travel and tourism is being affected by the four megatrends of demographic change, globalization, urbanization and climate change. How hoteliers respond to these megatrends, as well as finding ways in which to meet the growing demand and changing and increasing guest expectations, is critical to success. The 16 floor Leela Palace in New Delhi is one of a group of hotels owned and managed by Hotel Leelaventure Ltd, a company established in 1983 in Mumbai. As one of the most celebrated Indian hospitality groups in the five star luxury sector and with numerous hotel and resort properties, meeting guest satisfaction and developing and protecting the Leela brand is key. Located in the diplomatic enclave area of New Delhi, the Leela Palace has 260 guest rooms, several restaurants offering Royal Indian, Modern Japanese, French and Italian gourmet cuisine, and an exclusive spa.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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India: Sustainable Tourism in Alleppey

Categories: Accommodations, Asia, Case Study, Management, Private Sector, South
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India Sustainable tourism in Alleppey

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

A boom in tourism across India needs to be carefully managed, as Kerala and the Alleppey backwaters have shown.

The Indian economy is currently judged to be growing at a faster rate than China’s. According to the Office of National Statistics, it is now the fastest growing major economy in the world.

Growing alongside it is the nation’s tourism industry. The WTTC (World Travel & Tourism Council) calculated that in 2012 tourism generated INR6.4 trillion or 6.6% of the nation’s GDP. It supported 39.5 million jobs; 7.7% of the country’s total employment. Between 2013 to 2023 the sector is expected to grow at an average annual rate of 7.9%.

India’s booming hotels sector is testament to the strong growth and future confidence of the tourism industry. But, many are beginning to understand a growth in tourist numbers needs careful management and regulation to ensure the knock-on effect to local people remains positive and not damaging.

This concern has been particularly highlighted in Kerala. One of the most popular destinations in India, tourism is growing at a rate of 13.31%. Located in the south-west of India on the tropical Malabar coast, its beaches, backwaters and countryside have seen it named one of the ten paradises of the world by National Geographic.

Touring the 900 km network of Keralan backwaters; a system of interconnected canals and rivers including five large lakes, has become increasingly common among tourists who take to houseboats to holiday in the often peaceful and picturesque region.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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Talking Point: India and the Cotton Supply Chain

Categories: Asia, Case Study, Flora, Land, Planet, Private Sector, Return, South, Supply Chain
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Talking Point India and the cotton supply chain

Photo Credits: Green Hotelier

Stephanie McIntosh had a career in supply chain development before founding Fou Furnishings, a certified Fairtrade and organic hotel linens supplier, and she published a thesis on developing organic cotton supply chains. Here she explains why it’s important for hoteliers to consider the people within their supply chains.

Cotton is a commodity which hotels procure in vast quantities, whether purchasing or renting linens, and the supply of cotton textiles impacts the lives of tens of millions employed in India’s second industry after agriculture.

Supply chain relationships offer a key way for hoteliers to make a difference to the quality, sustainability, delivery and cost of hotel products, as well as the lives of those working in support of their supply chains. Many hoteliers do not have visibility and consequently control of working conditions further down the supply chain.

The cotton textile supply chain has been subject to well publicised and documented social issues, negatively impacting the reputation of international brands. Simultaneously, the environmental impacts of cotton growing and processing also directly link to the human story. The negative coverage has led some global companies to make changes to their supply chain models and management of supplier responsibility. Changes to traditional supply chain metrics include giving equal weighting to sustainability and social measures, to not only prevent problems before they arise but also to extend the supply chain model beyond compliance, to one that builds social, environmental, and economic value.

Read more at Green Hotelier!

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Managing plastic waste is a global problem with increasing amounts of waste in developing countries as well as industrialised nations. This paper outlines the research that needs to be conducted before establishing a plastics recycling business, such as availability of raw material, availability of technology and funds, and market prospects for recycled products. Vital information about processes and equipment, and successful case studies are also included.

by www.practicalaction.org
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In Sri Lanka, home composting is promoted in many municipalities as a simple and low-cost solution to emerging waste disposal problems in the present day society. Produced by Practical Action South Asia, this technical brief is intended to disseminate the technology of concrete composting bin fabrication.

by www.practicalaction.org
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Practical Action Nepal Office has initiated a project “Strengthening Local Capacities in Integrated Sustainable Waste Management (ISWM) in small and medium municipalities of Nepal” with the financial support from European Union under its EC Asia Eco Pro II programme and close partnership among Practical Action Nepal, GTZ/udle, MuAN and WASTE. The project aims to improve the health and environmental conditions of disadvantaged people living in the project municipalities. One of the major activities of the project is to disseminate best practices on sustainable waste management technologies, processes and approaches, from which it can develop and adapt the processes that are suitable in the context of urban centres of developing countries.

by www.practicalaction.org
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