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All posts tagged Ecosystem

A Flickr image of a seal taken at Scotland’s Forvie nature reserve. Verino77 via Flickr, CC BY-NC-SA

Watching animals in their natural habitat may seem harmless, but it can have serious consequences for the conservation status of wildlife. More than 1,400 species listed as Endangered and Critically Endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature are threatened by tourism. This can be a consequence of habitat destruction caused by tourism development or disturbance caused by tourists.

Consequently, we need to find ways to manage these activities so that the targeted wildlife can continue to thrive and the businesses that depend on it can remain economically viable. This is not an easy task.

The first obstacle on the path to managing nature tourism sustainably can be overcome by harnessing the power of the internet and social media. We can use this data to identify areas where wildlife is under strong pressure from recreational activities and intervene, perhaps preventing any significant impacts on the wildlife. We can also investigate whether nature recreation is helping countries to achieve biodiversity and sustainability targets, such as the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. For example, we can look for associations between nature tourism growth and progress towards biodiversity and sustainability goals in different countries.

Read the full article here.

By Francesca Mancini of The Conversation.

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UNEP CBD - Tourism Supporting Biodiversity

A healthy natural environment is one of the world’s most important tourism attractions, and that visiting nature serves to heighten awareness of its intrinsic value for us all, a new manual launched by the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) presents guidelines on sustainable tourism and management.

Geared towards being both practical and accessible, Tourism Supporting Biodiversity: A Manual on applying the CBD Guidelines on Biodiversity and Tourism Development, highlights the important role tourism plays for biodiversity and aims to improve knowledge and materials to better integrate biodiversity into sustainable tourism development.

“The manual is a reference tool for planners, developers, managers and decision makers involved with tourism development and resource management in areas of sensitive biodiversity,” said Braulio Ferreira de Souza Dias, CBD Executive Secretary. “The purpose is to help them to mainstream biodiversity concerns and ecosystem services within sustainable tourism development.”

With its emphasis on management and governance, the manual, prepared as a result of experiences compiled by the Secretariat and decisions taken by countries at the eleventh and twelfth meetings of the Conference of the Parties to the CBD, reflects a wider perspective on approaches and experiences in sustainable tourism development and management. It serves to complement the more technical User’s Manual on the CBD Guidelines on Biodiversity and Tourism Development, published in 2007.

The manual is the result of a collaboration between the CBD Secretariat, the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and some 140 experts from around the world to identify current trends and upcoming issues and opportunities on the links between sustainable tourism development and the CBD agenda, and is meant to be used as a transformative tool for sustainable consumption.

 

 

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Chile-12-629x417

September 22 2015 – Chile’s altiplano or high plateau region, pounded by the sun of the Atacama desert, the driest place in the world, is home to dozens of indigenous communities struggling for subsistence by means of sustainable tourism initiatives that are not always that far removed from out-of-control capitalism. Marianela Jarroud Read more. 

To commemorate World Oceans Day this past Monday June 8, we bring you ways to help you make sustainable seafood decisions.

In cultures around the world, seafood is a large part of a person’s diet, and is a delicacy enjoyed by many. Sustainable seafood means the food from our waters is caught or farmed responsibly, thereby ensuring the long-term health of our marine ecosystems as well as the livelihood of those who depend on seafood. By making educated decisions when eating seafood, we can help put an end to overfishing, and still enjoy delicious fish and shellfish for years to come.

Here are some guides to help you make educated menu decisions:
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Mainstreaming ecosystem considerations into business is becoming increasingly important in order to deal with the challenges of a resource-constrained world. This Guide to Corporate Ecosystem Valuation (CEV) is a valuable addition to the toolkit used by business today. It can be used in relation to business operations as well as to suppliers, customers and other stakeholders.

by The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)

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In response to concerns over the influence of visitor activities on site ecosystem health, natural resource managers have expressed an interest in predictive models that might be able to identify affected sites before deleterious impacts have occurred. Hadwen, Arthington and Mosisch (2003) developed one such predictive model, known as the Tourist Pressure Index or TPI. Their TPI aimed to predict visitor numbers to significant sites (pristine lakes) on the World Heritage Listed Fraser Island (Queensland, Australia). In this study, we sought to apply the TPI model to sites on Fraser Island and developed thresholds for Early Warning and Management Action that can be used by natural resource managers to respond to site use before they become degraded from excessive visitor use.

by Wade Hadwen and Angela Arthington

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Where Do They Go? Predicting Visitation Intensity at Focal Tourist Sites within Protected Areas

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Detecting Visitor Impacts in and around Aquatic Ecosystems within Protected Areas

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In this study, we sought to evaluate: a) the range of activities undertaken by visitors to aquatic ecosystems and the likely ecological consequences of those activities, and b) the sensitivity and scale of response of existing aquatic indicators. By combining these two evaluations, we collated a list of aquatic indicators that might be responsive to the spatial and temporal disturbances associated with visitor activities in particular, and as such, might show considerable promise in being further developed and implemented in monitoring and assessment programs within protected areas.

by Wade L Hadwen, Angela H Arthington, Paul I Boon

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Vultures are often derided for being ugly and smelly, but these incredibly efficient scavengers help humanity by eating dead animals. And India has recently found just how crucial this role is to our well-being. By BBC. Read more.

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