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Credit: Jeremy Smith on WTM

Last week, I spent a night in a hotel in Brussels that has taken a circular economy approach to redesigning the way its loyalty scheme works. Following on from my previous blog about how we in the industry can engage tourists by making them proud to be part of our efforts to promote sustainability, I want to look today at how rethinking the way such loyalty programmes operate could further help deliver on our aims.

Most people staying in a hotel – especially a city-based one – don’t just stay in the hotel. They wander out and explore. So why don’t hotels create partnerships with ethical shops, experiences, restaurants, low carbon transport alternatives and more in the neighbourhoods where they work. Such a ‘Hotel Eco Loyalty Programme’ (HELP) could provide me with discounts and incentives at these establishments and operators, helping me discover the city through them while supporting their efforts to assist the communities and environments where they work.

Read the full blog post here.

By JEREMY SMITH for WTM

 

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This study found understanding the strategic value and design of collaborative linkages in tourism is likely to play a significant role in ensuring businesses’ competitiveness and supporting the sustainability of destinations. Its objectives were to determine the factors that hinder and/or foster collaboration between tourism and/or non-tourism businesses; identify the respondents’ perceptions of costs, benefits, risks, current barriers, and potential actions to encourage collaboration in and across regions. It then used the information to identify gaps, future opportunities and possible directions for collaboration in regional areas.

by Pascal Tremblay and Aggie Wegner

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As demand grows for tourism opportunities within Australian protected areas, partnerships are increasingly seen as the way forward in dealing with the variety of interests involved and ensuring that sustainability goals are pursued. Previous tourism partnership research has not made the most of opportunities to consult related literature from a broad range of disciplines and use associated theoretical developments as a basis for analysis. This technical report addresses this gap through a multi-disciplinary review of partnerships research to reconcile the often multifarious definitions of partnership and allied concepts, such as collaboration and cooperation, and the various meanings given to success, as well as to identify factors which might impact upon partnership success or failure.

by Jennifer Laing, Aggie Wegner, Susan Moore, Betty Weiler, Sharron Pfueller, Diane Lee, Jim Macbeth, Glen Croy and Michael Lockwood

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In Western Australia, licensing is utilised by State Government agencies to regulate the behaviour of the nature tourism industry from a number of perspectives. This study examined whether, in addition to its intended benefits, the State’s current licensing framework is creating impediments or costs for commercial nature tourism operators. Interviews with licensing agency representatives and a review of the literature pointed to licensing compliance costs as the main complaint from nature tour operators. Sources of dissatisfaction included the need for multiple licenses from multiple agencies, license security, added paperwork, and non-transferability of some types of licenses.

by Sabrina Genter, Jo Ann Beckwith and David Annandale

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