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All posts tagged Responsible Travel

Australia has shown immense dedication to the Sustainable Development Goals with the government, businesses, educational institutions, and individuals showing a strong commitment in building a sustainable future.

Below, we look at a few destinations from “down under” and their sustainability efforts.

Brisbane
The third largest city in Australia ranks high in terms of sustainability because of their efficient and easily accessible transport system. Due to their focus on sustainable activities such as composting, waste management, and recycling, Brisbane won the Dame Phyllis Frost first prize in 2015.

City of Canada Bay (Sydney)
The City of Canada Bay is an area located in Sydney. A common feature for all initiatives introduced by the local administration is the involvement of citizen participation. The city has also launched the Greenhouse Action Plan, with a commitment to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases.

Glenorchy (Hobart)
The small town of Glenorchy, located in Hobart, has been recognised for a project involving the industrial reuse of rainwater, which saves approximately 400 million litres of water a year. Furthermore, the town has taken steps to educate the youth with awareness campaigns on solidarity recycling, compost recycling and urban gardens.

For more examples of other noteworthy sustainable destinations in Australia, have a look at the list compiled by Keep Australia Beautiful here.

Tip for travellers

If you would like to find out which Australian tourism operators, accommodations, and attractions are eco-friendly, then look for accreditation by Ecotourism Australia. The Eco Certification logo is carried by those businesses that are recognised as environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable.

You can visit the Green Travel Guide, published by Ecotourism Australia, to go through their list of all accredited businesses.

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Photo credit: ITC/Pan Pet

Cultural tourism can create opportunities that benefit travelers and the destination, but it requires thoughtful balance and strategy. We found insight from Peter Richards, consultant on Cultural Tourism Development and Market Access for the International Trade Centre.

Q: What are the most important elements of responsible travel as a whole?

Read the interview to find out how Peter Richards answered this question among others on living heritage experiences, as well as challenges and solutions and more here.

A Featured Conversation for PATA Conversations.

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Travelling breaks down barriers and promotes diversity. Travel is about shared experiences and building friendships. It is a great way to learn understanding for different customs.

If we teach our children how to make the right travel choices, it can not only benefit them, but it will also make the world a better place.

 

Here are some ways to travel more responsibly with your children:

 

  1. Choose sustainable transport

Explain to children how biking, walking or using public transport is much better for the planet and then choose one of those modes of transport every day during your holiday. Understanding the impact of your carbon footprint will help children to grow into more responsible travellers. Read more on green transportation here.

 

  1. Choose responsible destinations

Make time to plan your trip together with your children – research each destination’s commitment to the protection of people, animals, sites of important historic interests and, of course, the environment. Participating in this process enables younger travellers to learn about the importance of sustainable and responsible travel. Read about top destinations that enforce sustainable tourism here.

 

  1. Get off the beaten path

Choose places where you may connect with locals and learn about their traditions. Building closer connections with a place is much more enjoyable and inspiring for you and your children. Consider asking your tour operator about participating in a community based tour or a local handcraft activity.

 

  1. Encounter wildlife with respect

Teach your children a few basic rules and lead by example: use a quiet voice, do not touch, feed or get too close to wildlife and always obey the rules and instructions.

 

Showing children how to travel responsibly now will shape them into empathic and compassionate travellers and more learned members of society. And by travelling with them as responsible adults it’s a fascinating learning experience for the entire family.

Read more on sustainable travel with children here.

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Conference promotes sustainable tourism among young travelers

The wonders of traveling are figuratively a click away for today’s youth. It is more apparent that the millennials, with their spending capability and insatiable thirst for exploring and sharing their experiences, are in the position to redefine the face of tourism as we knew it.

Social media abounds with proof. Whether it is about scaling a mountain or diving under the sea, today’s travelers are more than willing to tell others about their memories. Many profiles show a glimpse of travel stories captured in breathtaking photos and cool travel videos.

But traveling is not just about adventure and pampering. Nowadays, the adventure of a lifetime comes with soul searching and giving back components. Putting meaning to their globetrotting, young explorers go for authentic experiences, which explain the surge of homestay, “voluntourism” or volunteering for tourism efforts, and interaction with locals. By INQ POP. Read the original article here.

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Responsible Travel crestcampocuba

Image Source: CREST

The Center for Responsible Travel (CREST) has published their annual report on the state of responsible tourism:

“This 2016 version of CREST’s annual study demonstrates that the growth of responsible tourism continues to outpace growth of the tourism industry as a whole. In addition, the 2016 report concludes that “the social and environmental imperative for responsible travel” is being spurred, in part, by the twin crises of wealth inequality and climate change. The report was prepared in collaboration with 16 leading tourism organizations and institutions.”

The report also puts a spotlight on the growing niche markets of adventure tourism, agritourism, culinary or gastronomic tourism, orange tourism, wellness tourism, and the sharing economy (e.g., Uber and AirBnB).

Read the full report here.

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by Johanna Meissner, Sustainability & Social Responsibility Associate, PATA

 

travelThe one thing I have always known I wanted to do in my life is to travel. The thought of experiencing what life is like in other places of the world has always motivated my wanderlust, so you could say it was only natural that I would end up pursuing a career in the tourism industry.

I was hoping that, by studying tourism management I could live out my passion of travelling and experiencing other cultures and places, meeting people from all over the world.

I found that responsible tourism is very well suited to cater to this exact way of travelling and I know I am not the only one seeking these kinds of experiences.

Read more

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Eat, Pray, Litter: The Truth About Tourists in Bali

Categories: Recommended Reading
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Bali

Bali was not the Eat, Pray, Love paradise I naively envisioned. There. I finally admitted it. On one hand, there was that handful of memorable Zen moments I wrote about and will forever cherish, but on the other end of this wacky spectrum are the moments that made me give Bali a serious side-eye. By Renne Simpson. Read more.

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Ecotourism and Responsible Travel: Useful Tips From Expert Travel Bloggers

 

Once they invited Mother Teresa to take part in a street protest against poverty and she refused it kindly. The reason? She explained she would never fight AGAINST something, but rather always FOR something.

You might ask, how does that relate to ecotourism and responsible travel? Ivana Greslikova Read more.

How Greenloons Is Helping People Book Responsible Travel Experiences

Categories: Accessibility, Marketing, Planet, Private Sector, Recommended Reading, Visitors
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How Greenloons Is Helping People Book Responsible Travel Experiences

April 18 2014 – Are you an ethical traveler? Irene Lane of Greenloons helps us wade through the marketing jargon to discover which tour operators are actually eco-friendly and sustainable (and how to tell the difference between the two). Jessica Festa Read more.

 

November 02 2015 – Anna Pollock, Founder of Conscious Travel, was invited to create a context document that could help identify, promote and support social entrepreneurship within a rapidly changing tourism and hospitality sector. The Conscious Travel Approach articulates an emerging form of community-driven, responsible tourism Jeremy Smith Read more.