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Credit: iStock/Bicho_raro

According to the Family Travel Association, family travel represents 30 percent of the entire leisure travel market and is the fastest-growing segment in the travel industry.

Within families, that means it is up to the adults to foster a sense of responsibility in a new generation of global citizens and environmental stewards. Traveling with kids in a sustainable way not only teaches them to respect and appreciate the world around them, it encourages them to perpetuate those practices.

Read the full article here.

By Gina Decaprio Vercesi for Greenmatters.

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Support Refugees

Categories: Green Tips
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Image Source: Travindy

Refugees have always been an emotional topic around the world and especially today as Europe is experiencing large movements of refugees throughout the continent. The issue, usually, is that the governments are overwhelmed with attempts to integrate those refugees properly, and sadly, many of them do not receive a warm welcome upon arrival.

Since the travel and tourism industry deals with both hospitality and the movement of people, our industry is very well suited to support refugees.

Travindy has collected “15 Ways Tourism Can Help Refugees,” which was developed by looking at good practices done by tourism enterprises, and which can be continuously developed.

View the downloadable PDF from Travindy.

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The International Ecotourism Society, TIES, defines ecotourism as “responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people.” The concept arose in the 1970s from the general global environmental movement, and by the 1990s was one of the fastest-growing tourism sectors. Ecotourism appeals to responsible travelers who want to minimize the negative impacts of their visit, and who take special interest in local nature and cultures. Carole Simm. Read more.

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