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Humpback whales are among the species found in the Revillagigedo archipelago. Photograph: Ullstein Bild/Getty Images

Fishing, mining and new hotels will be prohibited in the ‘biologically spectacular’ Revillagigedo archipelago

Mexico’s government has created the largest ocean reserve in North America around a Pacific archipelago regarded as its crown jewel.

The measures will help ensure the conservation of marine creatures including whales, giant rays and turtles.

The protection zone spans 57,000 sq miles (150,000 sq km) around the Revillagigedo islands, which lie 242 miles (390 km) south-west of the Baja California peninsula.

Mexico’s president, Enrique Peña Nieto, announced the decision in a decree that also bans mining and the construction of new hotels on the islands.

Read the full article on the creation of this new marine reserve here.

By   for The Guardian.

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Discussing how to reduce buffet waste during a panel discussion at the Ideo offices in New York. John Taggart for the New York Times.

Lawrence Eells, the executive chef at the Hyatt Regency Orlando, in Florida, would like his kitchen, or at least its operations, to be as lean as his roast beef. So in April, he welcomed a team of researchers looking at ways to reduce food waste, especially around the abundant all-you-can-eat buffets.

Their initial finding — that guests ate just over half of the food put out — surprised almost everyone. Perhaps even more striking was that only 10 to 15 percent of the leftovers could be donated or repurposed because of food safety regulations, while the rest ended up in the garbage. The sizable waste generated by coffee, juices and other liquids added to the conundrum.

Read the full article to find out ways found to reduce food waste in hotels. 

 

By Linda Himelstein for The New York Times. 

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From New York’s High Line park to new affordable housing in Oakland, a debate over the accessibility of green design has taken root. Credit: Shutterstock/Stuart Monk

 

In East Oakland, a few blocks from the home of the champion Golden State Warriors basketball team, a series of geometric buildings and well-tended green spaces cut a striking contrast to the overgrown vacant lots, industrial equipment yards and aging corner stores that dot the neighborhood.

Tassafaronga Village, a six-year-old, $52.8 million LEED Gold housing redevelopment project, is also an example of the tradeoffs that can emerge in the push to make cities more sustainable — not just environmentally, but also socially and economically.

From Miami to New York, Houston to Oakland, the term “climate gentrification” is on the rise.

 

Learn about climate gentrification here:

 

By Lauren Hepler on GreenBiz

 

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Credit: Shutterstock

Restaurants, campuses, and farmers are battling food waste in their industries. Here’s how you can join the effort.

 

America is one of the largest offenders of food waste in the world, according to a recent survey. Every year, roughly 1.3 billion tons of food is thrown out worldwide, a considerable problem given that agriculture contributes about 22 percent of the planet’s greenhouse gas emissions and 12.7 million people go hungry in America alone.

Entrepreneurs across several sectors have created ways to re-purpose food. Their efforts are admirable and economical, but the biggest difference will be if you make food waste reduction a daily habit.

 

 

Read more about how you can give food a new purpose here.

 

By Joseph Jaafari from NationSwell

 

 

 

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Credit: Shutterstock

 

Excess heat in Phoenix grounded more than 40 flights in recent days, and
scientists say a warming climate could also mean more turbulent rides.

In recent days, American Airlines has been forced to cancel more than 40 flights in Phoenix. The reason: With daytime highs hovering around 120 degrees, it was simply too hot for some smaller jets to take off. Hotter air is thinner air, which makes it more difficult — and sometimes impossible — for planes to generate enough lift.

As the global climate changes, disruptions like these are likely to become more frequent, researchers say, potentially making air travel costlier and less predictable with a greater risk of injury to travelers from increased turbulence.

Read more about climate change affects air travel here.

From Zach Wichter from The New York Times

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Solar panels at the Googleplex, headquarters of Google in Mountain View, Calif. Its data centers worldwide will run entirely on renewable energy by the end of this year, the technology giant announced in December. Credit Smith Collection/Gado, via Getty Images

 

The Trump administration may be pondering a retreat from the United States’ climate commitments, but corporate America is moving ahead with its own emissions goals.

Nearly half of the Fortune 500 biggest companies in the United States have now set targets to shrink their carbon footprints, according to a report published Tuesday by environmental organizations that monitor corporate emissions pledges. Twenty-five more companies adopted climate targets over the last two years, the groups said.

Almost two dozen companies, including Google, Walmart and Bank of America, have pledged to power their operations with 100 percent renewable energy, with varying deadlines, compared with just a handful in 2015. Google’s data centers worldwide will run entirely on renewable energy by the end of this year, the technology giant announced in December.

Read the full article on how companies step up on emissions here.

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Neill Duffy of Purpose + Sport Has Seen Sport Change the World — Now He’s Making Sure it Changes the World for the Better

Super Bowl 50

Growing up first in Zimbabwe, then in South Africa, Neill Duffy became aware early on of the challenges of economically and socially marginalized communities. Now CEO and founder of Purpose + Sport, a sports-marketing agency based in San Francisco, Duffy is recognized as a thought leader in supporting organizations to expand beyond philanthropy and corporate social responsibility to embrace sustainability and purpose as core strategic business drivers. In September, Purpose + Sport oversaw the implementation of the purpose component of Super Bowl 50, “the most shared, most participated in, most giving Super Bowl ever.” – By BtheChangeRead more.

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Flight Attendants Train to Spot Human Trafficking

Categories: Americas, Human Rights
Comments Off on Flight Attendants Train to Spot Human Trafficking
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Shelia Fedrick. Picture courtesy of Shelia Fedrick.

Shelia Fedrick said she instinctively felt something was wrong the moment she saw the girl with greasy blonde hair sitting in the window seat of aisle 10 on a flight from Seattle to San Francisco.

The girl “looked like she had been through pure hell,” said Fedrick, 49, a flight attendant working for Alaska Airlines. Fedrick guessed that the girl was about 14 or 15 years old, travelling with a notably well-dressed older man. The stark contrast between the two set off alarm bells in her head.

Fedrick tried to engage them in conversation, but the man became defensive, she said.

“I left a note in one of the bathrooms,” Fedrick said. “She wrote back on the note and said ‘I need help.'” – By Kalhan Rosenblatt. Read more on NBC News.

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The following video from Great Big Story, as part of its Planet Earth series, shares the story of Jessica Kilroy, a climber, composer, conservationist, and wind technician:

These days, giant wind turbines are supplying more and more of our clean energy. And when they break down, they need to be fixed fast. It’s a job only a few people are equipped to handle. Those who are afraid of heights need not apply. Rock climber Jessica Kilroy, for one, loves the challenge of blade repair. And though she makes dangling at dizzying heights look easy, her path to becoming a wind turbine technician has been anything but that. By Great Big Story. Also, read more on TreeHugger.com

 

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Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus announced Saturday, Jan. 14, that it plans to close forever in May after a 146-year run (Monica Akhtar/The Washington Post)


When Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus announced late Saturday that it would permanently end all of its performances this May after a 146-year run, there seemed to be a collective gasp online, along with a smattering of nostalgia for “The Greatest Show on Earth.”

The show has been, after all, nearly synonymous with “the circus” in the United States since the 1800s, when showman Phineas Taylor Barnum partnered with ringmaster James A. Bailey to produce an exhibition of animals and human oddities. Meanwhile, five brothers from the Ringling family in Wisconsin had set up their own variety act. By Amy B Wang. Read more on The Washington Post.

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